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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey guys,I am in the process of breaking in a new G33,I fired 100 rnds through it on the first shooting session w/no issues,I just fired 150 more rounds through it today and had 2 failures to feed on the first 2 mags.I summed it up to I was limp wristing it because I was using a bench rest I was not familiar with. I changed to a sandbag rest and shot groups that I was totally happy with,but,after breaking the pistol down,I noticed copper remnants almost forming on the feed ramp of the barrel,any feedback would be helpfull,thanks as always for responses
 

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Copper-jacketed and copper-washed bullets leave a slight deposit, as they rub against the pistol's feed ramp on the way into the chamber.
Eventually, this deposit builds up until it's visible. If it builds up enough, it can even be felt by your fingertip.

Use a G.I., M16 "tooth"-brush and some solvent to remove it. It may even come off when rubbed with a solvent-daubed patch.


By the way, FTF means "failure to fire." According to what you wrote, you didn't have one of those.
When you limp-wristed the gun, you experienced a feeding problem, a failure to eject, or maybe even a jam. But there was no FTF.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
as always SteveM1911A1 thanks for your input. I was thinking solvent and a scotchbrite pad. Also thanks on the ACRONYM correction.
 

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Agree with Steve. With Glocks, the most common problem is limp-wristing although some ammo will give you more problems than others. Always use quality ammo regardless of your gun, but with Glocks, always use a firm grip, lock your wrist and you should be fine. Good luck!
 

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Scotchbrite is a good choice. It can be found in several different "grits."
Just be careful not to remove the finish from other areas in the process.

(Maybe cut a small piece of Scotchbrite, to fit the specific area, and propel it with a small stick.)
 

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hey guys,I am in the process of breaking in a new G33,I fired 100 rnds through it on the first shooting session w/no issues,I just fired 150 more rounds through it today and had 2 failures to feed on the first 2 mags.I summed it up to I was limp wristing it because I was using a bench rest I was not familiar with. I changed to a sandbag rest and shot groups that I was totally happy with,but,after breaking the pistol down,I noticed copper remnants almost forming on the feed ramp of the barrel,any feedback would be helpfull,thanks as always for responses
I think you may have diagnosed the problem correctly. I've seen this before, and done it myself a time or two, mainly because you don't need to hold the pistol firmly to hold it steady in a rested shooting position, so it's easier to get too relaxed. Just to make sure it's not magazine-related, I'd recommend marking/numbering your mags so you can tell them apart (assuming you haven't already done so). That way, if you have similar (feeding) problems over and over again with the same mag, you can replace it to fix the problem. It's also possible that it is ammo-related, especially if you are using range reloads or less-expensive target/range ammo.

Give the pistol a good cleaning and lube, and you'll probably be good to go. That's why you are testing/breaking it in anyway, right? To catch any problems now, under controlled conditions, so they can be diagnosed and eliminated. Mission accomplished on finding a potential problem, now just narrow it down to the most likely cause and work (test) to eliminate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks DJ Niner,yes my thinking was the same,I put 250 rounds through the gun,now it's time to break it down and clean it and figure out what kind of defense rounds to use
 
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