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Well, after 14 months, I got this in FINALLY.

The John Wick 2 Combat Master



I went and shot it yesterday. I had a few issues in the first few rounds. But, then switched from 115gr ammo to 124grain ammo - as I know some guns have issues with lower powered ammo, and they need something hotter to break in with. After 50 rounds of 124gr, I went back to 115gr, and I had NO issues.

So, I fired 200 rounds in total yesterday. Fantastic gun to shoot. Easily the most accurate handgun I own. Their trigger work is excellent. Best Glock trigger I have ever felt. Should be just under 3lbs.

Also, they reshaped the grip a little, along with the texturing. The stock G17/34/45 grip is just a tiny big too big for my hands. Not anymore, on this gun. When comparing my stock Glock 34 to this gun, it looks like they took some of the thickness off on the front strap.

Recoil - wow. TTI lightens the slide, and then they spring the gun very lightly - so it is about as light as you can get and still work. When I saw the videos of Taran Butler talking about how he cuts down on recoil with this setup, I didn't really believe it much, as I have had 14 months to think about it while I waited....

When you see the videos of them shooting, the gun doesn't appear to move any less in their hands. But damn, when you shoot it - it is true. His setup really works... The recoil is very noticeably less than a stock Glock 34.

I have a slight tremor in my left hand, and usually after I shoot 150 rounds of 9mm in a handgun, my hands are shaking a bit more. Not with this gun. I fired 200 rounds though it. And if not for ammo prices, I would have fired another 200.

I was shooting one hole most of the time...

While waiting on this gun (for 14 months) - I had decided that if I didn't love this Taran Tactical gun, I could sell it and easily make $1k off of it. I'll admit, that's not why I sent it off - as I really wanted it for a year or two before I bit the bullet to get it...

But, if I knew that if I didn't like it, I figured I was going to use the money and just get the 9mm Ed Brown 1911 I have been wanting for several years. However, after shooting this gun yesterday - I'm not going to bother. This John Wick gun shoots as well as that $3k Springfield Custom Shop 9mm Operator I had way back in 2008. I don't see the need to spend $3200 on another handgun. This will be my one very nice handgun, and I'm good with that...

I too thought it was overpriced for what it was, but got it anyway. However, after shooting it yesterday, I will say it was worth it.











 

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Well, after 14 months, I got this in FINALLY.

The John Wick 2 Combat Master



I went and shot it yesterday. I had a few issues in the first few rounds. But, then switched from 115gr ammo to 124grain ammo - as I know some guns have issues with lower powered ammo, and they need something hotter to break in with. After 50 rounds of 124gr, I went back to 115gr, and I had NO issues.

So, I fired 200 rounds in total yesterday. Fantastic gun to shoot. Easily the most accurate handgun I own. Their trigger work is excellent. Best Glock trigger I have ever felt. Should be just under 3lbs.

Also, they reshaped the grip a little, along with the texturing. The stock G17/34/45 grip is just a tiny big too big for my hands. Not anymore, on this gun. When comparing my stock Glock 34 to this gun, it looks like they took some of the thickness off on the front strap.

Recoil - wow. TTI lightens the slide, and then the spring the gun very lightly - so it is about as light as you ca get and still work. When I saw the videos of Taran Butler talking about how he cuts down on recoil with this setup, I didn't really believe it much, as I have had 14 months to think about it while I waited....

When you see the videos of them shooting, the gun doesn't appear to move any less in their hands. But damn, when you shoot it - it is true. His setup really works... The recoil is very noticeably less than a stock Glock 34.

I have a slight tremor in my left hand, and usually after I shoot 150 rounds of 9mm in a handgun, my hands are shaking a bit more. Not with this gun. I fired 200 rounds though it. And if not for ammo prices, I would have fired another 200.

I was shooting one hole most of the time...

While waiting on this gun (for 14 months) - I had decided that if I didn't love this Taran Tactical gun, I could sell it and easily make $1k off of it. I'll admit, that's not why I sent it off - as I really wanted it for a year or two before I bit the bullet to get it...

But, if I knew that if I didn't like it, I figured I was going to use the money and just get the 9mm Ed Brown 1911 I have been wanting for several years. However, after shooting this gun yesterday - I'm not going to bother. This John Wick gun shoots as well as that $3k Springfield Custom Shop 9mm Operator I had way back in 2008. I don't see the need to spend $3200 on another handgun. This will be my one very nice handgun, and I'm good with that...

I too thought it was overpriced for what it was, but got it anyway. However, after shooting it yesterday, I will say it was worth it.











Guns like that are not overpriced when you consider the time that was put into it. Especially when you consider that labor probably goes for between $75-$100 an hour. If they spent 20 hours on that gun that's $1,500-$2,000 in labor costs alone. Indeed you probably could get more than what you paid for it due to supply, demand and the fact that not too many people would want to wait 14 months to get their gun back. Congratulations, now you've got a unique custom gun that not everyone has.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Guns like that are not overpriced when you consider the time that was put into it. Especially when you consider that labor probably goes for between $75-$100 an hour. If they spent 20 hours on that gun that's $1,500-$2,000 in labor costs alone. Indeed you probably could get more than what you paid for it due to supply, demand and the fact that not too many people would want to wait 14 months to get their gun back. Congratulations, now you've got a unique custom gun that not everyone has.
Yea, just the amount of time put into the texturing of the grip seems like it would have been a day.

Well, I would do it again, so I can't complain... Other than the fact it was listed at 20-25 weeks when I sent it in. And, it became 14 months :D
 

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Looks great and sounds like it shoots great as well. It was worth the wait. When something works that well it is worth the price. 14 months later you probably don't even miss the money. Glad it worked out.. I heard there is gonna be a John Wick 4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks great and sounds like it shoots great as well. It was worth the wait. When something works that well it is worth the price. 14 months later you probably don't even miss the money. Glad it worked out.. I heard there is gonna be a John Wick 4.
Yes, I think they just finished filming it, or are almost done.
 

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Yea, just the amount of time put into the texturing of the grip seems like it would have been a day.

Well, I would do it again, so I can't complain... Other than the fact it was listed at 20-25 weeks when I sent it in. And, it became 14 months :D
Some are done with a soldering iron and carving tool. The carving tool is used to cut a nice clean border and the soldering iron is used to stipple the frame within that border. But first the frame has to be prepared by sanding or grinding off the original texture to a smooth surface. Others are done with a computer controlled laser engraver. A laser engraver leaves a perfect pattern on the frame and can be programmed to produce any number of patterns. Hand stippling like yours leaves a random but consistent pattern. Unless you've got a good steady hand this is not something to be tried at home. If I was to try it I'd want to practice on a piece of plastic first. Then buy a grip module, maybe two for a Sig P320/P365 and practice on those before trying it on a serialized frame.

The slide is another matter. It's gotta' be stripped then machined. Its tool marks removed and then refinished. Then an action job, reassembly, test fired and cleaned before sending the gun back to you. I've done a lot of work on guns. Hell, I could write volumes about working on guns. On my stainless steel guns I figure I've got at least 16 to 20 hours or more on each one polishing them out to a mirror like finish along with the internals. It took me about 6 hours to bob the stainless steel hammer on my Beretta 92FS Compact. I had to keep working it until I got the perfect contour with the rear of the slide. I used a Dremel tool to cut of the spur, hand filed it to shape then finished it off with different grades of wet or dry. Of course I had to repeatedly disassemble then reassemble the gun several times until I got the curvature just right. I wanted both the back of the slide and hammer to look and feel like it was carved out of a single piece of stainless steel. You can rest assured that you sure got your money's worth.

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