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I am looking into purchasing my first handgun. As always price is the concern, but i want the best that i can get for my money. To break it down i would like a good carry gun with great reliability, and also would like an auto not a revolver yet. my local gun shop has a Ruger sr40c that i can pick up for about 300. Any opinions on that. "shoot" away kinda want to hear from the masses and your opinions and what you guys shoot. Thanks in adavance
 

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Welcome... yours is a question that comes up quite often, and I have saved a response that I typed enough, to warrant copying and pasting.....


This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry/plinking gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.

There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Usmcj thank you for your response. Obviously you have put time and thought into not only shooting but helping people like me. I will try just that as far as holding and handling many types. i will update when the decision is made. again thank you and all that have postef
 

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If this works for you, I have some advice that worked well for a co-worker. She went to the NRA headquarters and took an extensive gun use and safety course. Of course we can't all make it to the NRA (although if given a chance the museum is AWESOME), but there are plenty of reputable dealers and gun shows that offer courses. She then found a range that rented several types of revolvers and pistols. After a number of trips and shooting several of each with different ammo, she was able to make a relatively informed purchase. I think the biggest advantage for her was that the range folks had no vested interest in making a sale so the info she received was fairly unbiased; opinion none the less, but not a sales pitch.
 

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Welcome... yours is a question that comes up quite often, and I have saved a response that I typed enough, to warrant copying and pasting.....

This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry/plinking gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

i the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.

There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....
I agree completely, unfortunately there is no perfect gun for everyone. It also depends on what you consider the right size to carry is.. I prefer pocket carry, for some applications .(smallest of the small guns) such as the Kel tec p3at size. Others I will carry a Kahr k9, and say for general hiking rugar p95 or p89 but hey I am partial to 9mm variants of ammo, just my personal preference..
 

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The SR40c is a nice gun and 300 bucks is a great deal if it is anywhere near good shape. The SR40c I know of is reliable, accurate and runs bullets through it like you ant your gun too. That is my buddy bob's gun. I am not saying you will have the luck he does but there is never a time anyone asks what should they get, he doesn't tell them how much he likes his carry piece.

RCG
 

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Cant say much more than USMCJ did or any of the other fine folks here, but I can chime in that the Ruger SR platform is a well designed & manufactured item. The .40S&W is a very capable round for self-defense and $300 is a great price. All of that doesnt mean a thing if it "just doesnt work" for you. I know so many people swear by Glocks and I am enamored of their simplicity, ruggedness, etc - but they "just dont work" for me.

Bottom line this time - buy the gun, if it "doesnt work" for you I bet you wouldnt have any problem selling it at a slight profit even :)
 

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Same here on info that USMCJ said handle much as you can if you are able to go to a range that rents try a few out the one that fits your hand you will know when you find it it will be hard to put it down lol. Good Luck on Shopping. Besafe

JBarL
 

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My two cents on this will be to try as many of them as possible and then choose the one that is comfortable in your hands, coupled with the fact that you can purchase it and maintain it without breaking the bank. Don't be afraid to start of with a lower end handgun and work your way up to what you really want.
 

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My take is this: A .40 caliber in a smallish handgun might slow the learning curve for a new shooter. I think a 9mm would make a better first weapon. It has less recoil, and it is cheaper to shoot.

I've been shooting since 1978, but when I moved up to Dutchess County they made me re-apply for a permit. Since I didn't know anyone up that neck of the woods I waited three years before I got my license again. I started out with a Glock 27 in .40 caliber and it took some time for me to reaquaint myself to the recoil. So I had 30 years of experience and a 3 year layoff and I had to re-learn how to deal with recoil. I would think a beginner would have a much harder time.

I think a 9mm Ruger or even a .380 Cougar or a .380 Cheetah would be a better first weapon. You can easily trade them in on a heavier caliber later on. These are mid-sized double stack .380s with a bit of heft to dull the recoil. Both are very nice; the Stoeger Cougar is cheaper than the Beretta Cheetah. (I hope I didn't confuse those names. Someone will correct me if I did.)
 

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Every one around here sure has "an opinion" :anim_lol:

My overall advice is if money is tight (always) Then

" buy a high quality USED gun before you buy a inexpensive lower quality NEW gun"

I've never had a lot of good luck with less expensive guns.

JMHO

:smt1099
 

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welcome from az. i'm not familiar with ruger's but small can be a handful until you acquire a touch.

smallest i've carried is a glock 27/40 & it was replaced with a g30/45.
 

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Bearone2
Don't mention that you are not familiar with Ruger while traveling through Prescott AZ cause thats where they are made...shoot safe and stay well...JJ
 
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