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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Years ago, a tech guy at the NRA showed me how to convert my Ruger Security-Sixes to round butt. All it took was round-but grips, a thing Sharpie marker and a grinder. He had originally purchased a Smith & Wesson 19, but after 2,000 or so rounds of hot .357, he needed a re-timing. After another 2,000 or so more hot rounds, the frame fatigue was such that he had to retire the gun. So he got a Ruger Security-Six and, since then, has put many thousands of hot rounds through it with no parts replacements being needed.







I rounded my grips on my 2.75- and 4-inch Security-Sixes, but didn't on my 6-inch. I felt the balance would be all wrong. But I'm curious to find out if anyone else has done this. It's worked out well for me. I love my Security-Sixes and despise the current .357s with the large frames and underlug barrels. They're fine for range guns and competition, but horrible for camping, hiking and fishing. Back in the 70s and 80s, gun magazines did articles on the Rugers and the Smith model 66 with 6-inch barrels, often in the snow or rain to highlight the stainless steel's resistance to such. Alas, I never, ever, even once, saw a Model 66 on a dealer's shelf. But Rugers were all over the place where I was going to school in Utah. I did find a brand new Model 13, which I bought; however, several days later they got in a Security-Six 6-inch in stainless steel for a few dollars less, so I went back and exchanged it. Looking back, it was a mistake. Not because the Ruger wasn't a better gun, but because I never saw another 13!

The Ruger Security-Six is still the best .357 the company ever built, in my view, and it's far better than the GP-100, which in my opinion is a boat anchor. I love the round-butt grips, though.

 

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I am a HUGE fan of the Security-Six series revolvers, having used them for many years in local police-PPC-type combat competitions. When I was young-ish (1980s-90s), I kicked some serious butt in the local circuit with several of these handguns, but I've reluctantly converted to the GP-100 series handguns now, for one simple reason: parts availability.

About a decade ago, I contacted Ruger about getting a part for one of my Sec6 revolvers, and I was told that certain parts were no longer available, and they wouldn't be making anymore of them. For the occasional shooter, this isn't a problem, but for high-volume shooters or folks that pound a lot of magnum loads through their wheelguns, you HAVE to be able to get parts, because stuff is DEFINITELY going to break or wear-out over time. I reluctantly sold my last few Sec6/Speed6/Service6 revolvers, and picked up a few GP-100-style replacements, then got them tweaked the way I wanted them. They work fine, only weigh a few ounces more, and I will be able to get parts for them for the rest of my shooting "life".

As I said above, low-volume shooters don't have to worry about this as much, and rich folks (I'm not) can always have a talented pistolsmith MAKE whatever parts they need if they break something or wear it out. I was really sad to see the Sec6 revolvers get replaced by the GP-series, but they are durable and reliable replacements, and are carrying-on the Ruger DA revolver reputation in a fine fashion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I am a HUGE fan of the Security-Six series revolvers, having used them for many years in local police-PPC-type combat competitions. you HAVE to be able to get parts, because stuff is DEFINITELY going to break or wear-out over time. I reluctantly sold my last few Sec6/Speed6/Service6 revolvers, and picked up a few GP-100-style replacements, then got them tweaked the way I wanted them.
I can appreciate your love for Security-Sixes, but which parts needed replacements? I know a man who has shot many thousands of rounds through his Security-Six and he's yet to need any repairs, so I'm curious, war it your barrel? Forcing cone? You obviously shoot quite a bit.



One of my favorite guns is a .38Spc Speed-Six that I had reamed out to take .357. I can drop a 125gr JHP bullet into each chamber and they catch without falling through, so he did a great job. (It's one of the most accurate guns I have.) I've always wanted a stainless Service-Six, but I also want a mint S&W 13. Even though the Rugers are tougher guns, the S&W is a more elegant revolver. I used to recommend them for drawer guns tio people who wanted a nice classy revolver. If they were going to shoot them, I'd recommend Rugers, as S&W 65s just weren't available.

How do you like the underlugs on .357s these days?

Did you keep any of your S6 revolvers?

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I wanted a "spare" hand (the part that rotates the cylinder to the next chamber), as the timing on one of my revolvers was lagging just a little bit, and I was afraid they might stop selling parts for them and I'd be stuck with an out-of-time handgun (or a big bill from a custom gunsmith to get it running again). At that point, they still had the part I needed, but didn't want to send it out to me, as it had to be fitted to work correctly (Ruger requires a lot of critical parts be replaced at the factory). In talking with the service representative, I was told they were already out of a few Sec6 parts, and were low on others.

As I was basically winding-down my competitive revolver shooting around that time, I just converted over to GP100 wheelguns for the few defensive/walkabout revolvers I wanted to keep around, and I sold or traded the Sec6 models as they are always easy to move (a lot of fans of that design out there). I no longer have any Sec6-based revolvers, but I still shoot one that my friend owns every now and then.

The GP100 models have a heavier "lugged" barrel, but I'm not a huge fan of that on most .38s/.357s.
You MUST have it on a Colt Python or Diamondback, but for everything else, it's optional.
 

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Nice job on the modification. Good looking Ruger!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I understand why DJ would need a GP100 instead of a Security-Six, but for most of us, a Security-Six or Speed-Six would be a viable purchase. I think they're one of the best designed guns ever produced. I couldn't decide which barrel length was best, so I got one in each barrel length.



I rounded the grips on the 2.75-inch model. Don't know why Bill Ruger didn't do that. Round-butt grips will always take square butt Pachmayrs, but the opposite isn't true.



The SP101 5-shot .357 is quite a bit smaller and lighter than the 6-shot Speed-Six. The factory grips, while attractive, aren't comfortable when shooting magnum loads.



The design of the Security-Six is brilliant. It can be easily disassembled and reassembled. And I think it's more beautiful than the GP100.





This Speed-Six started of as a .38 Special, but was reamed out to take .357s. It was very well designed and easily carried. Many people who couldn't find S&W revolvers bought Rugers that actually lasted much longer than their forged steel competition. Which was odd considering S&W's ads to the contrary.



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That was the gun I wanted in the early 80s. A little out of my budget then so I got a blued Ruger Speed Six in 38 Special.
 
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