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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so here's my question(s)...

When I listen or see firearm instructors giving pointers on shooting, it's always... hold it like this, stand like that, etc. Which all are very important, not saying it's anything else, I treasure all I've learned thus far...but for self/home defense, is their another way to better prepare or train for that kind of situation?
 

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Technique and Training

The battle has been raging a long time as to what is the "Best" stance, grip, etc., Iso, Weaver, Chapman, etc. After 20+ years in Law Enforcement I've seen lots of instructors come and go, many claiming superiority in practice and technique.

I've found that it really dosen't matter what you call it as long as it works well for you. Some shooters do better with one, while others are more proficient with another. I think some of the difference has to do with an individuals body type/structure (build, musculature, agility, mobility, etc.), and their individual ability to incorporate a given technique to their physical limitations (and we all have limitations).

When I see someone who is of a similar build(heavy, thin, medium etc.), and is able to consistently perform at a high level, I observe to see if they're doing something that might aid in my own practice. Not to say that I would just abandon all my prior training and experience, but just be open to new ideas and techniques. I will try them later when I'm able to see how they work for me, sometimes I keep them and sometimes I discover they just don't work well for me.

I guess what I'm suggesting is that you continue to use the solid base you've acquirred (stable platforms, mobile platforms, grips, etc.), and mix the practice (stationary shooting, moving drills, cover and concealment, etc.) relying on the techniques that prove to be effective for you.

In a home /self defense situation there no "BEST" rule or technique, simply because you never know what the circumstances might be when/if an incident happens. Therefore its best to practice a variety of skills and try to remain fluid and flexible in your approach. If you are able to limit the variables in a "self-defense" scenario, then your ahead of the game and able to somewhat plan your strategy, but normally we don't have the luxury of foreknowledge, just the foresight to train and be as prepared as possible.
Good Luck
 

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Yes, always use cover.

And, if U have a home intruder - do not try to clear the house. Stay put and guard your current location (bedroom door) until police arrive.
 

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The old farm house we moved into only had one phone location. I had to sweep a good portion of the house to get to my phone to make my 911 call...

1. Have a phone (we do now!) in your "safe" location...
2. Have a plan in case you need to sweep. Like make all left (or right) turns to sweep your way to where you need to go. (this may not be good advice, because it's a firefighter search technique, not a swat technique)
 

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Take your Lazyboy recliner to the range and pratice with the tv remote in the other hand. If you can change channels and hit a bullseye you are safe at home. It works for me. You know your good when you can TIVO and shoot.
 

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Well, I'm not officially an instructor, BUT I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

My advice is always to concentrate on sight alignment and trigger control. Once a novice starts hitting the target, grip, stance and all other things will fall into place.

But, until concentration is developed, its all down the tubes. Once concentration is mastered, then work on stressful situations.

Bob Wright
 

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Bob Wright said:
Well, I'm not officially an instructor, BUT I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

My advice is always to concentrate on sight alignment and trigger control. Once a novice starts hitting the target, grip, stance and all other things will fall into place.

But, until concentration is developed, its all down the tubes. Once concentration is mastered, then work on stressful situations.

Bob Wright
+1 Front sight, press........
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would have to say to practice at a tactical shooting range. I never been to a professional range like that, but here they are uber fun. My friends and I have set up a pretty impressive tactical area around the area where we shoot at. We got many sheets of plywood as cover and even made a cool raised enclosure with simulates firing at a 2nd story window. We have been talking about in the summer we are going to rig up some moving targets and popups.

LOL!! Who says Cali is not a fun haven for tactical shooters.
 

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When plinking at the range, I'll fire my usual 200+ rounds towards tight groups in my usual Isosceles stance. As I get close to ending my range session, I will do one or more of the following:

1. Shoot 10-15 rounds with my left hand.
2. Shoot 10-15 rounds in a Weaver stance with both arms bent, left shoulder forward.
3. Shoot 10-15 rounds with just my right hand, right shoulder forward.

At home, when no one is around, I clear my gun and attach the laser/light thing. Then I go around and point the gun without really aiming. Somewhat like a point and shoot move. Then I'll hold it and flick the laser on and see how off I was from what I was pointing to. If I keep doing this, I figure my point and shoot skills will get more accurate.
 

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I'm going to compete in my first USPSA match next weekend. It should be a real eye opener. I've talking about it for a few years, finially got up the nerve to try it. Its about a 2hr drive from where I live so it shouldn't be too bad to shoot a couple this summer. They also do IDPA at the same range. There is another range within 45min of me that also shoots USPSA every month.
 

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jwkimber45 said:
I'm going to compete in my first USPSA match next weekend. It should be a real eye opener. I've talking about it for a few years, finially got up the nerve to try it. Its about a 2hr drive from where I live so it shouldn't be too bad to shoot a couple this summer. They also do IDPA at the same range. There is another range within 45min of me that also shoots USPSA every month.
What exactly is that? I have head about it but never been any kind of compitition
 
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