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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a Sig P239 over 15 years ago, and have always carried the Corbon 135 gr. JHP ammo in it for self defense. I bought my baby Glock 27 a little over 5 years ago when I received my first CCW permit. I've carried the same load (Corbon 135 gr JHPs) for the last 5 years in the G27. Lately I've been considering the new Corbon 140 gr. DPX or the Speer Gold Dot 165 gr JHPs. So I would appreciate your guys Opinion on the whether to keep using the same Corbon 135 gr. JHP 40 S&W ammo for concealed carry / self defense in my Glock 27 & Sig P239 .40 S&W, or switch to the Corbon 140 gr. DPX or the Speer Gold Dot JHPs?
Thanks for your input,
Oddball
 

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I have generally been a fan of either Federal Premium HST or Speer Gold Dot JHPs in all the center-fire pistol calibers I shoot (9mm Luger, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP) but I currently have Hornady 165 grain Critical Defense loaded in my Beretta Cougar 8040F. I will likely go with Federal 180gr HST next time around, however.

If you have not seen this ballistic testing it might be of interest to you particularly since the .40 S&W test pistol happened to be a Glock 27:

Handgun Self-Defense Ammunition - Ballistic Testing Data

If you believe this data I would probably stay away from the Speer Gold Dot 165gr Gold Dot since it completely failed to expand and over-penetrated. The Speer 180gr GDs did pretty well, however. Federal 180gr HST had good expansion and penetration. The Hornady 165gr Critical Defense did OK but the 175 grain Critical Duty failed to expand reliably. I was a little surprised by the Remington 180gr results which had excellent expansion and decent penetration.
 

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I generally think any of the newer defense-oriented loads should work just fine, and I generally pick mine by what is available locally (or online) at a reasonable price, as I plan to actually shoot it regularly for practice. Although I used to use lighter bullets in the .40 subcompact pistols, now I generally go with full-weight loads that demonstrate some level of expansion when fired through a short barrel. 180 PDX, HST in either 165 or 180 gr. weight, or 180 gr. Gold Dots are all good for my intended uses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
pblanc, that's the very data I saw that put doubt in my head about the Speer Gold Dot 165gr ammo. I found out something though, the boxes of ammo I purchased are labeled LE. I discovered that supposedly Speer had two different loading's for that that 165gr bullet. The boxes marked 23969 velocities were rated at 1050 fps. The boxes marked 23970 were loaded at 1150 fps. So right now I'm unsure of them until I find any data that's more positive, or do some of my own testing. For now I'm going to stick with my Corbons. Thanks for the advice and input guys.
Thanks,
Oddball:smt1099
 

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The 40 was designed around the 180 gr. bullet. Any JHP that you've tested for function in your gun is a good one. For that caliber, I don't use anything lower than 165 gr. Lighter-weight bullets may give impressive-sounding velocities, but you don't get something for nothing. Ammo manufacturers know that some people are impressed with higher velocity figures. A lighter bullet going faster has the same energy as a heavier bullet going slower.
 

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Shoot the one that is 1) The most reliable in your gun 2) the one that you can control the best 3) get the best bullet placement with 4) recover the best for a follow up shot.

A 135g bullet that you can place in the right place and then score with a fast followup shot trumps all those others. If that's the recoil level you're used to I'd vote for sticking there - shorter learning curve.

I carry a 1911, but my bullets are 185, not 200 or 230 because I can control the 185's better and get back on target faster. Bullet placement trumps bullet style.
 

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The 40 was designed around the 180 gr. bullet. Any JHP that you've tested for function in your gun is a good one. For that caliber, I don't use anything lower than 165 gr. Lighter-weight bullets may give impressive-sounding velocities, but you don't get something for nothing. Ammo manufacturers know that some people are impressed with higher velocity figures. A lighter bullet going faster has the same energy as a heavier bullet going slower.
only because the 10mm was designed around the 180gr bullet and the .40 was just a shorter version. find out later that the 165gr bullet in .40(when loaded to SAAMI spec) actually produces more kinetic energy. 468ftlbs (at muzzle) vs. 408ftlbs for the 180gr bullet for the HST's.

I run the federal HST's for defense loads in all my calibers...165 in my .40's

by large, the HST's seem to be one of the most reliable and consistant in the research that I have seen.

check out ballistics 101...fascinating site...ballistics on tons of stuff. that buffalo bore stuff is crazy.

if you believe in the thoery of hydrostatic shock (as I do) then the threshold of impact energy to impart into a human threat to neutralize them is in the realm of 500ftlbs+ so the closer you can get to that and still control your firearm well, the better IMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes that ballistics 101 is a good sight, I've checked it out many times. If I decide to go with a 165 gr round to use in my short barreled Glock 27, what would be a bullet where I would get reliable expansion? I thought I had chose a good round when I got some Speer Gold Dot 165gr cartridges at 1150 fps. I think that was out of a 4 inch barrel though. So thanks for all the input and opinions, and any more that you all can give me would be much appreciated. I run into conflicting information sometimes, and don't know what to believe. And on top of that, most of the ballistic info I find, longer barreled guns or test barrels were used. I'm not LE, just a carrying for self defense so I might not need quite as much penetration as they do but? Anyway thanks again for all the help!:smt1099
 

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The 40 was designed around the 180 gr. bullet. Any JHP that you've tested for function in your gun is a good one. For that caliber, I don't use anything lower than 165 gr. Lighter-weight bullets may give impressive-sounding velocities, but you don't get something for nothing. Ammo manufacturers know that some people are impressed with higher velocity figures. A lighter bullet going faster has the same energy as a heavier bullet going slower.
I tend to like the heavier bullets in .40 as well. I usually use a Remington JHP in 180 grain...I want the penetration, and heavier bullets tend to do that better than lighter ones, at least in a JHP configuration.
 

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Howdy,

Pick whatever bullet/load/ammo you want and/or can find. It really doesn't matter. Numerous PD and branches of the Fed Gov't, state police, ect have used about every load available and all have had good results with the .40S&W. It is a known and proven man stopper.

Unlike the 9mm, the .40S&W does NOT need a "magic bullet" to perform properly.

I've been carry a .40S&W since 1991 and have settled for Remington Golden Sabre 180gr JHP. It's a good round IMO because it's hotter than some of the 180gr loads but isn't as recoil snappy as some of the 155-165gr loads.

Heck, I spent 15 years carrying the old Win Black Talon 180gr load and only stopped carrying them because they were getting old. Eventhough the +20yo BT still have the same velocity now as they did when they were new.

Also the Rem GS is a little hotter than the old BT.

HTH, just my $.02 and your mileage MAY vary.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well I've been using the 135 gr. Corbon JHPs for years. With all the uproar about the penetration issue I bought 200 rounds of Speer Gold Dot 165 gr. ammo. Now I read there's a possible problem with that particular round of ammo that I chose of not expanding and over-penetrating. So I don't know whether to use those for carry or just use them to practice with, and try to find something else that would work better or just stick with the Corbons I've carried for years. Thanks again for all of your input,:?
 

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My preferred loads in the .40S&W for my carry .40 caliber pistols are, in no particular order, the Speer Gold Dot 165 grain higher velocity load, #53970 and the Federal 165 grain HST load. The Gold Dot I mentioned clocks in at 1150 fps muzzle velocity out of a four inch barrel with 484 ft/lbs of energy. The Federal HST comes in just slightly slower at 1130 fps. Both of these are outstanding loads with proven street records. The Federal is my summer time load whereas the Gold Dot is my winter load.
 

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There usually is a significant difference in POI between bullets with that much weight difference. I would choose the bullet weight whose POI is closest to POA, and not worry much about the difference in hollow point bullets, since bullet placement is much more important, anyway. My .40 S&W shoots to POA with 180 grain bullets - that doesn't mean yours will, though.
 
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