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i keep taking all day to swap rear sights on slides and scuffing up rear sights. id like to know where to get the real tools for such. my late 1990s early 2000 vintage universal sight press never was very useful on anything i tried it on.

im still carefully using punches and tape to try and not tear up stuff. id like to be as professional as possible. any advice? thanks.
 

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i keep taking all day to swap rear sights on slides and scuffing up rear sights. id like to know where to get the real tools for such. my late 1990s early 2000 vintage universal sight press never was very useful on anything i tried it on.

im still carefully using punches and tape to try and not tear up stuff. id like to be as professional as possible. any advice? thanks.
I've used the Wheeler Engineering Handgun Sight Tool from Midwest Gun Works because I own a wide variety of guns. But the MGW Armory Range Master Universal Sight Tool is an even better option but you have to buy the proper slide shoe for each individual gun. I bought the Wheeler because I didn't want to buy half a dozen individual slide shoe's and I already had two MGW Sight tools that are made for a specific gun.

These tools are not cheap. Looking back I probably would have been better off buying the MGW Armory Range Master in the first place. The Wheeler Engineering tool works fine but the MGW Tool is even better because of the fact that in addition to the 4 horizontal adjusting clamps the slide shoe keeps the slide centered in the tool. Not only does this give you additional clamping force but there's less adjustments to make when centering the slide in the tool.

You also have to take into consideration because of the cost of these tools how often are you going to use them? If it's only once you're better off taking it to a gunsmith or someone you know who has the tools. However the tools can come in handy if later on you have to make minor adjustments to the sights. I also use two small thin pieces of leather, neoprene or something similar between the horizontal clamps and the flats of the slide. This way if the slide moves slightly after it's clamped in place you won't end up marring it all up. I cut some excess leather that came from the straps of a shoulder holster harness, it's about 1/16 of an inch thick. The problem with tape is that you can easily tear through it when clamping down the slide. You want to make sure that the slide is clamped down tight to avoid any movement.

Another trick is with the same pieces of leather you can clamp the slide in a vise. Then with a brass punch and hammer just get the sight(s) started before using the sight tool to remove them. Also find out which way the sights are removed and installed. Some are designed to be removed and installed one way. If the new sight is way too tight going in you may have to take a piece of 320 wet or dry sandpaper and sand the bottom of the sight on a flat surface. You don't want to take off too much just go a little at a time until the sight goes about one quarter of the way in. Then let the tool do the rest. Some people run a bead of red Loctite in the dovetail of the slide. Myself, I would not recommend that. It may make adjusting the sights later on nearly impossible without having to heat the area first.
Wheeler Engineering Armorer's Handgun Sight Tool MGW Armory Range Master Universal Sight Tool
 
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