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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another pistol my father-in-law wanted me to go through is his Hungarian FEG SMC. Built to the same dimensions as a PPK, and part for part, a pretty close copy. Mags are a bit different and it doesn’t have a loaded chamber indicator and it uses an alloy frame, but the parts are otherwise direct copies of the Walther.

7C6B9736-D013-4406-9C00-BD04AC7EB0E4.jpeg
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I've got an Interarms Walther PPK/S that I bought in the early 80's. It was my 3rd handgun. My 1st was a 1911 in .38 Super, my 2nd was an S&W Model 29, I still have all three. Mine's all steel, it's a well made gun but the DA trigger is God awful. It feels like it's got at least a 14 lb. pull? In fact it's advertised at 13.4 lbs. It has been pretty reliable though. The similarity between these two guns is indeed pretty close. I'm guessing that they're not an exact copy because of patent laws? My guess is that the parts would not be interchangeable except for maybe the springs? But I really don't know.

19937


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've got an Interarms Walther PPK/S that I bought in the early 80's. It was my 3rd handgun. My 1st was a 1911 in .38 Super, my 2nd was an S&W Model 29, I still have all three. Mine's all steel, it's a well made gun but the DA trigger is God awful. It feels like it's got at least a 14 lb. pull? In fact it's advertised at 13.4 lbs. It has been pretty reliable though. The similarity between these two guns is indeed pretty close. I'm guessing that they're not an exact copy because of patent laws? My guess is that the parts would not be interchangeable except for maybe the springs?

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I’m pretty sure you are correct about some parts. I know the mags don’t have the left side rib for the slide catch extension on the follower. There is evidence of some relief in the frame but, I’m not sure it is sufficient to get a Walther mag to work.

I did find out, as I did a little research, that FEG did have and agreement/partnership with Walther briefly and made a PPK variant for Walther that I’ve seen called the PPK/E. So, I would also guess they had some tooling around to do a proper PPK clone.

I will say from my experience with Walthers, that I’m sure a Walther PPKs parts fit a bit more precisely and exhibit a bit better finish.

The Hungarians did get the trigger pull to be exactly like Walther…horrendous DA pull with a pretty nice single action.
 

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I’m pretty sure you are correct about some parts. I know the mags don’t have the left side rib for the slide catch extension on the follower. There is evidence of some relief in the frame but, I’m not sure it is sufficient to get a Walther mag to work.

I did find out, as I did a little research, that FEG did have and agreement/partnership with Walther briefly and made a PPK variant for Walther that I’ve seen called the PPK/E. So, I would also guess they had some tooling around to do a proper PPK clone.

I will say from my experience with Walthers, that I’m sure a Walther PPKs parts fit a bit more precisely and exhibit a bit better finish.

The Hungarians did get the trigger pull to be exactly like Walther…horrendous DA pull with a pretty nice single action.
I never really looked into parts interchangeability until first reading your post. I just assumed that since it was a different manufacturer that they'd have to make some changes to their parts to comply with patent laws? Just as CZ parts are not interchangeable with Tanfoglio's CZ clones except for the magazines. The PPK/E looks identical to the Walther in every respect. I guess since they had a agreement/partnership with Walther I'd be willing to bet that all of the parts between those guns would be interchangeable? They even roll marked the Walther logo onto their slides and it's also on the grips. Even the plastic box that it came in looks the same. An interesting topic nonetheless.

My PPK/S is made in America by Interarms under license from Walther. From what I understand is that it's not as good as the original German made one? But all of the parts are identical in every respect. I never had the opportunity to compare the two. I do have a German made Walther Q4 SF and the fit, finish and lack of machining/tool marks is second to none.

Walther PPK /E unboxing and quick look 380ACP - YouTube
www.youtube.com › watch
Quick look on PPK/E version in 380 ACP
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think, (and this is strictly theory) there are a couple of factors that may come into play. Many Eastern European nations did not have patent agreements with other European countries and would copy things regardless of a copyright or patent already existing.

I do know there are some differences, such as the lack of loaded chamber indicator, which means the hammer isn’t notched either. The frame may not have the same relief for the Walther mags, and I’m not sure if the mags are compatible or not. Grip screw location may be slightly different as well. These changes could be the result of earlier partnership agreements and just enough to satisfy Walther.

I do know the SMC was the smallest pistol imported after the Gun Control Act of 1968 that restricted small handguns from coming in the country if they didn’t have enough “import points” based on dimensions and features.

The left grip panel of the SMC is wider with a modest thumb shelf to get it to the minimum 1.3” thickness to be legal for import.

I think some of the Interarms PPKs are fairly highly regarded compared to the S&W versions.
 

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I think, (and this is strictly theory) there are a couple of factors that may come into play. Many Eastern European nations did not have patent agreements with other European countries and would copy things regardless of a copyright or patent already existing.

I do know there are some differences, such as the lack of loaded chamber indicator, which means the hammer isn’t notched either. The frame may not have the same relief for the Walther mags, and I’m not sure if the mags are compatible or not. Grip screw location may be slightly different as well. These changes could be the result of earlier partnership agreements and just enough to satisfy Walther.

I do know the SMC was the smallest pistol imported after the Gun Control Act of 1968 that restricted small handguns from coming in the country if they didn’t have enough “import points” based on dimensions and features.

The left grip panel of the SMC is wider with a modest thumb shelf to get it to the minimum 1.3” thickness to be legal for import.

I think some of the Interarms PPKs are fairly highly regarded compared to the S&W versions.
As for S&W and Walther, this may be of interest:

  1. Walther. Carl Walther. | American Rifleman | Official Journal ...
    www.americanrifleman.org › content › walther-carl
    Sep 24, 2013 · Smith & Wesson partnered with Walther starting in 2002, and it was a relationship that included not only importation, distribution and marketing of Walther guns made in Ulm, but American production...

  1. Walther to Part Ways with Smith & Wesson :: Guns.com
    www.guns.com › news › 2012/06/29
    Jun 29, 2012 · “Smith & Wesson has been an outstanding partner and has represented theWalther brand in the U.S. with tremendous focus, effort and results. We look forward to many more years of strategic alliance...

  1. S&W and Walther Splitting
    www.gunsholstersandgear.com › 2012/06/30 › walther
    Jun 30, 2012 · S&W is the exclusive distributor of German-made Walther firearms, S&Wmanufactures and distributes Walther PPK pistols made in Houlden, ME, and; Walthermanufactures S&W M&P 22 pistols in Germany. Of these, only one is ending in 2013: Smith & Wesson’s importation and distribution of German-made Walther guns. That contract will expire on April 30, 2013.

  1. Walther Splits with Smith & Wesson. Mostly - The Truth About Guns
    www.thetruthaboutguns.com › walther-splits-smith
    Jun 29, 2012 · Smith & Wesson has been the distributor for Walther guns in US of A since 1999. No more. Walther announced that they’ll be setting up a newco stateside called WaltherArms, Inc. to take over distribution here. But the two aren’t totally splitsville.
 

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I've had a number of FEG pistols in the past, the 9mm Mak, 380, and a 32acp. At one time you could get them with a holster and an extra mag for about $150. I miss those days.
They're fun guns but at current prices that I've seen around here there are better choices.
 
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