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Discussion Starter #1
I bought the solution from Midway USA. (under $7 less s/h for either the zinc or manganese phosphate solution) and found it not very difficult to do.
Now let me say this isn't intended as instruction (it's just how I did it): especially since I experimented by just heating some of the solution mixed with water in a large glass by microwave. (Use something microwave safe.) The instructions actually want you to heat (and maintain) it to a certain temprature. You are also supposed to put some coarse steel wool (degrease it first) into the solution and cook it for 30 minutes. The solution does contain phosphoric acid, so it would be best follow the product instructions and be careful.
I used these sites for info:
http://www.blindhogg.com/parkerizing.html
http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/edu52.htm
Surface prep is an important thing. I sand blasted, washed, and wiped with acetone. I don't see any reason chemical stripping followed by cleaning/degreasing shouldn't work.
There are fumes; so do it in a well ventilated area.
I don't like using their sealer (found it isn't needed) and had better results with motor oil.
I think it worked out pretty well.




One thing, the hardened area of the slide (where it locks up) parkerizes a slightly lghter color than the rest of the slide:


I also did a 1911 in it following the directions more closely. I left the slide in longer than the rest of the pistol so it came out darker:
http://gbrannon.bizhat.com/DSCN4177.jpg

After close to half a year's use (it gets a lot of carry), the parkerizing seems to be holding up pretty well. There is a little wear around the front of the slide and the ejection port, but that's about it.


Regards,
Greg
 

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That looks pretty neat. Good job. How would you do a 20" barrel? Any ideas? I've got an old shotgun I'm gonna' make into a house gun and it needs a refinish job. :smt033
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!
In regards to your shotgun barrel; here are some sites that may help:

http://projectguns.com/parkerizing2.html - suggest using two shackling pans for long parts

http://www.freewebs.com/socal_webshooters/diy_home_parkerizing.htm - has an economical set up for heating a long tank

http://www.calvan.com/html/parkerizing_tanks.html - parkerizing tanks

Parkerizing solutions work best in the 180-185 degrees F range. They work outside that range but may take longer (cooler) or shorten the working life of the solution (hotter).

The tank needs to be stainless steel or ceramic (porcelain works as well). Non-stainless, iron, and aluminum are not recommended for use. You could also use plastic or pvc with some type immersion heater (stainless or ceramic element). Personally, I would be tempted to cap a suitable length of pvc and wrap it in some insulation material. Prepare enough solution in a suitable pot then transfer it to the pvc. I imagine it would hold it at temperature long enough to do the job. You could probably use a heat gun (or hairdryer to help maintain the temp.

Regards,
Greg
 

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Thanks for the info. Looks very interesting. Have you done any spray on/bake on type finishes? I wonder how they wear compared to the parkerized.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I tried Gun Kote and Wheeler Cerama Coat on this slide. They both showed wear pretty quickly at the corner of the ejection port where brass would hit. They both were fine on the flats. The Cerama Coat was better on edges and corners. The pakerizing has done better than either.
In all fairness people say the Gun Kote works best over parkerizing and the Wheelers worked out great on a SIG 229 frame I did.
Here's what they looked like before use:
Gun Kote

Cerama Coat

Here is a photo where you can see the wear by the ejection port.


Here's the 229 with the Cerama Coat frame.


Regards,
Greg
 
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