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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is going to sound like a dumb question to all you veteran reloaders, but I was just wondering how a slow bullet is so much more accurate than a faster one. I have noticed when I shoot my 10/22 I seem to get better accuracy when I use 60 grain SS ammo rather than the 32 grain HV loads. It's not just my 10/22. Last time I was at a range with my Security Six, I shot both .357 mags and .38 specials, and the .38s out performed the .357s in the accuracy department.

Can anyone give me a simple answer?
 

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Maser, it's always been my impression that it was the reduced recoil that makes the gun more managable... There are other factors I'm sure but that is the biggest one, I think... :roll:
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was just doing a bit of reading on the subject and also it seems that the less velocity in a bullet then the less harmonic vibrations occur in the barrel thus making the barrel not vibrate as much as a high velocity bullet would. Think i'm going to stick with SS ammo from now on when I target shoot or plink.
 

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Maser, I think you will find as you shoot more guns, that the slowest bullet is not always more accurate. When it comes to 22lr target ammo,yes most of the time it will be more accurate but I have a 10/22 heavy barrel that shoots Winchester Power Point just as well. In center fire rounds, it really depends on the gun.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I agree that the slowest bullet wont always be the best and that holds true when shooting targets from long range. Higher velocity=flatter trajectory. I am speaking only from my experiences which is still on the novice level (but am learning) and I shoot at relativly close ranges when I target/plink shoot. I guess I am just one of those guys that believe if something works then don't try to fix it.

I will however take the time to read up some more on this subject.
 

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In all of my 9mm's, the 147 grain bullet has proved it's self to be the most accurate.
Seems like it in my .357 too. I'm not as sure with it though...
Never really shot any light stuff out of my .44 mag, so I can't say for it...
 

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It is not so much the velocity but rather the powder. In cartridges such as the .44 Magnum, accuracy seems better at the high end of performance.

Generally, it has to do with the pressure/travel curve. When a cartridge is fired, pressure begins to rapidly build up, but as the bullet travels down the bore, volume increases and pressure decreases. As the bullet nears the muzzle, ideally pressure should be near its lowest level, dropping to zero as the bullet exits.

Some slow burning powders have the pressure too high at the muzzle, and it is believed that this pressure "tips" the base of the bullet upon exiting the muzzle, causing some accuracy loss.

So barrel lenghth and powder burning rate seem to be the key to accuracy.

Bob Wright
 

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And further............

Time of flight is important also. In long range shooting, the quicker the bullet gets to the target, the less time gravity and wind have to act on it.

Also, heavier bullets are more resistant to wind currents and tend to stay on course a little better than the light ones.

Its always a compromise. The most aerodynamic bullet shape is usually not the ideal shape for the hunting bullet.

Bob Wright
 

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And still further.............

Yes, recoil plays an important function. Certainly not in a .22 rifle, but in centerfire handguns and rifles. Recoil does not affect ACCURACY, but it does affect MARKSMANSHIP. In shooting a handgun, the consistancy of the grip is an important factor, and lighter recoiling handguns are easier to maintain a consistant grip.


And concentration is THE most important key to accuracy. If heavy recoil disturbs this concentration, accuracy, or rather, marksmanship, will suffer.

Bob Wright
 

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Bob has some very good points here. I have noticed in my 44 magnums that the max loads always shot better than the light loads.
 
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