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I hope that you won't mind a little bit of professional critique...

First of all, I compliment you on your patternmaking skills. Nicely done.

You made your pattern so that the top of the holster pouch abuts the grip of the pistol.
A better method would have been to cut the pouch's top edge a finger-width lower than where the pistol's trigger-guard abuts its grip. This would give you a better chance at achieving a firing grip before beginning your presentation, since you would have enough room to quickly wrap your fingers around the grip before pulling the pistol free.

You stated that you prefer to make your pocket holster a little loose.
As you show when you insert the pistol into the sewn holster, this looseness permits the pistol to drop even deeper into the holster, making achieving a firing grip all the more difficult.
Better would be to make the holster a little tight, keeping the pistol's grip a little higher above the pouch. A few practice draws would "slick-up" the leather, keeping the holster from "grabbing" the gun.

Instead of making the pouch and its backing "disguise" out of the same piece of leather, maybe make the pouch as a separate part, and sew it to a separate, rectangular "disguise" piece. You would sew the two parts together only at the bottom of the holster, letting the pouch separate from the backing as you slide your hand in to grab the gun.
You might also sew a piece of latex-impregnated carpet stabilizer to the outside of your holster, or to the outside of the "disguise" piece I described above. It really grabs onto the inside of your pocket.

The other kind of hand-stitcher, the so-called Speedy Stitcher, with its bobbin inside its handle, is a far superior device to the kind that you show (with its bobbin above its needle). It costs a little more, but it never breaks or bends: I've used the same one for almost 50 years now.
I haven't seen your hand-stitching video, so I don't know whether you know about this, but a separate "stab awl" with a diamond-cross-section needle, is a very useful tool to help you begin a hand-stitching job or, as a preliminary hole-maker, to get your stitching through very thick material.
I also keep a cake of beeswax handy, as "thread glue" mostly.
 

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Yeah, but Robert's sewing ladies use machines, not hand-sewing awls.

(At this point I am not certain, but I believe that Robert has made four separate holsters for Jean and me. Maybe it's five.)
 
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