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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This really pisses me off. I bought 60 rounds of Winchester 115gr Silvertip JHP and they're all like this (depicted right, left is a regular Sig V-Crown to compare). It appears that the end of the brass casing is choking on the bullet so hard that it's indenting the bullet and caving in. Compare this to the V-Crown or any other 9mm cartridge which are just nice and straight. I believe this is called overcrimping. I also bought some Winchester White Box 115gr Jacketed Hollow Points and 115gr FMJ and I got the same look on some of them. Some of them aren't choked at all while many of them are.

I'd like to know if this is something I should worry about. Sure, it's ugly as hell but I shot the fmj and it seemed fine. I also contacted Winchester and they said it's normal but it isn't normal because I've bought silvertips before and they weren't like this.
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Just a guess but the bullet may have a cannelure and the case is intentionally crimped to avoid bullet set back? That's a good thing. They may have had issues with that in the past? If you've already contacted the manufacturer and they told you that it's normal then I wouldn't worry about it. The manufacturer certainly does not want to have any civil liability issues with their ammo. Since you've already fired similarly crimped FMJ's without any issues it probably is normal. I doubt very much that the crimping operation will actually squeeze and indent the bullet which leads me to believe that they are now using a cannelure on their bullets where they didn't one before.

For what it's worth it's always a good idea to check your ammo for signs of bullet set back. Especially if for any reason you're chambering the same rounds more than once. For bullets that have a cannelure it's pretty easy to check. Too much bullet set back could raise chamber pressures to dangerous levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Just a guess but the bullet may have a cannelure and the case is intentionally crimped to avoid bullet set back? That's a good thing. They may have had issues with that in the past? If you've already contacted the manufacturer and they told you that it's normal then I wouldn't worry about it. The manufacturer certainly does not want to have any civil liability issues with their ammo. Since you've already fired similarly crimped FMJ's without any issues it probably is normal. I doubt very much that the crimping operation will actually squeeze and indent the bullet which leads me to believe that they are now using a cannelure on their bullets where they didn't one before.

For what it's worth it's always a good idea to check your ammo for signs of bullet set back. Especially if for any reason you're chambering the same rounds more than once. For bullets that have a cannelure it's pretty easy to check. Too much bullet set back could raise chamber pressures to dangerous levels.
It isn't cannelure. Many of the cartridges appear almost normal. Many are tightly seated like the picture shows.
Silvertips are not cannelured.
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