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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live on several acres bordering forest land. I've never been a hunter, and have limited experience with hand guns at a shooting range a few years back. I'm looking for any suggestions on one versitile gun that would be best for home protection from threats ranging from criminal trespass to protecting kids from bear and cougar if needed, and the occassional raiding coyote. While I know a couple guns might be best, my budget says I should probably stick with one for now. Needing to go through training, etc., is a given. Thanks for any feedback!
 

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The only single type of gun that is suitable for defense against both bears and humans, is probably a 12 gauge shotgun, because of the variety of ammo that can be fired through it.

Personally, I would want a pistol, a rifle, and a shotgun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. That makes sense. I'll start with a shotgun, then purchase the others later as the budget allows. I didn't know that a 12 gauge was able to use a variety of ammo, so I obviously need some education along with the firearm.
 

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Thanks. That makes sense. I'll start with a shotgun, then purchase the others later as the budget allows. I didn't know that a 12 gauge was able to use a variety of ammo, so I obviously need some education along with the firearm.
I too live out in the country in a bear and lion area. Bears are usually "just a bother" and gathered up by Game & Fish and "dropped elsewhere".
Lion attacks happen. But, rarely. Hungry young males without established territory, or rabid.
So, for me, pump 12 gauge shotgun at home, Ruger Alaskan .454 Casull revolver for mountain wilderness hiking. But, .44 Magnum is enough.

I think a general shotgun ammo concensus "might" be 2 3/4 inch shells with 00 buckshot for human varmints.
Or any animal up to and including black bears or lions. The brown bears (Kodiak/grizzlies) are an entirely different "deal".
They make rifled slugs for these. Solid, not the saboted (plastic encased) small diameter ones for deer.

My "night gun" is a Mossberg 500 "defensive model" pump. 20 " straight cylinder barrel (no choke). Holds 7 rounds plus one in the chamber.
I prefer the Mossberg because the safety is an intuitive push-pull "switch" at the back of the receiver, on top.
The "other recommended" Rem. & Win. pumps have a "cross-pin" safety mounted by the trigger guard. Not as easy in a SHTF event.
The Mossbergs are good quality for lowest cost other than "foreign-made". Mine was $250. Probably now $300 ? Not pretty, but a working tool.

Regardless of the barrel length or "choke", shotguns are NOT "scatterguns" like uninformed (including a few gun nuts) would like you to believe.
They need to be properly aimed in order to hit something, whether inside your house or outside. Especially with buckshot or slug loads.
Bird hunting loads use much smaller pellets (and a lot of them). You still need to "point" well. These are lethal to people or small animals close-in.

Whatever shotgun you might get, buy "target practice" birdshot loads. They come in a box of 25 and are amazing cheap.
And buy a couple of boxes expensive buckshot or slug loads for "defense". Practice the birdshot shells on some nice cardboard boxes.
Start at five yards, move out at five yard intervals. You will see what I mean about needing to aim.
Then try one box of the expensive ones to see how they do from the same start at five yards, and move out.

Load the other box, chamber one, safety on. Figure out how to train and protect your kids from any "gun accident".
You now have something to grab and use if needed. With confidence. Good Luck ! :smt1099

Obviously, I haven't covered how to deal with any real "worst case scenerios" with animal attacks on others in your family.
That is way advanced beyond Shotgun 101. But, the basic rule is "do anything you have to do to save them" and all can survive.
 
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