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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got the Beretta back from getting cerakote and it looks awesome…however now the takedown lever is so hard I have to use a nylon pushrod to get it down and when I got it home, I realized the hammer would not stay back leaving it in a constant state of DA. I’m not exactly happy getting back a gun that looks better, but functions like crap. It functioned flawless before and was one of my favs. He is supposed to fix the hammer and says it’s “simple”. We’ll see. As for the takedown lever, he claims the tolerances are so tight in Berettas, they just come out that way after cerakote, but will work it’s way into being easier the more I use it. Thoughts? So far, I’m pretty pissed. Thoughts, ideas??
 

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I hate to say it, but while Cerakote can improve a firearms looks, it like any coating adds dimensional size to parts creating fit issues. In most cases, if only relegated to non-fitting surfaces you may not run into problems. Coating internal parts will normally result in issues. The Beretta, and its open top Slide, creates issues with the Barrel and Locking Block being able to function freely in many cases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I hate to say it, but while Cerakote can improve a firearms looks, it like any coating adds dimensional size to parts creating fit issues. In most cases, if only relegated to non-fitting surfaces you may not run into problems. Coating internal parts will normally result in issues. The Beretta, and its open top Slide, creates issues with the Barrel and Locking Block being able to function freely in many cases.
I’m starting to wish I would have just kept the shitty scuffed finish and the flawless action rather than the new finish and the shitty action. I hope I didn’t ruin my gun!
 

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Steel parts can be re-blued, or phosphate coated which changes the surface of the parent metal so doesn't change dimensions. Aluminum parts, such as the frames, are hard anodized with a thin protective finish to help prevent wear, as aluminum itself is normally soft. Depending on the application of your Cerakote, in many cases, it can only be removed by abrasives. Sometimes plastic media can be used to remove painted finishes without harm to the base metal. Whether it would be effective with Cerakote, I'm not sure, but if push comes to shove, it could be an avenue for you to search for a solution.
 

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I'd give it time. Does the pistol cycle live rounds? Perhaps give it a breaking in period. The hammer not staying back is odd.
I would have to disagree... if the Hammer does not stay "cocked", when released, it could discharge the chambered round. That's why performing a function check, on any firearm, after work is performed, is necessary to prevent an accidental discharge, prior to the introduction of "Live Rounds".
 

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I would have to disagree... if the Hammer does not stay "cocked", when released, it could discharge the chambered round. That's why performing a function check, on any firearm, after work is performed, is necessary to prevent an accidental discharge, prior to the introduction of "Live Rounds".
Agree, that issue needs to be addressed first. Perhaps the cerakote is preventing the hammer from full rearward movement? I would assume the pistol still has its halfcock and unless the pistol has its trigger fully depressed while the hammer is to the rear the safety block should prevent the pistol from firing unless it's really boogered up.
 

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Agree, that issue need to be addressed first. Perhaps the cerakote is preventing the hammer from full rearward movement?
It's hard to say, by the same token, if it's coated on the sear engagement surface of the Hammer, then there would be no "ledge" for the Sear to "catch" and hold the Hammer, cocked. Although, it's possible it was assembled improperly too.
 

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Whenever you have a gun that functions flawlessly ... DO NOT fix it , refinish it , lend it to a friend or Sell It !

In a gunfight the other guy doesn't care how pretty your gun is ... you want a gun that works Flawlessly !

Only hits count and Flawless Operation beats looks good ...seven ways to Sunday !

I hope you get it fixed and I hope you can trust it because a Flawless Operating Gun is the best kind to have . I had a similar experience and have learned if it's working right and shooting tight ...leave it alone !

Gary
 

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I had these two guns cerakoted. When I got them back I had to remove the cerakote from all of the bearing/mating surfaces, holes in the frame and the slide rails on the 1911's frame and slide. I also removed the grip frame bushings then ran a tap through the holes in the frame to remove the cerakote from the threads.

On the S&W 642 I removed the cerakote on the side plate along with its mating surface inside the frame. For obvious reasons you can't cerakote the frame with the side plate on. Before I had the 642 done I removed the barrel and had to remove the cerakote where the barrel meets the frame so it wouldn't crack when I screwed it back on. I also removed the cerakote on the crane where it fits into the cylinder and frame. On the 642 they plugged the screw holes in the frame before cerakoting it.

I used 400 to 600 grit wet or dry sandpaper wrapped around a small flat machinist's ruler to remove the cerakote from the frame and slide rails on the 1911. Along with a small piece of wet or dry wrapped around a proper sized punch to remove the cerakote from the holes in the frame. I was made fully aware of this before I sent the bare frames and bare slide out. Of course I could have paid them extra for the time it takes for them to do this work. They probably should have explained this to you before doing the job?

Trigger Wood Gun barrel Air gun Rectangle


Revolver Automotive lighting Wood Trigger Shotgun
 

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Whenever you have a gun that functions flawlessly ... DO NOT fix it , refinish it , lend it to a friend or Sell It !

In a gunfight the other guy doesn't care how pretty your gun is ... you want a gun that works Flawlessly !

Only hits count and Flawless Operation beats looks good ...seven ways to Sunday !

I hope you get it fixed and I hope you can trust it because a Flawless Operating Gun is the best kind to have . I had a similar experience and have learned if it's working right and shooting tight ...leave it alone !

Gary
There's nothing wrong with refinishing a gun. Providing that it's done properly. The problem with cerakote is the thickness of the finish and the fact that the cerakote has to be removed from all of the bearing/mating surfaces on the gun. Some parts can be easily masked off others it's more practical to remove the cerkote after it's been applied. A lot of times it's only a matter of removing it where there's a slight overspray. Cerakote if done properly is an extremely durable finish.

Myself I like to take care of my things. I want my guns to both look good and function flawlessly. I paid good money for them and don't want them to look like something that was banged around in a tool or tackle box. What I've found is if a lot of people don't care what the outside looks like (the part that you can see) chances are they don't really care about what the inside looks like (the part where you can't see).
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I would assume he has a FFL, if he's doing this for any compensation. It's a slippery slope, that can be treacherous, and in this case, bordering on a liability issue.
I don’t know that either. He is a friend of a friend who works in the same field as me, has a small business and came recommended. I would assume he has the normal stuff like an LLC, insurance and stuff…but I really didn’t look into him beyond reviews, and word of mouth.
 
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