Handgun Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a G26, s/n: TDFxxx. How can I find out what pull rating my trigger connector has? My manual says it comes with 2.5lb - 5.5lb. I would like to lighten the effort to pull the trigger. What should I replace to get a smoother, easier pull?
Thanks for any suggestions.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,352 Posts
Glocks can come from the factory with various combinations of connectors and trigger springs that will affect the weight of the trigger pull.

If your pistol was purchased "new", the label on the handle of the box/carrying case should have a line that says something like "5.5 lb", which would indicate a normal 5.5 pound connector and no optional spring.

If the pistol was bought used, it may have had the spring and/or connector changed, so the info on the label may no longer be accurate. Then we have to get into identifying the different individual components, which is a bit more tricky.

Assuming your pistol has a normal spring and a 5.5 pound connector, the easiest thing to do would be to get a "-" (minus) connector installed, which should knock about a pound off the pull weight as well as make the pull seem less abrupt at the release point. If your pistol has an extra-power spring (NY1 or NY2) installed, I'd try a standard spring first, then try the "-" connector second. You should know that Glock Inc., does not endorse the use of the lighter connector for pistols used for personal defense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,322 Posts
This is what I do to most of my Glocks. I say most because the ones that have not had this full treatment are my gen3 G26 and gen3 G27.

  • For the compact and subcompact Glocks, I install the smooth faced trigger from the full size versions in the same group. I then carefully trim the trigger safety tang just enough to contour its face so that it will merge with the contour of the trigger face.
  • I perform a thorough polishing of all internal contacting metal surfaces using a Dremel polishing wheel and a high quality polishing cream.* I bring these surfaces to a high sheen (the infamous 25 cent trigger job).
  • I install a Glock 3.5 connector (part #00135).
  • I install a 6 pound trigger spring which I get from GlockParts.com.

These modifications return a pull weight of between 4 pounds 14 ounces and 5 pounds with a nice smooth action in the first stage, a reasonably crisp break (it IS a Glock after all), and a very good reset.

* This requires a full detailed stripping of the gun in order to remove the striker safety block and the striker for polishing. Remember, you want to polish all of the contacting metal surfaces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to both DJ Niner and SouthernBoy. My Glock was bought new and the handle label says 5.5 lb. I'm not much into doing the detailed Dremel work, so I think I'll try the 3.5 connector and 6 lb. spring. I'll make a post when the mods are finished and I have a chance to try it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,322 Posts
Thanks to both DJ Niner and SouthernBoy. My Glock was bought new and the handle label says 5.5 lb. I'm not much into doing the detailed Dremel work, so I think I'll try the 3.5 connector and 6 lb. spring. I'll make a post when the mods are finished and I have a chance to try it out.
I have tested five different connectors in my primary carry gen3 G23 and found that the Glock 3.5 connector I mentioned above to be the best all around connector for my purposes. As for doing the polishing work, it is not hard at all... actually quite simple and takes about a half hour. There are many videos out there showing how to detail strip a Glock. If you are comfortable doing this, go for it. If not, don't.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
5,699 Posts
I have tested five different connectors in my primary carry gen3 G23 and found that the Glock 3.5 connector I mentioned above to be the best all around connector for my purposes. As for doing the polishing work, it is not hard at all... actually quite simple and takes about a half hour. There are many videos out there showing how to detail strip a Glock. If you are comfortable doing this, go for it. If not, don't.
does the trigger pull lighten up any after much use?
I have a glock, but have not put many rounds through it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,322 Posts
does the trigger pull lighten up any after much use?
I have a glock, but have not put many rounds through it.
Yes, a little. What it is more prone to do is to get a little smoother. But this means thousands of dry fire sessions along with trips to the range. The single best move to take if one is not of a mind to install a different connector and/or a stronger trigger spring is to do the polishing job (25 cent trigger job). This will definitely smooth things out and will drop the pull weight a little... but just a little.

BTW, a gen4 is not going to respond as much to this as a gen3. The reason is the trigger bar safety block cam. It has a small protrusion on its outside that rubs the side of the slides right rail (when viewed from the rear). This protrusion should be polished vigorously (do not remove metal - warranty issue). You can expect about a half a pound difference between the gen3 and gen4 when the same work as been done to both. Also, if you use a six pound trigger spring with a lighter connector in a gen4, expect the trigger to hang and not fully return when the gun is new. This will go away with lots of dry fire work as well as range time.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
5,699 Posts
Yes, a little. What it is more prone to do is to get a little smoother. But this means thousands of dry fire sessions along with trips to the range. The single best move to take if one is not of a mind to install a different connector and/or a stronger trigger spring is to do the polishing job (25 cent trigger job). This will definitely smooth things out and will drop the pull weight a little... but just a little.

BTW, a gen4 is not going to respond as much to this as a gen3. The reason is the trigger bar safety block cam. It has a small protrusion on its outside that rubs the side of the slides right rail (when viewed from the rear). This protrusion should be polished vigorously (do not remove metal - warranty issue). You can expect about a half a pound difference between the gen3 and gen4 when the same work as been done to both. Also, if you use a six pound trigger spring with a lighter connector in a gen4, expect the trigger to hang and not fully return when the gun is new. This will go away with lots of dry fire work as well as range time.
Thanks SouthernBoy, Also wanted to ask, if you up grade the recoil slide spring assembly in your Glocks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,322 Posts
Thanks SouthernBoy, Also wanted to ask, if you up grade the recoil slide spring assembly in your Glocks?
No, I haven't done this to any of my Glocks. I have considered a steel guide rod and spring assembly but have not gone there yet.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
5,699 Posts
No, I haven't done this to any of my Glocks. I have considered a steel guide rod and spring assembly but have not gone there yet.
I am assuming , that you have put many rounds through a couple Glocks over the years. You Never been an issue with the the spring assembly?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,352 Posts
Thousands of rounds through more than two dozen Glocks over the last 2 decades, not a single problem with a factory Recoil Spring Assembly.

I've seen a few damaged by folks that did not seat/re-seat them properly prior to reassembly (usually end up with a chip in the rear rim), but I've never had any problems myself.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
5,699 Posts
good to know,thanks.
I bought an upgraded spring assembly for my glock 27. but have not yet changed it out until I am at the range and can trust the reliability of the new spring assembly.
I ''m not having any problems at all with the factory spring. My glock comes with me everyday. Just wish I could have the high capacity capability here in NY.
Recoil Spring Exchange Program | GLOCK USA
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
494 Posts
Most of the friction and hesitancy in a Glock's trigger pull comes from the contact area in and around the striker safety as well as the trigger bar cam which operates that safety. Anything you can do to polish or smooth out the function of these parts is sure to help.

What you do NOT want to do is use either a lighter (and unsafe to use) striker safety spring or a much too soft titanium safety button. I'm another one who uses a Dremel Tool in order to, 'mirror polish' ALL of a Glock's internal parts. (I even work on the edges of things with a diamond file.) All of my connectors are, '3.5#'; and both my striker and trigger return springs are the heavier 6# Wolff Gunsprings. In my current opinion the best, '3.5#' connectors available are either the original Glock OEM part, or Ghost Rocket's new, 'EVO'.

You CAN do a certain amount of polishing with nothing more than Simichrome or Flitz metal polish, and a pile of handheld Q-Tips; but the best way to polish small metal parts is with a Dremel Tool. Problem is that too many people do not know the right way to use a Dremel Tool; and instead of taking the time to learn on old pieces of cheap metal, they'll rev up the Dremel and jump right into attempting to high speed polish their pistol's internal parts.

Key things you're need to know about running a Dremel Tool?

(1) Always work barehanded so you can feel any generated heat building up in the metal. (If it starts to get too hot to touch, STOP and move onto another area or part.)

(2) Unless you're a highly skilled armorer/gunsmith do NOT attempt to work on the edges of things; and be particularly careful to stay away from all edges on both the striker lug and sear, 'kick plate'.

(3) Remember that you're polishing - NOT grinding. Never dremel on a part for more than a few seconds at a time, and always do your best to avoid heat buildup. When it's shiny, STOP! You're finished!

(4) While you're learning how to use a Dremel Tool do NOT run the tool at more than 2,500 rpm. When you get good at power polishing your Dremel speed can be increased to 5,000 + rpm; BUT, this isn't a speed for the inexperienced to attempt - OK! (Remember: The faster the rpm's the tougher it's going to be to control the Dremel Tool; and, although it may take a few minutes longer you can still do just as much polishing at a much lower and more controllable rpm speed.)

More than 10 years ago I started using Wolff Gunspring's metal guide rods in my 3rd generation Glocks. THERE ARE SIGNIFICANT OPERATIONAL ADVANTAGES! (The factory even proved this by, 'metalizing' their new Gen4 guide rods; but this topic just never seems to die, and continues to remain as a perpetual internet gun forum argument.)

The way I first discovered, 'How' a metal guide rod improves my Glock's performance occurred when I bought my first G-21. It had the old #4256 trigger bar in it; and the failure to return-to-battery rate was anywhere from 8 to 10 rounds out of every 100 that I fired! (A very dangerous pistol!)

After I installed my first Wolff Gunspring's metal guide rod (and did nothing else to the pistol) that failure rate dropped from 8 - 10 all the way down to 2 - 3! 'Why' you might wonder? A stiff metal rod speeds up, strengthens, and smooths out a Glock's slide travel AND reduces excessive polymer frame vibration.

Later on when the factory was finally forced to admit their original trigger bars were of a faulty design and came out with the new and improved #4256-1 trigger bars, ALL of my return-to-battery problems completely disappeared! Having learned my lesson, though, I kept the Wolff metal guide rod installed in my Glock; and, later on, I added Wolff Gunspring's metal rods to all of my 3rd generation Glocks. (They help with, 'front sight recapture' when firing at speed, too!) ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I just installed the 3.5# connector and the Wolf 6# spring. What a big difference! Now I wish I had a Dremel tool to do the 25 cent trigger job. I just might try doing it by hand. Thanks for all the tips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,322 Posts
I just installed the 3.5# connector and the Wolf 6# spring. What a big difference! Now I wish I had a Dremel tool to do the 25 cent trigger job. I just might try doing it by hand. Thanks for all the tips.
You can do an acceptable polishing job with Q-Tips and a piece of cloth (Terry towel is good) wrapped around the eraser on a wood lead pencil. For the tighter areas, wrap that cloth around the end of a small screw driver. The Dremel tool is best. For polishing cream, use either Flitz or Mother's. When you've finished, thoroughly wipe the polished surfaces off then lube them with your chosen product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the tips. I watched about 20 YouTube videos on how and what to polish. Today I did the polish job with Mother's and Q-Tips. I used a simple bath wash cloth to buff the parts. Everything shines like a new penny now. It was easier than I thought. Now I can't wait to get to the range to see how everything goes. I've installed the 3.5# connector, 6# spring, and polished everything. I'll post when I have a range report.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
sorry for the late post, but I'm after a 4.5# trigger pull on my gen 3 g-30sf as I have a little arthritis in my strong hand. This will be a carry gun so Im also concerned about the legality on messing with the innards of the gun in case of a defensive shooting.I have a glock 3.5# connector and a 6# spring. Could I end up with 4.5# with this change? What would I get with only adding the connector and using the stock spring? What is the rating of the stock spring anyway? Lastly ,are there any legal problems in changing to the smooth trigger?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,322 Posts
sorry for the late post, but I'm after a 4.5# trigger pull on my gen 3 g-30sf as I have a little arthritis in my strong hand. This will be a carry gun so Im also concerned about the legality on messing with the innards of the gun in case of a defensive shooting.I have a glock 3.5# connector and a 6# spring. Could I end up with 4.5# with this change? What would I get with only adding the connector and using the stock spring? What is the rating of the stock spring anyway? Lastly ,are there any legal problems in changing to the smooth trigger?
No. The best you can probably hope for with a 3.5 connector and a 6pound trigger spring, plus the internal polishing job, on a gen3 G30SF is probably going to be somewhere around 5 pounds 6 to 8 ounces. But please check your trigger bar. If yours has the protrusion (bump) on the outside of the striker block cam then that little bump is going to cause a little bit of friction. If not, your pull weight should come in a little lower. I have three gen3 compacts in my carry stable (two G23's and a G19) that all have these mods and come in at or slightly under 5 pounds.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top