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All steel. Designed to withstand military conditions. Simple firing mechanism with two safeties. Accurate, dependable and aesthetically appealing. Designed fully around the .45acp caliber full metal jacket. I have carried one for over 30 years and will until I am unable.
 

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The 1911 has proven itself under more adverse conditions than any other handgun. It is better looking and reliable. I have carried one since Dec. 1969 and still do.
 

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“An elegant weapon, for a more civilized age.” - Obi-Wan Kenobi

I have a single 1911 - it’s a budget Rock Island GI full-size in 9mm. It shoots better than my P320 M17. Something about the way it fits the hand, pointing naturally, the straight-back trigger press - it shoots like a laser gun for me. It usually finds its way into my range bag.
 
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I carried one in Vietnam and when I pick mine up the muscle memory responds. The gun is beautifully balanced and absorbs recoil well. I find them accurate, although others disagree. I enjoy shooting it. It's single stack and easy to conceal, although the weight can be a problem. All the bruhaha about the .45 round (for or against) bores me; it turns out most handgun calibers have the same "stopping power." Also, magazine capacity is not an issue for me. A self-defense situation is not a firefight and mostly happens fast and close; 8 rounds is adequate.
 

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I’ll give you the perspective from a guy who started handgun shooting in the ‘80s around age 14. Bought a Beretta 92 when he turned 21. Shot 1911s and M9s in the military, and carried a Glock 19 for years, and switched to polymer DA/SA handguns currently.

What the 1911 offers is a handgun designed over 100 years ago when labor was cheap, gun manufacture was a combination of craft, art and industrial design, that still required a large amount of human labor to piece together. It came at a time when a lone gun designer was on a serious hot streak of innovating within the industry, with probably the best grasp on what was possible with the tools of the time. He made efforts to make this pistol, ergonomic (which wasn’t really a well understood concept). He made a pistol that could be fully disassembled for deep maintenance, using only the parts of the pistol itself.

This combination of experience, the times, and the design, resulted in a comfortable pistol. It features a trigger that has remained a standard to measure other handgun triggers against. Controls were all easy to reach. It is an easy gun to shoot well.

If you get a chance to pick up, hold, cycle and shoot a high end 1911 that actually still has hand fitted parts (sorry to those who own mass produced 1911s here, but in this regard they don’t compare) you will experience how smooth a handgun can be with zero play in the large parts.

Does that hand fit feel mean anything in a field grade gun? Not really. (Here is where owners of mass produced 1911s can smile again.). For defensive purposes, carry, duty use, etc, the mass produced 1911s work fine and give good practical accuracy, usually better than the shooters are capable of.

they are heavy, which sucks for carry, but great for soaking up recoil. The trigger is great for a target gun but could be considered almost a case for increased liability if lawyers got to decide. Some can be finicky on ammo. Capacity is low compared to modern options. The grip safety was not even something John Browning wanted on the pistol, but the Army was still concerned about cavalry use and dropped handguns from horseback discharging when it was being considered for adoption.

it’s a great piece of Americana, gun history, firearm design, and fun to shoot.
 

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I totally agree that it's a great piece of American, gun history, etc. and that's why I want one.
But in terms of shootability, I think the CZ steel series, especially the various Shadows 1 and 2, SAO TS guns, etc. are a better deal. Smooth shooting as well, nice weight and balance. Most important, less maintenance than the average 1911, easier clean up and disasembly, fewer reports of extractor problems, cheap and trouble free double stack magazines. Almost all CZs, even race guns, are under $2000 while most of nicer the 1911/2011 variants are at least $2000 and usually over $3000, with some magazines over $100. Moreover, you get a taste of the good life at around $650 with a CZ 75b. Much better than a Rock Island or lowest end Springfield GI.

So for me the appeal of the 1911 is history, elegance of design, and 45 acp if you shoot it and don't mind single stack.
 

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Well, it is a thread about what is appealing about the 1911.
I can’t honestly say that a Sig 210 or. CZ Shadow may not have equal appeal, but those may be for other reasons.

I don’t know that the P210 or CZ 75 would have come to be or at least not in the timeframe in which they did, without the development and influence of the 1911 and Browning HiPower. And the Hi Power benefited from experience gained form the 1911 and other firearms,

Though it doesn’t weigh heavy with me, I will point out before someone else does,…

Because: .45 Bro. ‘Merica and .45 are like apple pie, Bro.
 

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I good while back I had a Springfield Armory Mil-Spec .45. It was a great pistol that was very accurate. Sadly it was the victim of a trade for a gun that I no longer remember.
I think i will do a bit of shopping for a replacement.;)
 

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I don't understand what the appeal of these pistols are either? They have antiquated technology that's been around since 1911. They come in all shapes, sizes and configurations by a wide variety of different manufacturers. You can get them in 22, 9mm, 38 Super, 45 ACP, both 45 and 460 Rowland. Myself I would never own one, I've got to have at least seven of them including three of those lousy Kimber's that some people love to hate. Probably because of their use of MIM (Metal Injection Molding) parts. But you're not going to find too many modern guns that do not use the same technology. One of the biggest advantages of MIM parts is that complex parts assemblies can be molded into one part and they produce a finished part. Colt now uses MIM sears in their 1911's.

My Wilson EDC X9 and EDC X9 S are technically a 1911 only double stack 9mm's. Except for not having a removable bushing, grip safeties and different extractors the internals are for all intents and purposes the same. Complete disassembly and reassembly are practically the same. The EDC X9 S does not have removable grip panels. Instead it has a one piece machined aluminum frame.

My very first handgun is the Colt 1911 at the top left. It was made in 1941 and was originally in .38 Super. I converted it to 45 ACP using the top end from a Colt Commander. I still have the original parts in case I want to change it back. It had already been re-blued at least once that I know of. But after carrying it so much the bluing wore on the frame and developed a light surface rust. I then had the frame refinished with Metalife a hard matte chrome plating that stood up well.

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I totally agree that it's a great piece of American, gun history, etc. and that's why I want one.
But in terms of shootability, I think the CZ steel series, especially the various Shadows 1 and 2, SAO TS guns, etc. are a better deal. Smooth shooting as well, nice weight and balance. Most important, less maintenance than the average 1911, easier clean up and disasembly, fewer reports of extractor problems, cheap and trouble free double stack magazines. Almost all CZs, even race guns, are under $2000 while most of nicer the 1911/2011 variants are at least $2000 and usually over $3000, with some magazines over $100. Moreover, you get a taste of the good life at around $650 with a CZ 75b. Much better than a Rock Island or lowest end Springfield GI.

So for me the appeal of the 1911 is history, elegance of design, and 45 acp if you shoot it and don't mind single stack.
CZ's are outstanding pistols that's for sure. I have seven of them. As far as easier clean up and maintenance than a 1911? If you're talking about a basic field strip they're not much different than a 1911 except on a CZ you do not have to retract the slide as far. Just line up the marks on the frame and slide and remove the slide stop. However you need the magazine base plate, the end of a screw driver handle or something similar to push in the slide stop. As far as a complete disassembly/reassembly they can be a real pain in the ass. You need to use slave pins to hold all of the parts together in the sear cage while removing the cage otherwise the parts will go flying all over the place. Putting the sear cage back together is no simple matter either especially on the de-cocker versions. Again you need to use slave pins. I also use a small machinist's vise to hold the cage while putting the parts and tiny little springs in back in place. Unless you have experience working on guns it's not for the faint of heart. You'll also need the proper sized pin punches and hammer.

CZ's also have a lot of machining and tooling marks that you can feel in their actions. However they don't affect the gun's reliability. CZ's are built like tanks. All of mine have worked straight out of the box with all types of ammo. But I did polish out all of machining and tooling marks on all of my CZ's, now they feel like they're on ball bearings. A friction free gun is a happy gun. My CZ Shadow 2 straight out of the box has got to have thee best DA/SA trigger out of all the DA/SA semi auto's that I own. That along with it's all steel construction and it feels like you're shooting a 22. The gun is about as accurate as one could get and are a favorite amongst competition shooters. My CZ 97 B has got to be one of my favorite 45's. I replaced the hammer with a race hammer, adjustable sear, a short reach trigger and floating trigger pin. I also added night sights. 97 B's are hard to come by and are not as popular as CZ's other models.

1911's on the other hand can be completely disassembled/reassembled without the use of any tools by using some of the gun's parts as tools. It's not all that complicated if you're familiar with the internal parts of a 1911.

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I've been shooting handguns about 40 years & never shot a 1911. Or even picked one up. From what I've read I need to spend a lot of money upgrading a cheap 1911 or buying one out of my budget or I won't like it. I tend to spend $300-400 on guns, sometimes less. But I will rent a 1911 eventually. My range has a few. My curiosity comes from the fact that the cover of almost every gun magazine has a pic of a 1911 on it nearly every month. I've probably read a thousand articles on 1911 mods. Probably the most popular gun on the planet so my opinion's on hold until I shoot one. I'll commit until tomorrow when I get to the range & I'll post my result. I do have a 45. SIG P250 full size 10+1. I love it. Very reliable & accurate. My house gun.
 

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I've been shooting handguns about 40 years & never shot a 1911. Or even picked one up. From what I've read I need to spend a lot of money upgrading a cheap 1911 or buying one out of my budget or I won't like it. I tend to spend $300-400 on guns, sometimes less. But I will rent a 1911 eventually. My range has a few. My curiosity comes from the fact that the cover of almost every gun magazine has a pic of a 1911 on it nearly every month. I've probably read a thousand articles on 1911 mods. Probably the most popular gun on the planet so my opinion's on hold until I shoot one. I'll commit until tomorrow when I get to the range & I'll post my result. I do have a 45. SIG P250 full size 10+1. I love it. Very reliable & accurate. My house gun.
The average price of Rock Island Armory 1911's are between $400 and $500. They're made in the Philippines, imported and sold by Armscor in Nevada. I don't own one so I couldn't tell you how good they are. From what I've read about them they have a good reputation for the money. My guess is that they do not have the fit and finish of their more expensive counterparts. But supposedly they're pretty reliable. I believe that their parts are interchangeable with most of the aftermarket parts and accessories out there. Although some may require fitting.

1911's are indeed ubiquitous. You're not going to find too many people that are really into handguns that do not have at least one in their possession. I don't know? If you're willing to spend $400 on a handgun $50 to $100 more equates to 4 or 5 boxes of ammo. You can blow that away in just one shooting session.
 
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