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Wherever I go my Colt Detective Special goes with me. And I shoot it a lot. About how many rounds can you fire before you need to perform this deep cleaning taking the cylinder off as well? My revolver has fired at least a 4-5K before I do a complete teardown. Basic cleaning between shootings is all I do.


A suggestion: If (after removing the crane retaining screw on most revolvers) you can slide the crane and cylinder forward as a unit there is a risk scratching the side of the cylinder on the exposed edge of the frame window. I was taught once at S&W to hold the cylinder in place while sliding the crane forward by itself, which avoids the risk of scratching the cylinder.

Stainless steel should not be oiled. It should be cleaned and stored dry. The oil will just attract more deposits and dirt. Stainless should be cleaned and exposed to the air, and in the presence of oxygen, it will form it's own Chromium protective film. Stainless steel is made with nickel, iron and chromium, and as such it has it's own natural chromium film on it, therefore as long as there are no solvents, or acids on it, it will resist corrosion, even soaking it in water won't cause it to rust.

I remove the leading on my cylinders just for cosmetic reasons. But, really, if it doesn't bother you, don't feel it's a necessary part of the cleaning process. In fact, many people like the looks of burned powder and lead on the cylinder face. On blued guns no one worries about it. Double action revolver cylinder disassembly? Just dont do it!

Have agood cigar and regards
ARMARIN
 

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To answer the question in the subject line, ~1000 rounds is a nice round number, but probably too soon.
 

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no it doesn't

View attachment 7154

Wherever I go my Colt Detective Special goes with me. And I shoot it a lot. About how many rounds can you fire before you need to perform this deep cleaning taking the cylinder off as well? My revolver has fired at least a 4-5K before I do a complete teardown. Basic cleaning between shootings is all I do.


A suggestion: If (after removing the crane retaining screw on most revolvers) you can slide the crane and cylinder forward as a unit there is a risk scratching the side of the cylinder on the exposed edge of the frame window. I was taught once at S&W to hold the cylinder in place while sliding the crane forward by itself, which avoids the risk of scratching the cylinder.

Stainless steel should not be oiled. It should be cleaned and stored dry. The oil will just attract more deposits and dirt. Stainless should be cleaned and exposed to the air, and in the presence of oxygen, it will form it's own Chromium protective film. Stainless steel is made with nickel, iron and chromium, and as such it has it's own natural chromium film on it, therefore as long as there are no solvents, or acids on it, it will resist corrosion, even soaking it in water won't cause it to rust.

I remove the leading on my cylinders just for cosmetic reasons. But, really, if it doesn't bother you, don't feel it's a necessary part of the cleaning process. In fact, many people like the looks of burned powder and lead on the cylinder face. On blued guns no one worries about it. Double action revolver cylinder disassembly? Just dont do it!

Have agood cigar and regards
ARMARIN
ARMARIN,

I never remove any of my cylinders for cleaning regardless of how many rounds are fired.

Clerk
 

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There is really no reason to remove the cylinder for cleaning on a swing-out cylinder revolver unless somehow it has been immersed in sludge or sandy goo that might have penetrated to the internals.
 

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You are mistaken about never lubing stainless steel. I'd agree that you should never use excessive lube on any gun. Stainless steel can rust; it just takes longer. My ex wife kept a stainless steel revolver under her bed. When she spilled some water on the bed, she didn't realize some water got on the gun. A few weeks later her gun had rust spots on it.
There is another reason to lube a stainless steel gun - reducing friction in moving parts.
 

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Use Ballistol. Lite coat. Rule of thumb: If you can see your finger print--you have TOO much lube/oil.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I do occasion remove the cylinder for a deep cleaning but it is really over kill. I can get to each cylinder with my bore brush and normally just swing the cylinder out and scrub each one.
I will put the cylinder in my sonic cleaner when there is a big buildup on the cylinder face or when the cylinder is black from all the shooting.

Using MPro-7 as my cleaner I have found I don't have to take the gun apart, no need to ever get under the slide plate and with a few wipes the outside of the cylinder is clean.
 

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Yes. I shoot several S&W revolvers-bunches of rounds-with cast lead bullets. One removes cylinder to clean after each session at the range. Taking the cylinder out for cleaning is not brain surgery. No big ceremony. It's the way to keep the gun functioning in top condition. Wiping down with RIG works great on all the handguns. The idea is to clean the entire cylinder/crane assembly. The cylinder turns on something.
 

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They go into my sonic cleaner when they become excessively dirty. Does a great job. And then lube all internal parts with Ballistol MILK.
This gun was a mess. Here is a pick after sonic cleaning.

 

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I have never removed a cylinder for cleaning, but I never let my firearms get real dirty.
I clean all my firearms with Lucas Oil Products for firearms on the parts you don't see and I use Mothers Mag Polish on the parts you do.
The polish helps eliminate fingerprints while handling.

These were bought new in the 70"s

19654
 
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