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Hey, I am looking to eventually get a CCW, but at ths point in time, I would like to explore my options and perhaps get a few pointers to lead me to finding the best pistol for me.... I want a pistol that really packs a punch, but doesnt cost $1 per shell. Any advice would be appreciated... Thanks PS... NO BS please
 

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Hey, I am looking to eventually get a CCW, but at ths point in time, I would like to explore my options and perhaps get a few pointers to lead me to finding the best pistol for me.... I want a pistol that really packs a punch, but doesnt cost $1 per shell. Any advice would be appreciated... Thanks PS... NO BS please
wow.... lots of factors to consider.... first being practice time.... are you going to practice enough to be able to manipulate a auto under stress.... if not, stick to revolvers.

if you are going to spend the time to know your gun inside and out, then the world of autos opens up to you.

if you are looking for a ccw gun, alot depends on your physical stature as to what you can conceal AND what you can comfortably carry .

next are you going to want to disassemble your gun for cleaning.... if you arent comfortable with that.... stick to a revolver..... if you dont mind an easy field strip.... autos can fit the bill.

find a range in your area.... rent a couple of calibers and types..... have some fun..... maybe pick the brains of other shooters there.... even joining a local gun club can expose you too many HANDS ON types of guns.

once you make a few choices , your next choices will help you dial in whats perfect for you.
 

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He covered most of what you need except find a good basic hand gun course to take and start there then start renting different handguns
 

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Find a good teacher and take his advice. Usually a 9mm pistol, or .38 revolver is a decent starting place for a beginner. Don't try to get something too small, because subcompacts are about twice as hard to learn to shoot accurately, and sometimes even a gentle chambering like the 9mm will feel like a heavy kicker to a new shooter.

If you get all of your training ducks in a row, I think any competent instructor would approve of something like a Glock 19, XD-9, Ruger SR-9, S&W M&P, or a S&W or Ruger revolver with at least a 3" barrel. Some folks like Beretta and their Stoeger clones, and I don't hear any bad things about them. Figure on spending $450-600 dollars for a gun with a good reputation, and figure on shooting several hundred rounds, just to gain a little confidence and burn the safety rules into your brain, and several hundred more to achieve any kind of real accuracy.
 

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I hope this isn't too "wordy" for a new member, but my two cents.....


This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper training, and fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.

There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil... just sayin....

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....

PS... by the way jimbo, I'm two hours south of the Indiana/Michigan line. If you can make it down here, I'll be happy to provide range time with a variety of handguns.
 

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Everyone here has given good advice only thing left that I can suggest is; don't know what Mich. requires for CCW permits but, even if they do not require safety course or handling and proficency you should voluntarily opt for same as it just makes good sense. Good luck and welcome to the board.
 

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I would contradict USMCJ on one point; never buy a handgun for how it feels in your hand. This is doubly true if you're new--you don't know how to hold the darned thing yet, so what do you know about how it's supposed to feel? Trust me, after a while you'll find the way it feels to be 'right' no matter what it is.

The controls must be reachable without shifting the gun in your hand. It must be simple to care for and reliable. It must be accurate enough to make shooting fun, yet this is not our prime concern.

Like the others I would recommend a 9mm to start wit. All service caliber guns have pretty muc the same wounding characteristics, so a 9mm is a .40 is a .45 in terms of terminal effect. A hit in the forearm won't make him stop, a hit in the forehead may. (And a hit in the foreskin certainly will...heh heh heh) So, go with a 9mm for now.

I eshew revolvers. 6 rounds is how a guy with a GLOCK says "hello", it'snot his entire compliment of ammo. And far from being easier to shoot and care for, they are snarky lil demons when they want to be. I'd go with a GLOCK 17 or 19, or an HK USP or P30.
 

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Hey, I am looking to eventually get a CCW, but at ths point in time, I would like to explore my options and perhaps get a few pointers to lead me to finding the best pistol for me.... I want a pistol that really packs a punch, but doesnt cost $1 per shell. Any advice would be appreciated... Thanks PS... NO BS please
Well, then my advice would be to purchase a quality revolver in .357, then that way you could also shoot .38's thru it for practice. The revolver might not hold more than 6 rounds, but seriously, most of us would never need any more than that if we were having a close encounter of the worst kind. Besides, you could carry a reload in a speed loader if you felt you needed it. JMHO.
 

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I would contradict USMCJ on one point; never buy a handgun for how it feels in your hand. This is doubly true if you're new--you don't know how to hold the darned thing yet, so what do you know about how it's supposed to feel? Trust me, after a while you'll find the way it feels to be 'right' no matter what it is.
You're entitled to your own opinion, but you're way off base. You're gonna tell me how a given gun feels in my hand? In many years of teaching firearms, I've seen lots of guns returned/traded in ONLY because they didn't "feel right". You can wear an uncomfortable pair of shoes long enough to tolerate 'em, but new shooters will shoot better, faster, if the gun is comfortable to hold in the first place.

Start a new shooter with a .22.... period. Many 9mm handguns have recoil snappier than a .45 ACP... you certainly wouldn't advocate starting out with a .45 ..... would you?
 

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NO matter what anyone tells you, you will probably buy a number of handguns before you settle on the one you will carry. I like my SW 380 bodyguard semi auto bc it is easy to conceal and light enough to not pull my pants down. It does not have the most power but with hollow points it will pack a punch at close range and most issues will take place within a 21 foot range of you. It ain't for long range shooting. I also have a SW j frame 380+p revolver and a springfield xd 40 subcompact automatic which a like to shoot. My wife and I are ccw in two states and we shoot hundreds of rounds out of each when out West every year. My wife also likes to shoot a single shot 22 rifle that belonged to her brother. I have a Marlin 450 lever action that kicks like a mule. Very expensive to shoot so don't shoot often although I bought a scope for it and will shoot it when back out West. Good luck on your search but don't get crazy about picking the exact gun. I ain't going to happen if you like guns you will buy more than one.
 

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Don't get in a hurry and hang out here and read a bunch before you decide. I've spent months deciding before I buy a new gun and I've been shooting 36+ years.
 

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You're missing my point USMCJ--I'm not trying to tell him how a gun should feel, I'm saying to disregard how it feels and with training and time he'll get used to it. So long as he can reach all of the controls without shifting his grip, it's good to go. Yeah,I've seen a lot of pistols come back for the same reason--I roll my eyes when I hear it. What are ya, some kind of martial arts/jedi master gun guru whose karma is thrown off by a gun with a bump where it swhould be smooth? <g>
 

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You're missing my point USMCJ--I'm not trying to tell him how a gun should feel, I'm saying to disregard how it feels and with training and time he'll get used to it. So long as he can reach all of the controls without shifting his grip, it's good to go. Yeah,I've seen a lot of pistols come back for the same reason--I roll my eyes when I hear it. <g>
Well, as politely as I can say it, I think you're misleading a lot of new shooters. By the way... IF a new gun buyer would have bought a gun that was comfortable in the first place, you likely wouldn't have
seen a lot of pistols come back for the same reason--I roll my eyes when I hear it.
would you? You don't have to agree with me, and I most certainly will never agree with you on this subject. Disregard how it feels? Wow. That's just .... well, wrong.
 

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No, brother Marine, I know from where I speak. You're talking to a guy who went from an HK to a GLOCK, forcibly. I had to. Did it "feel" wrong? Yes it did. Do I now shoot the GLOCK far better than I ever shot the HK? Yes I do. Yet given the option in the first 2-3 weeks I'd never have done it. "Feel" is irrelevent, performance is what matters.
 

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No, brother Marine, I know from where I speak. You're talking to a guy who went from an HK to a GLOCK, forcibly. I had to. Did it "feel" wrong? Yes it did. Do I now shoot the GLOCK far better than I ever shot the HK? Yes I do. Yet given the option in the first 2-3 weeks I'd never have done it. "Feel" is irrelevent, performance is what matters.
I respectfully disagree. Feel matters. You were forced to comply because it was a condition of your employment. Like many things in life, if most people don't like something, they will avoid it. Bad, if they are avoiding their SD gun. If people enjoy shooting their SD gun they are more likely to be proficient with it.
 
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