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......... Found a 535 used on Ebay, 22 inch rifled slug barrel which goes back to my question about sawing it off myself. I have a hack saw .....
Do yourself a favor and protect your right to ownership. NO SAWED-OFFS.

If you want to purchase an SBR or Other, or have a reliable gunshop do a legal conversion.... pay the price and do the forms.

BUT you may be able to convert a shot barrel to a slug gun barrel by having proper sights added to a shortened barrel. Ask a gunsmith if this is possible IF you can find no other barrel option.

I suspect once you add up $$$s, it will be more cost effective to buy something more suitable.
 

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As long as the barrel is the legal (non NFA) length after cutting it you can do it yourself no harm / no foul as far as legality goes. But I would have it done professionally.
 

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As long as the barrel is the legal (non NFA) length after cutting it you can do it yourself no harm / no foul as far as legality goes. But I would have it done professionally.
Just make sure it's at least 1/4 inch more than the legal length which is 18 inches. This will allow for any screw ups or crooked cuts. The overall length of the shotgun can be no shorter than 24 inches. You can wrap several layers of masking tape around the barrel to use as a guide for the hacksaw blade, in order to achieve a square cut. Cut a little at a time making a shallow groove all the way around the barrel instead of trying to saw straight through. This will assure that you get a straight and even cut. The end of the barrel can be "dressed" by wrapping different grits of sandpaper or emory cloth wrapped tightly around a flat object such as a ruler and sanding or filling out the cut marks. Start with 220 to 600 grit or emory cloth. You might want to secure the barrel in a vise or by some other means. A flat file can also be used followed by sandpaper. The next step is to chamfer the inside of the barrel. Using a rounded "object" that is slightly larger than the barrel diameter such as a cut down broom handle if it's a 12 gauge. Place the sandpaper at the end of the "object" secure the sandpaper to that "object" and twist the "object" several times inside the gun barrel. Removing all the burrs. Again start with 220 to 600 grit. Then remove the sharp edges on the outside of the barrel by using the same grit sandpaper folded around a flat object and going around the barrel. I do not like to use files as they can remove too much metal at one time leaving flat spots on the end of the barrel. I also find that folding the sandpaper several times and holding it between your fingers while going around the barrel works best for this. The last step is to clean the barrel. If done carefully the barrel will not have to be re-blued unless you want the end to be blued in which case you can use a cold blue compound that is commercially available. A professional looking job can be done by just about anyone who is reasonably skilled with hand tools. It should take about an hour or so.
 

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GCBHM:
Missing the target is not the issue, it's what happens when the bullets pass thru the target at relatively close range, penetrate several walls and hit someone or something that was not intended.
agreed. With a shotgun, anything larger than buckshot is going to go through walls, maybe several walls. You'd be surprised how much penetration results from hitting a target with a 12ga deer slug. Way more than you need unless you've got guys standing 6 deep.
 

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agreed. With a shotgun, anything larger than buckshot is going to go through walls, maybe several walls. You'd be surprised how much penetration results from hitting a target with a 12ga deer slug. Way more than you need unless you've got guys standing 6 deep.
I once took a 12 gauge double barreled shotgun loaded with 000 buckshot. Fired both barrels at the same time through the hood of an abandoned car at about 6 feet away. It blew a hole through the hood so large that you could stick your freakin' head through it. I doubt that sheetrock would pose any obstacle. Generally speaking I do not keep a long gun for home defense either rifle or shotgun. I prefer a handgun. But nevertheless If I were to choose a shotgun it would have to be a 12 gauge loaded with #4 shot preferably 3' inch shells. At close range in the torso it would give an intruder one hell of a "tummy" ache. A face full of it even better. Forget about slugs in a home or apartment environment. Of course it all depends on what gauge shotgun an individual has. How 'bout a sawed off 10 gauge?
 

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Sorry if this is redundant....

In the early posts there was a list of shotguns, Mossberg was on there. That's my choice and the military uses them - double action bars. $500 will put you in good shape. Don't buy a duck gun, buy a defense gun. I don't like the AR style stock. Make it hold as much ammo as possible. I use milsurp combat ammo. Screw the penitration issue. If me or my family's life is on the line, I'll worry about the other 'maybe/might/worry/not for certain' stuff later'. Keep the barrel legally short - harder to grab. Get one with a penitrator jagged edge on the muzzle. All else fails, jab the shit out of them. Screw all the fancy sight stuff. Add a light. It's what's beside my bed.

Better choice: M4 5.56 is the least penitration round out there. In tests I've seen it upsets after the first piece of sheet rock and rarely makes past the next. Just like in combat. For that reason it has become the fav of home defense. Down side: Training and expense. If you expect your spouse to use it take that into consideration. That alone is good reason to reconsider the shotgun.

Handgun? Not as effective as you might think but better than a sharp stick to the eye.

Most effective tool of all: PRACTICE
'
 

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Just make sure it's at least 1/4 inch more than the legal length which is 18 inches. This will allow for any screw ups or crooked cuts. The overall length of the shotgun can be no shorter than 24 inches. You can wrap several layers of masking tape around the barrel to use as a guide for the hacksaw blade, in order to achieve a square cut. Cut a little at a time making a shallow groove all the way around the barrel instead of trying to saw straight through. This will assure that you get a straight and even cut. The end of the barrel can be "dressed" by wrapping different grits of sandpaper or emory cloth wrapped tightly around a flat object such as a ruler and sanding or filling out the cut marks. Start with 220 to 600 grit or emory cloth. You might want to secure the barrel in a vise or by some other means. A flat file can also be used followed by sandpaper. The next step is to chamfer the inside of the barrel. Using a rounded "object" that is slightly larger than the barrel diameter such as a cut down broom handle if it's a 12 gauge. Place the sandpaper at the end of the "object" secure the sandpaper to that "object" and twist the "object" several times inside the gun barrel. Removing all the burrs. Again start with 220 to 600 grit. Then remove the sharp edges on the outside of the barrel by using the same grit sandpaper folded around a flat object and going around the barrel. I do not like to use files as they can remove too much metal at one time leaving flat spots on the end of the barrel. I also find that folding the sandpaper several times and holding it between your fingers while going around the barrel works best for this. The last step is to clean the barrel. If done carefully the barrel will not have to be re-blued unless you want the end to be blued in which case you can use a cold blue compound that is commercially available. A professional looking job can be done by just about anyone who is reasonably skilled with hand tools. It should take about an hour or so.
For sure I will use a dowel down the barrel to accurately determine 18.5 inches, no less than that, and total length of atleast 24 inches, maybe 25. Now this might sound like a stupid question but which would do better, a smooth bore with a vent rib or a barrel designed for slugs with rifling and no rib? The rib would be an obstacle for a clean cut, but Im wondering if the rifling would hinder the 0 buckshot or #4 or whichever. Or would introducing a spin might cause the pattern to open up more in less distance?
 

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Well, here is mine:

It is an H&R 1871 (an 870 clone). I paid 200 dollars for it, and it functions great. It does kick like a mule though. It takes Remington 870 after-market parts, except for the barrel. I have ran about 100 rounds through it so far, from birdshot to buckshot, without a hitch. I usually keep it ready with 00 buck.
This is what I have,loaded with 00 buck,backed by a glock 30,.45.I'd like to also have an AK-47,but
I'm GTG as is. I second your remarks on the H&R-great price,function,and extremely well-built,but I don't think its recoil is especially pernicious.I have approximately 1364 rds through mine,
both buck and bird.I love it!
 

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Not to say its the best, just that it meets the average person's primary criteria:

I have always recommended slug guns for home defense: cost + application.
#2 or larger shot if you are inclined but with slugs as primary round. Rem 870s in 12 or 20 depending on shooter.

Perhaps the primary advantage of a handgun is you can hold a flashlight out with one hand instead of giving the perp a center of target to aim at.
 

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I have my Mossberg Cruiser in 20ga. Easy to carry through house and contrary to internet you can point this shotgun and not fly back into your face.

And here is the Poor mans special that I love. A Beretta MDL 1200 with synthetic stock semi auto. Has few operating parts, easy to clean and very light weight. I only use BUCKSHOT in both guns.
The Beretta 1200 is the field model of 1200 FP which was used by both military and Police. I had my gunsmith cut the barrel down to 20".

 

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I have a Benelli Super Black Eagle 12 gauge with a mag extension, sling, and a work light mounted on a rail on the mag tube.
For those unfamiliar with the SBE, it is not a gas operated semi-auto. It is inertia operated with a buffer spring in the stock. This makes it about as reliable as can be. It will cycle light trap loads as well as it does 3.5" goose loads.
I am currently shopping for a barrel that is considerably shorter, but they are hard to find a used one that won't break the bank.
 

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I have a Benelli Super Black Eagle 12 gauge with a mag extension, sling, and a work light mounted on a rail on the mag tube.
For those unfamiliar with the SBE, it is not a gas operated semi-auto. It is inertia operated with a buffer spring in the stock. This makes it about as reliable as can be. It will cycle light trap loads as well as it does 3.5" goose loads.
I am currently shopping for a barrel that is considerably shorter, but they are hard to find a used one that won't break the bank.
Your Benilli and my Beretta share a lot of similarities. And both have few parts and the inertial system is very reliable and so easy to clean. I can understand why you want a new barre as opposed to cutting the barrel. the Chokes. The gun smith told me if I wanted mine choked, it could do it later. I paid 80.00 t0 have the barrel cut and the Bead sight drilled. I placed a Fiber optic sight and a extened bolt release.
 

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Your Benilli and my Beretta share a lot of similarities. And both have few parts and the inertial system is very reliable and so easy to clean. I can understand why you want a new barre as opposed to cutting the barrel. the Chokes. The gun smith told me if I wanted mine choked, it could do it later. I paid 80.00 t0 have the barrel cut and the Bead sight drilled. I placed a Fiber optic sight and a extened bolt release.
Nope , not the reason. Lol, maybe
My educated observational guess is "GoldWing" trap shoots, hunts. Wants to keep the long barrel
Looking for a defensive size barrel when he's not sport shooting.
 

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I'm GOLDWINGs secretary today, I was just looking at his notes here on the desk.
Hope he doesn't get pissed off at me for posting.
 

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I'm GOLDWINGs secretary today, I was just looking at his notes here on the desk.
Hope he doesn't get pissed off at me for posting.
Not an issue, Pic. Your assessment was spot on. I have a full set of Benelli choke tubes for this old girl and intend to use them. My gun show friend is on the lookout for a crusty barrel that I can get at a reasonable price.
BTW, this SBE will move nine ounces of lead in the blink of an eye.
 
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I may not have cut mine down if it were drilled for chokes.
Agreed. I might not cut down an original barrel even W/O choke drilling. I like the idea of modifying stuff but still being able to return it to original. There is value in having an unmolested gun VS one that is customized.:)
 
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Mine is just a shotgun. No problem cutting the barrel down.I have plenty of shotguns. It serves a purpose now and is not some prize collection piece. No need to sit in a safe or closet. I like shooting it with the shorter barrel. And guns are made for shooting. A $100.00 investment turned out well.
 

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Mine is just a shotgun. No problem cutting the barrel down.I have plenty of shotguns. It serves a purpose now and is not some prize collection piece. No need to sit in a safe or closet. I like shooting it with the shorter barrel. And guns are made for shooting. A $100.00 investment turned out well.
I do not have several shotguns, and when for whatever reason I want to deal on an upgrade or trade on a gun, the other party in the transaction most often will pay less for an altered gun than one that is as it was built.
I am not trying to start an argument. Just saying how I roll.
 
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I only own two shotguns. An H&R SB12 single shot, great for birds, and a H&R Pardner Pump...both in 12 GA. I look at the Pardner as a "home defense" shotgun.

Nothing fancy, but it is reliable and really tough. I like to use #4 buck as a defensive load.
 
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