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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been going through quite a few .357 Magnum rounds, and I think the next 1000 I want to load myself. Comparing the price- if I were to try to buy Winchester white box ammo from Wal-mart for about $17.5 per box, it would cost me $350 for 1000 rounds.

Or I could pickup bullets for about $100-150 for 1000, primers looks to be about $20. 1lb of accurate arms looks to be about $20, I have no idea how much powder I'd need for 1000 rounds, but 8lbs (surely enough?) looks to be about $120. I already have the 1000 winchester cases. So assuming the most expensive of those options, I'd still be saving about $10, and most deffinately getting higher quality ammo. Do these numbers sound reasonable? Roughly how much poweder would 1000 rounds of 357 Magnum require?

I'm tempted to buy one of the kits from midway to start my reloading. I could spend about $250 for this RCBS kit: http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=646599

Or I could hunt down everything I need separeley, and I imagine that would cost more than that kit. Any opinions?

L J
 

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A kit is OK. Do you have a mentor? I had a guy get me started and it helped a lot. Some things are a lot more important than others and someone experienced to help you is a great advantage.
 

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I would think you would need someone to at least give ya the 411 one time - to guide you so you know what you are doing/verify you are doing it right...
 

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You'll save a lot of money but you will spend a lot of time by yourself. A pound of power will last forever. Especially if you get to buying different powders for the same caliber. Find somebody locally to guide you as you start that has been doing it a while. Be very anal about your measurements and don't smoke while you're puttin' the powder in. :lol:
 

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DennyCrane said:
I would think you would need someone to at least give ya the 411 one time - to guide you so you know what you are doing/verify you are doing it right...
+1

Try to find someone to help you get started!!!
 

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Important! Check and double-check and maybe even triple-check all measurements, etc. (especially powder). Don't mean to make it sound like it's boring or dangerous, it's really a lot of fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I do know a few locals who are into reloading, have plans to talk to them. Anyways, I would like to hear opinions on the kit I have linked to. I'd still need to buy dies, a caliper, and a tumbler, and I think that would have everything I need to get started (minus bullets, powder, primer).

L J
 

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RCBS is a good brand. Buy a good caliper (I prefer digital). You might want to look at a digital scale for powder and bullet weight measurement 'cause they are a lot faster and more accurate. I think MidwayUSA sells one for $50 or so. A tumbler could come later as it is not critical to have shiny brass (old brass that's been in the weather needs cleaned, but if you pick up your brass right after you shoot you can go a long time without tumbling). Good luck and always go by the load books (not hearsay).
 

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Charlie said:
You might want to look at a digital scale for powder and bullet weight measurement 'cause they are a lot faster and more accurate.
I don't think that digital scales are any more accurate than the analog ones.

As for getting started, get 2 or 3 reloading books and READ them. The Rock Chucker is a great single stage press, I've been using mine for over 35 years.
 

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You know, they probably aren't but the digital are so much faster, and air conditioning, any movement on the bench, etc. can produce slight changes in the analog scales. I currently don't own a digital scale but a friend I load with has one and I really like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm not sure that a digital scale would be too much more accurate, than a good analog scale. I can see how it would be nicer than an Analog scale. However, for the price of a good digital scale I think I will most likely end up sticking with an analog scale - mainly 'cause that kit includes an analog scale.

L J
 

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I agree, especially if you're going with the kit. Later on you can always add a digital if you want. Advantage would be faster if you are measuring each load, but that's about it. You will probably find that like a lot of hobbies once you get started, there is always stuff you need to buy (kinda like buying guns :lol: ). Just make sure you dedicate enough room for all the stuff you will acquire (like maybe add a room onto your house :lol: ).
 

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Just pay someone in a 3rd world country to do it for you. It's the American way

[IMG:59:50:d61deb133d]http://weiweiworld.onestop.net/uglylol.gif[/img:d61deb133d]
 

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Ronnie J is on target. Remember if you order primers and/or powder from a supplier, you have to pay the Haz-Mat fee (sometimes more expensive than what you buy). If you can get a good deal locally, go ahead and invest in as much as you afford. Stuff ain't gonna' get no cheaper!!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I like the idea of buying powder/primers locally, unfortunately I don't (yet) know of any local suppliers. :(

Also, I am quite curious to know if anyone has a rough estimate for how many rounds of .357 Magnum 1lb of powder could load. I'll trust that it's over 1000, but I am curious to hear an estimate.

Have placed a Lyman manual and some mags on order. Have an offtopic question about mags- I have a Springfield Armory 1911 ultra-compact, which due to it's 3.5" grip classifies it as an officer weapon. I noticed the Springfield mags for an officer weapon only hold 6 rounds- however, I think every other company makeing 1911 officer mags held 7 rounds. Why doesn't Springfield make 7 rounds mags for the officer class weapons? I did place the Springfield mags on order mainly so they would be the same brand as the gun, and be fully compatiable, but I am curious to know about bullet number 7.

L J
 

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Your local reloader guys will know where to get the stuff locally. Are you sure Springfield doesn't make some 7 rounders? I thought I had seen some but I could be wrong. My Colt Defender is a shortened grip also and both that came with the gun are 7 rounders. Get some Wilsons or something if all else fails.
 

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logan85--- A pound of powder has about 7000 grains and depending on your bullet size, you have to adjust the amount of powder. According to Accurate Arms website a lb of powder will only load 1000 rds by using Accurate No. 2.
Using 173gr LSWC 6.5gr, 180gr LTCGC 5.9gr, and about 4 more bullet types.
I would also suggest getting a couple reloading books and reading first.

I have been reloading for about 4 months now and I love it. I reload 45ACP and 40S&W on a Dillon 550B. I, myself shoot both calibers but my carry weapon is the XD-45 Service and my wifes is the XD-40SC.

I have gotten my wife involved now and she reloads her 40 cal. rounds herself now, it is not that hard to learn but you have to pay attention to what you are doing.

We have reloaded over 2000 rds in 4 months and had about 6 missed charges causing the bullet to get stuck on the rifling as soon as it left the case. Only had to use a punch and hammer to get it out but goes to show you have to pay attention to what you do.

I hope this helps. :-D
 
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