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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today has been the first time in about six months that I made a trip to the range. I had some new pistols I wanted to try and my M1 Garand was finally coming out of it's case to shoot for the first time since I got it at about this time last year. I also had to get a red dot mounted on my AR-15 (the boresighting will be next week see below) and start planning to get my act together to get back to shooting there more often.

The range was busy for a Sunday. I arrived just after opening and there already waits for lanes. Turns out someone scheduled two License to Carry Shooting Qualifier classes at the same time. Then there were groups of people there using a Groupon that the range had set up.

I could drag this out into some long spheal about my time at the range, but that would be boring. Instead, let me nutshell it for you.

I have a Springfield XD 45 that I was going to use as my carry gun, but after its poor showing I'm going to give it one more box of 50 and then decide to either ditch it or keep it. Part of it's poor showing may have been the fact that I was tired after about four hours of sleep and had forgotten all about the basic stance, grip and things of that nature when shooting handguns after six months. I may need to take a basic handgun class again at the range just to get back to normal.

I determined that I'm either going to need to get some work done on the front sight of my CZ 52. That front sight post is very narrow and my almost 42 year old eyes are not able to see it that well. I still like the 7.62 x 25 cartridge and don't see it becoming a safe queen any time soon. Can't dry fire practice with it though because the firing pin is too fragile.

I also finally got off my ass and took my Garand to the range. It was a thing of beauty once I figured out that you needed to take the safe off when you load the clip (not magazine, clip) I only brought five of them and it worked well. I've also got to practice loading those clips though because I had the bolt stick halfway closed, and that was square on me and my not checking to make sure all the ammo was seated properly. The upside was no Garand Thumb. Plus I have a new catch phrase when I shoot it. At the last shot I call out "Here comes the ping." I think I may make that my catch phrase in general.
 

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When loading a Garand "cold" (not during a fire-fight), the safety should be ON.
The old term was: "Lock and load." Lock first, then load.
If you can't load it with its safety ON, there's something wrong.

To avoid "Garand thumb":
•Place the rifle's butt into your right-side hip joint, and stabilize it with your left hand somewhere on the middle or forward handguard.
•Pull back on the operating-rod handle with your right hand until the bolt locks open.
•Insert the loaded clip.
•Press the op-rod handle toward the rifle's butt with the fleshy bottom edge of your right hand, while you press the clip down into the action with the ball of your right thumb.
•As soon as the clip locks into place, quickly pull your entire right hand up and away from the action.
•If the bolt does not immediately slam forward, hit the back side of the op-rod handle with your right hand, making it go forward.
 
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I have a Springfield XD 45 that I was going to use as my carry gun, but after its poor showing I'm going to give it one more box of 50 and then decide to either ditch it or keep it. Part of it's poor showing may have been the fact that I was tired after about four hours of sleep and had forgotten all about the basic stance, grip and things of that nature when shooting handguns after six months. I may need to take a basic handgun class again at the range just to get back to normal.
Get some instruction and practice.

If you can't shoot an XD45 with consistency, you aren't likely to do any better by switching guns. Gripping it properly determines whether you will have movement of your trigger finger that is independent from the rest of your body - a necessity for accurate shooting. A proper two handed grip should lock you up like a vise, allowing you to keep your sights on the target while your trigger finger eases into the trigger break. Follow through - keep your sights on the target for as long as you can, till the recoil moves you off of it. If you are doing it right, your sights should come right back onto the target for another shot. Try loading only two or three cartridges into the magazine and moving closer, until your impacts are consistent. Make each shot precisely, before firing again. Speeding up your follow-up shots will come naturally, once you calm down and know you can hit where you aim. Each shot is a precision series of movements that will begin to come naturally, after enough successful executions. It's all about how fast you can hit the target - not how fast you can miss the target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was thinking along those same lines after I made the post. I do need to get some help and that is why I am going to be taking a NRA Basic Pistol class this Saturday and will hopefully get some of the kinks worked out.

I was also feeling rushed a little even though the range I go to has a $20 shoot all day lane rental fee. I just need to slow down and get back to basics.

Thank you Bisley.
 

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You are welcome - I'm no expert, but this is about handgun fundamentals, and you have to develop them before you can move on to the finer points that make good shooters into great shooters.
 
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