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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If a pistol could duplicate the sighting and steady platform of a rifle could it compete?

In shooter situation (where fast draw is not an issue), in a building, it may be that employees are armed with pistols. If the shooter has a rifle then he has the advantage. What if a handgun could be 'clipped' into a frame that essentially makes it a rifle?

Why a frame? Consider a school where you need a handgun kept close on your person. You want to protect it. That would be difficult with a rifle unless it's locked up. I doubt a teacher would sling his AR. But if you had a 'mount' just set in the corner, ready for use, do you think it would help? Are these things made?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
the question seems mostly answered, but…I‘m going to try to go point by point.

Adding a stock to a pistol does increase hit potential by gaining two more contact points with shoulder and cheek to help stabilize the firearm and maintain alignment. This also helps speed up follow up shots.

Hit potential is key in stopping someone from continuing to do bad things, however it isn’t the only factor. When looking at power of rifle rounds which generally push projectiles at velocities greater than 2,300 feet per second, the energy levels are higher than what pistol rounds produce. Most pistols push projectiles at less than 1,400 FPS. In the case of an AR15 the rounds are often traveling over 3,000 feet per second With energy levels near 1,500 ft/lbs, compared to a 9mm running 1,200 FPS and producing 370 ft/lbs. So, rifles produce larger wounds that stop biologic targets more quickly. Rifles also are better barrier penetrators and body armor defeaters.

Stocks for pistols have been produced. In the US the attachment of a stock to a handgun without having passed an additional background check while applying for a tax stamp from the ATF to turn a handgun into a short barreled rifle, is illegal. Owning and posessing both a handgun and a stock for that handgun without having the tax stamp is considered “constructive intent” by the ATF and is still considered illegal, even if the stock is never attached.

In other countries this may not be an issue.

The concept is not new. The Israelis make some products to basically place a chassis over a handgun and turn it into a pistol caliber carbine. They also made/make(?) a product called the Corner Shot, which was made for building entry teams. Basically a shoulder stock for a Glock that is hinged, with a camera so they can shoot from behind cover and look around corners and fire without exposing a soldier/police officer to fire.

The Mauser Broomhandle and early artillery model Luger pistols, as well as the Browning HiPower had models with provision for mounting shoulder stocks in the early 1900s. Even black powder Colt revolvers could be fitted with stocks. So, again, the concept isn’t new. But the handgun cartridges still never were intended to outperform the rifle cartridges.
Excellent answer. The one I was looking for. Thanks to all.
 
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