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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
I have been having a problem where I have been shooting my glock 22 and it has been grouping to the lower left, about 1 to 2 inches off point of aim. Could you guys tell me what I'm probably doing wrong, I have a slow fire pistol competition in the spring I would like to prepare for. Any other advice is more than welcome.

Thank You
 

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1. Bench rest the pistol to verify if your sights are on. Likewise, see if you can get center shots from the bench and carry that over to free standing.
2. Perhaps not enough trigger finger(G-22 has a fairly beefy grip), jerking or slapping the trigger instead of squeezing it, or tightening your fingers in anticipation of recoil. A slow straight back trigger squeeze all the while isolating the trigger finger and keeping your sights on target. Anticipation of recoil is a big one that can mess you up, it does me on occasion.
 

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This is a typical problem, probably caused by something called "milking" the gun.
(My explanation assumes that you're right-handed. If you're not right-handed, my explanation is incorrect and won't help you.)

"Milking" means that you are not isolating your trigger finger. That is, as your trigger finger squeezes your pistol's trigger, all of your other fingers also squeeze at the same time. This all-finger squeeze rotates your pistol to the left, and downward-not much, but just enough.
If you try dry-firing at a blank wall, and watch what your gun's muzzle does as you squeeze the trigger, you will see this small movement.
("Dry fire": Absolutely no ammunition anywhere, in the gun or even in the same room.)

The, um, cure for "milking" is pretty simple: You need to concentrate upon two separate things at the same time. Yeah, simple. Sure.
First grip your gun's handle tighter. Use what I call "the death grip." Grab it, and hold it really, really tightly. Maintain that really tight grip.
At exactly the same time, leave your index finger loose. Do not grip with it. Wiggle it a little-without changing your grip on the gun.

OK, let's put it all together. Grab the pistol with your "death grip." Now, use only your index finger, and press the gun's trigger straight to the rear.
Do not "squeeze" that trigger. Press it. Press straight to the rear. When the gun goes "click" (that is, it "fires"), don't release anything. This is called "follow through."

Practice doing that, maybe five minutes a day for at least a week. Then go shooting, use the new technique, and see if there's been a change.
 

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This is a common occurrence with Glock pistols, in particular with people new to this brand. If you are allowed to install after market sights, I would do that as the basic OEM Glock sights leave a lot to be desired.

However more often than not, this problem does not entirely result from the OEM sights but rather what you see in the charts that Cait43 posted above in post #4. Pay attention to those depictions and do a lot of trigger discipline practice at home with an empty gun. Work on your trigger engagement, press, and break. And if you are allowed to alter the trigger in your competition, consider doing this. I modify all of my Glock triggers to obtain the trigger I want since several of these guns are in my primary carry stable (one of them is my EDC gun).
 

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If you dry-fire, you will be able to see the movement in the sights at the moment the striker releases.

Practice dry-firing (in a safe area, with a double-checked clear pistol) until the sights do not move when the striker releases. Once you have it mastered in dry-fire, you need to transfer it to live-fire (can be harder than you might think). Once you "get it" and ingrain the good habits, you'll be good to go.
 
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