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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is everyone's thought on modding a carry gun?

I am awaiting the arrival of a Glock 29 10mm and already have a list of want to do mods as listed below:

Barrel- mainly for a fully supported barrel to shoot my hot handloads.

Sights- simply because the factory sights are junk and I want fiber optics to aid my old eyes.

Trigger- the trigger on Glocks leave a lot to be desired. Not looking to go below 3# pull bit would like a solid wall and nice, crisp break.

Any thoughts on the pros & cons of modding that which you will carry regularly?
 

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First, you aren't "modding" it. You are putting aftermarket made for parts in.
Second, take the new gun to the range with a hand full of targets, magazines and a case of ammo. Shoot it, have fun give it a workout. At the end, the trigger will be smoothed and as right as it will ever be, and the loose nut pulling it will be broken in. At this point, you know what you need or want, and know how the pistol preforms. Everything you listed is a "want" and pretty incorrect information driving the opinion.
A lot of people "Mod" their new Glock and then come to places like this to whine about how crappy Glocks are. E-V-E-R-Y S-I-N-G-L-E time, the first and best solution is return it to stock, or better yet, have someone who is familiar to do it. Not sure what you are used to or really think, but as an example, a Glock will never have a trigger pull resembling a 1911, or most anything else out there.
Before we go any farther, your liking this has no effect on it's being correct.
Happy shooting, and Good Luck.
 

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I do it just because I love to work on guns. Which stands to reason as I've been working on both them and cars for my entire life. If it's got reciprocating parts I'm all in. Some things I do for aesthetics some for function, mostly a combination of the two. I just finished my CZ 97 B. I changed the sights and upgraded it with a Cajun Gun Works race hammer kit, adjustable sear and short reset trigger system. In addition to polishing the slide rails, trigger bar and internal parts. The entire gun feels like it's on roller bearings just like my Shadow 2. CZ's are not the easiest guns to work on. You really have to know these guns inside and out especially the de-cocker versions. There are a few tiny little springs and parts that can easily go flying off into never never land if you're not careful. The sear cage assembly on the de-cockers is a real pain in the ass to reassemble and is not for the faint at heart. But after you've done it you come up with methods to make it easier.

I can't stand the feel of polymer triggers. Even though there's nothing inherently wrong with them. I don't know at least to me they make the gun feel like a cheap plastic toy? There are plenty of aftermarket trigger's and parts available for Glocks. Ghost https://ghostinc.com/glock-connectors/ makes a variety of different connectors for them. Some are drop in and some have to be fitted to adjust for over travel. Glocks are about the easiest of all guns to work on as there's not much to them. Sure you can just leave them the hell alone and they'll work right outta' the box but what fun is that? One of the best modifications you can make on a Glock is a push button slide cover plate. This makes the removal of the striker assembly a one hand operation. You also avoid chewing up the plastic striker sleeve. I always remove that assembly as part of my routine cleaning operation. I also added extended take down levers.

Myself, I have to know how to completely disassemble and reassemble every gun that I own. I can't stand having to rely on other people for things that I can do myself. Not only that but it's rewarding when you can take something that's pretty good as is and make it into something great. With the knowledge that you did it yourself. The only two guns that I own that I didn't do anything to other than a complete disassemble and reassemble are my Wilson EDC X9 and CZ Shadow 2. Obviously that's why they cost more. You're paying for some of that extra labor that you can do yourself.

Most guns that come out of the factory have machining, tooling marks and burrs. Which make the guns feel gritty and create excess friction. Sure you can go out and put a few thousand rounds through them before they smooth themselves out. But you can also spend a few hours working on them polishing out the roughness before even running a single box of ammo out of them. A friction free gun is a happy gun. The less effort it takes to make the gun go bang the more accurate and happy you'll be with it. Right from the get go.

Obviously if you're not mechanically inclined or are intimidated by all of those moving parts and how they go together and interact with each other than working on guns is not for everyone. Nor is it recommended. Depending on how many guns you have you may need a few specific tools for each individual one.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First, you aren't "modding" it. You are putting aftermarket made for parts in.
Second, take the new gun to the range with a hand full of targets, magazines and a case of ammo. Shoot it, have fun give it a workout. At the end, the trigger will be smoothed and as right as it will ever be, and the loose nut pulling it will be broken in. At this point, you know what you need or want, and know how the pistol preforms. Everything you listed is a "want" and pretty incorrect information driving the opinion.
A lot of people "Mod" their new Glock and then come to places like this to whine about how crappy Glocks are. E-V-E-R-Y S-I-N-G-L-E time, the first and best solution is return it to stock, or better yet, have someone who is familiar to do it. Not sure what you are used to or really think, but as an example, a Glock will never have a trigger pull resembling a 1911, or most anything else out there.
Before we go any farther, your liking this has no effect on it's being correct.
Happy shooting, and Good Luck.
I won't be on here whining about anything I do. Thanks to people like you, forums like this get little to no traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I do it just because I love to work on guns. Which stands to reason as I've been working on both them and cars for my entire life. If it's got reciprocating parts I'm all in. Some things I do for aesthetics some for function, mostly a combination of the two. I just finished my CZ 97 B. I changed the sights and upgraded it with a Cajun Gun Works race hammer kit, adjustable sear and short reset trigger system. In addition to polishing the slide rails, trigger bar and internal parts. The entire gun feels like it's on roller bearings just like my Shadow 2. CZ's are not the easiest guns to work on. You really have to know these guns inside and out especially the de-cocker versions. There are a few tiny little springs and parts that can easily go flying off into never never land if you're not careful. The sear cage assembly on the de-cockers is a real pain in the ass to reassemble and is not for the faint at heart. But after you've done it you come up with methods to make it easier.

I can't stand the feel of polymer triggers. Even though there's nothing inherently wrong with them. I don't know at least to me they make the gun feel like a cheap plastic toy? There are plenty of aftermarket trigger's and parts available for Glocks. Ghost https://ghostinc.com/glock-connectors/ makes a variety of different connectors for them. Some are drop in and some have to be fitted to adjust for over travel. Glocks are about the easiest of all guns to work on as there's not much to them. Sure you can just leave them the hell alone and they'll work right outta' the box but what fun is that? One of the best modifications you can make on a Glock is a push button slide cover plate. This makes the removal of the striker assembly a one hand operation. You also avoid chewing up the plastic striker sleeve. I always remove that assembly as part of my routine cleaning operation. I also added extended take down levers.

Myself, I have to know how to completely disassemble and reassemble every gun that I own. I can't stand having to rely on other people for things that I can do myself. Not only that but it's rewarding when you can take something that's pretty good as is and make it into something great. With the knowledge that you did it yourself. The only two guns that I own that I didn't do anything to other than a complete disassemble and reassemble are my Wilson EDC X9 and CZ Shadow 2. Obviously that's why they cost more. You're paying for some of that extra labor that you can do yourself.

Most guns that come out of the factory have machining, tooling marks and burrs. Which make the guns feel gritty and create excess friction. Sure you can go out and put a few thousand rounds through them before they smooth themselves out. But you can also spend a few hours working on them polishing out the roughness before even running a single box of ammo out of them. A friction free gun is a happy gun. The less effort it takes to make the gun go bang the more accurate and happy you'll be with it. Right from the get go.

Obviously if you're not mechanically inclined or are intimidated by all of those moving parts and how they go together and interact with each other than working on guns is not for everyone. Nor is it recommended. Depending on how many guns you have you may need a few specific tools for each individual one.

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You Sir are a kindred spirit. I do not own a "stock" gun and do all the work myself. Being a Machinist by trade, I tend to enjoy deburring and polishing things left ugly by the factory.

I already have a Johnny Glock trigger on order and chose his "Combat Trigger" since this will be a carry weapon. Once I have the factory trigger removed, I will spit shine it to see what I can get out of it.

Thank you, Sir, for your well written, thought out and informative post!
 

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You Sir are a kindred spirit. I do not own a "stock" gun and do all the work myself. Being a Machinist by trade, I tend to enjoy deburring and polishing things left ugly by the factory.

I already have a Johnny Glock trigger on order and chose his "Combat Trigger" since this will be a carry weapon. Once I have the factory trigger removed, I will spit shine it to see what I can get out of it.

Thank you, Sir, for your well written, thought out and informative post!
Thank You, and you're always welcome.

A machinist by trade? Awesome! I would have loved to have gotten into that line of work, it fascinates me. Restoring cars as a hobby not as a trade has kept me busy. I've done all that work myself, mechanical, body, paint, and electrical work. I've rebuilt engines, transmissions and suspensions, anything that moves and then some. Machine shop work I'd have to farm out.

Except for the engine and drivetrain one of my friends is building an entire car from scratch. For the body he first makes a wooden buck then shapes the sheet metal to fit. He made the chassis and body skeleton all from scratch. I don't think that there's anything that he could not make? If he had a foundry he could probably make his own engine and drive train.

Working on guns is kinda' like customizing cars only on a much smaller scale. I can easily spend 8 to 16 hours on any particular gun depending on what I want to do. Polishing out those tiny little parts is delicate work that you don't want to rush. Especially when it comes to parts that have to be fitted.


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I won't be on here whining about anything I do. Thanks to people like you, forums like this get little to no traffic.
Yeah, me either. Probably because we know what we are doing, are capable of doing it but most important we enjoy doing it. That really is the bottom line.

When I consider all of the time and money I spent restoring cars I'll never get my money back. Especially when you consider that time is money if you had to pay someone. Our labor has got to be worth something? It's the same with guns. If you were to add up the hours spent polishing out all of those parts and components and the cost of aftermarket parts we'll never get that back if we decided to sell. On average a gunsmith charges about $75 an hour. If you spend 10 hours on a $600 gun you'd have to add $750 to the cost of that gun just to break even. Not too many people would be willing to pay that.

But it's not about that at all. It's all about personal satisfaction, you really can't put a price on that. We're doing it for ourselves because we love what we are doing. A few years ago I made this 1/200 scale model of what else? The battleship Arizona. It's a plastic model kit with well over 1000 pieces. I paid extra for the brass etched detailing kit and railings along with real wood veneer decking. All of the railings, ladders and stairs were stamped into a thin flat sheet of brass which had to be removed, then cut, bent and folded into shape. If I was to add up all of my time, this thing took me months to complete. I estimate that I've got at least 200 hours into it. At $75 an hour that comes to $15,000. Sometimes I'd spend hours just working on it, other times a few hours here and there. But every hour I spent working on it and every time I look at it I can't help but think of what happened on that fateful day of infamy December 7th 1941. It's now one of my prized possessions.

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I have done some modifications to guns before, but not usually to a carry gun... Other than sights. The one exception is to the Beretta 92. I have installed a factory "D" spring to take 3lbs off the DA pull. But, it is still a factory part, and some factory 92 variants come with the spring already installed.

Other than that, I only keep guns that are modified as range toys, personally.
 

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I might be an outsider on this one.

My G19 sports a Ghost Evo Elite Trigger hand fitted by me. There is a C/T Laser Grip and an Olight PL-Mini work light.
It rides in a Outlaws brand custom light bearing Kydex holster on a Craft gun belt.
It shoots very well and has not once had a reliability problem of any sort with any ammo.
The stock parts are in safe keeping in case I ever did have a problem.
 

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I have done some modifications to guns before, but not usually to a carry gun... Other than sights. The one exception is to the Beretta 92. I have installed a factory "D" spring to take 3lbs off the DA pull. But, it is still a factory part, and some factory 92 variants come with the spring already installed.

Other than that, I only keep guns that are modified as range toys, personally.
If you keep the springs within factory specs you'll be okay. I too added factory "D" springs on my Beretta's except for my M9A3 that I believe already came with one? Most people get into trouble when they either use springs that are too light or they try and modify the sear to hammer or sear to striker mating surfaces.

I changed the hammer on my CZ 97 B because there's more to hold onto when lowering the hammer on a chambered round. The short reset trigger moves the trigger back 5 millimeters which makes it easier to manipulate. The kit came with lighter trigger, firing pin and hammer springs but I chose to keep the factory springs intact. But I have been working on guns for some time now. For people that aren't sure of what they're doing they're best leaving everything well enough alone.
 

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Yes, the M9A3 is one model of the 92 platform that already comes with the D spring installed.

I have owned 28 Beretta 92 variants over about 28 years. All but my first 1 or 2 had a D spring put into them by me.
 

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I might be an outsider on this one.

My G19 sports a Ghost Evo Elite Trigger hand fitted by me. There is a C/T Laser Grip and an Olight PL-Mini work light.
It rides in a Outlaws brand custom light bearing Kydex holster on a Craft gun belt.
It shoots very well and has not once had a reliability problem of any sort with any ammo.
The stock parts are in safe keeping in case I ever did have a problem.
Those Ghost connectors are a great improvement over the stock factory trigger. Their connectors come in all different angles that affect the trigger weight. Some are drop in some can be adjusted for over travel by filing them down a little at a time until it is just right. Fortunately it's no big deal taking the connector in and out the pistol until you get it right.
 

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Yes, the M9A3 is one model of the 92 platform that already comes with the D spring installed.

I have owned 28 Beretta 92 variants over about 28 years. All but my first 1 or 2 had a D spring put into them by me.
That's a whole lotta' Beretta's I only have four. From what I understand is that the "D" spring first came out in their double action only guns? Then later on adapted to their 92 series DA/SA's?

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Yes, it originally came out in the DAO 92 models, which are no longer made. There is no reason that all 92 models cannot come with the D spring already installed. It works reliably with all ammo brands.

Some people put even lighter hammer springs, but I never go lighter than the 16lb D spring.

Actually, I have owned 38 Berettas total in my lifetime... Different models...
 

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What is everyone's thought on modding a carry gun?

I am awaiting the arrival of a Glock 29 10mm and already have a list of want to do mods as listed below:

Barrel- mainly for a fully supported barrel to shoot my hot handloads.

Sights- simply because the factory sights are junk and I want fiber optics to aid my old eyes.

Trigger- the trigger on Glocks leave a lot to be desired. Not looking to go below 3# pull bit would like a solid wall and nice, crisp break.

Any thoughts on the pros & cons of modding that which you will carry regularly?
frankly, i have been told by the several people that work at the range i go to, including a very well known CCW instructor, (and a lawyer that specializes in gun cases, and i took his class as well) that it is best to leave a gun stock, for ccw. in this way, if one is not a "certified" gunsmith, the prosecution can nail you big time, for being "out to kill people", rather than defending yourself.

also,, should there be a civil lawsuit (and there usually always is by the surviving family), thier lawyer(s) can tear you apart on the witness stand as well, and "monkeying around, with NO knowledge" of what you are doing.

even a "certified" gunsmith, doing the work, can get you into trouble, as you allowed/paid for, to soup up an ordinary self defense gun, into a killing machine.

now, all this can be the "usual" scare tactics of those that want to play things safe.

but i know from my point of view, my 2 carry guns are bone stock, and will stay that way.

maybe you ought to consult a lawyer in YOUR area, about making gun mods (or replacements) to a CCW gun?

that free first time advice lawyers give out?

may save you some jail time, and legal issues later..???
 

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frankly, i have been told by the several people that work at the range i go to, including a very well known CCW instructor, (and a lawyer that specializes in gun cases, and i took his class as well) that it is best to leave a gun stock, for ccw. in this way, if one is not a "certified" gunsmith, the prosecution can nail you big time, for being "out to kill people", rather than defending yourself.

also,, should there be a civil lawsuit (and there usually always is by the surviving family), thier lawyer(s) can tear you apart on the witness stand as well, and "monkeying around, with NO knowledge" of what you are doing.

even a "certified" gunsmith, doing the work, can get you into trouble, as you allowed/paid for, to soup up an ordinary self defense gun, into a killing machine.

now, all this can be the "usual" scare tactics of those that want to play things safe.

but i know from my point of view, my 2 carry guns are bone stock, and will stay that way.

maybe you ought to consult a lawyer in YOUR area, about making gun mods (or replacements) to a CCW gun?

that free first time advice lawyers give out?

may save you some jail time, and legal issues later..???
Some of it is, some of it isn't.

It would probably depend on what type of modifications are made? If it was that much of a problem you'd think by now that all of the manufacturers and distributers of aftermarket parts and accessories would have been litigated out of business? That's where the money is. Same for gunsmiths who do any type of work on firearms. That being the case who would even want to be a gunsmith? As they work on thousands of guns during their lifetimes, some of which will be used in self defense situations with modifications/repairs that they performed. Laser sights, night sights, RMR sights, detachable flashlights are all modifications that some shyster lawyer could claim turns your gun into a more efficient "killing machine". Yet guns are still being manufactured with light rails and people are carrying them on a regular basis with those modifications.

I remember at one time all of the controversy regarding hollow points and so called "cop killer bullets". I have yet to hear of anyone getting sued because they used them for self defense? After all they too turn your gun into a more efficient "killing machine". It could also be argued that by improving the action of a self defense weapon the shooter would be more accurate with their weapon and lesson the chance of killing or injuring an innocent bystander.

In some state's that have stand your ground laws. If an individual was justified in using deadly physical force they can't be held civilly liable. If you live in one of those states, I don't think that it would matter what type of firearm was used or if it had been modified? Dead is dead and the individual who was under attack was legally justified in killing their assailant. The gun was therefore used in a lawful manner for its intended purpose.

From the National Conference of State Legislatures:
Self-defense laws in at least 23 states (Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee West Virginia and Wisconsin) provide civil immunity under certain self- defense circumstances.
Modifications to a firearm that could easily result in an accidental discharge is an entirely different matter. Modifications such as altering a firearms safety systems or modifying the trigger to the point that any amount of movement could set it off. You'd be walking around with an accident waiting to happen. Polishing out a guns internal parts is really not that much different than firing a thousand or so rounds out of it. The so called break in period. The only difference between an aluminum, steel or polymer trigger shoe is the material that it's made of.

There is no reason in the world why anyone with a mechanical aptitude and an understanding of how the gun that they're working on operates. Shouldn't be able to successfully work on their own gun(s). If they don't have those abilities, then ABSOLUTELY NOT.


Able to be sued for use of hollow point? - USA Carry
www.usacarry.com › forums › deadly-force-and-the-law
To my knowledge, there is no law against hollow point bullets except in NJ. A clever prosecutor could use the fact that you have hollow points to say that you were planning to use your weapon (ala Dirty Harry). But, you could be in trouble with jacketed rounds if one happened to go through the intended target and strike someone else.
 

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Some of it is, some of it isn't.

It would probably depend on what type of modifications are made? If it was that much of a problem you'd think by now that all of the manufacturers and distributers of aftermarket parts and accessories would have been litigated out of business? That's where the money is. Same for gunsmiths who do any type of work on firearms. That being the case who would even want to be a gunsmith? As they work on thousands of guns during their lifetimes, some of which will be used in self defense situations with modifications/repairs that they performed. Laser sights, night sights, RMR sights, detachable flashlights are all modifications that some shyster lawyer could claim turns your gun into a more efficient "killing machine". Yet guns are still being manufactured with light rails and people are carrying them on a regular basis with those modifications.

I remember at one time all of the controversy regarding hollow points and so called "cop killer bullets". I have yet to hear of anyone getting sued because they used them for self defense? After all they too turn your gun into a more efficient "killing machine". It could also be argued that by improving the action of a self defense weapon the shooter would be more accurate with their weapon and lesson the chance of killing or injuring an innocent bystander.

In some state's that have stand your ground laws. If an individual was justified in using deadly physical force they can't be held civilly liable. If you live in one of those states, I don't think that it would matter what type of firearm was used or if it had been modified? Dead is dead and the individual who was under attack was legally justified in killing their assailant. The gun was therefore used in a lawful manner for its intended purpose.

From the National Conference of State Legislatures:
Self-defense laws in at least 23 states (Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee West Virginia and Wisconsin) provide civil immunity under certain self- defense circumstances.
Modifications to a firearm that could easily result in an accidental discharge is an entirely different matter. Modifications such as altering a firearms safety systems or modifying the trigger to the point that any amount of movement could set it off. You'd be walking around with an accident waiting to happen. Polishing out a guns internal parts is really not that much different than firing a thousand or so rounds out of it. The so called break in period. The only difference between an aluminum, steel or polymer trigger shoe is the material that it's made of.

There is no reason in the world why anyone with a mechanical aptitude and an understanding of how the gun that they're working on operates. Shouldn't be able to successfully work on their own gun(s). If they don't have those abilities, then ABSOLUTELY NOT.


Able to be sued for use of hollow point? - USA Carry
www.usacarry.com › forums › deadly-force-and-the-law
To my knowledge, there is no law against hollow point bullets except in NJ. A clever prosecutor could use the fact that you have hollow points to say that you were planning to use your weapon (ala Dirty Harry). But, you could be in trouble with jacketed rounds if one happened to go through the intended target and strike someone else.
ok, well, i watcha few very good you tube videos, for very well know people. one is Paul Harrell.

if i recall, it was him that said someone he knows??? or a court trial he was following??? a guy modded his gun. the prosecutor was nailing that guy for doing such, as he wanted to kill people, not as much as defend himself.

now, i cannot recall word for word what Paul had said, but after I watched that video, and then going to a CCW class on the laws in my state, modding a gun that is to be used for self defense (CCW) , and (not the range toy), is just not in one's best interest, and to leave it bone stock...

as we all know, laws vary from state to state, maybe even with in state county lines as well.
 

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ok, well, i watcha few very good you tube videos, for very well know people. one is Paul Harrell.

if i recall, it was him that said someone he knows??? or a court trial he was following??? a guy modded his gun. the prosecutor was nailing that guy for doing such, as he wanted to kill people, not as much as defend himself.

now, i cannot recall word for word what Paul had said, but after I watched that video, and then going to a CCW class on the laws in my state, modding a gun that is to be used for self defense (CCW) , and (not the range toy), is just not in one's best interest, and to leave it bone stock...

as we all know, laws vary from state to state, maybe even with in state county lines as well.
If you're hell bent on going out and killing a bunch of people an unmodified gun will do just fine. Of course lawyers will make up any cock and bull story to try and win a case. That's why they've rightfully earned the name "liars for hire".

As I mentioned in my previous post: "It would probably depend on what type of modifications were made?" I'm sure that if it was that big of a deal the "liars for hire" would have already sued the aftermarket parts manufacturers and distributers out of business. All they would need is just one case. They stand to make a lot more money out of them then some poor schmuck that bought one of their parts and put it in their gun. About the only manufacturer that I know of that is being sued is the one who made the bump stocks that Paddock used. A company that was forced to destroy their inventory of them after they were banned is suing the government for its losses. It will be interesting seeing how this plays out in court.

Polishing out a guns internal parts is really no different than putting a thousand or so rounds out of a brand new gun. Would that be considered modifying the gun? But how could anyone prove that? If you don't understand where I'm coming from regarding that then you probably haven't worked on guns? How about changing recoil springs to a different weight because the gun does not cycle properly with the stock set up and the type of ammo that is being used? Having a gun refinished or cerakoted could be considered a modification? Just changing the grips could be considered a modification? Same for changing the sights. Polishing the feed ramp and chamber could be considered a modification? Where does it end? I'd be willing to bet that thousands upon thousands of guns have been modified to some degree at one time or the other? If not there would be no market for OEM and aftermarket parts and accessories for them. Out of that there are probably hundreds of those so called modified guns that have already been used justifiably for self defense without any legal repercussions.

For a lot of people their so called range gun is their only gun. Why shouldn't they be able to modify it to their liking? Maybe the factory grips are too big or the sights not visible enough but the rest of the gun is perfect for their needs. Maybe the trigger needs a little work so they can be more accurate with it? Maybe the trigger's reach is too short or too long? Maybe they get hammer bite and want to swap out or "bob" the hammer? Out of the millions of people that own guns it would be nearly impossible and cost prohibitive to be able to tailor make one for every individuals needs and physical dimensions. None of those modifications make the gun more lethal, or compel people to go out on a shooting spree or fulfill some fantasy of wanting to kill someone. I doubt very much that criminals would even go to the trouble and expense of modifying a gun that they stole or bought on the black market?

At least in the state where I live you can not be held civilly liable in a case of clear cut justifiable self defense and you are not being charged by your local prosecutor. If you're not being charged and prosecuted your assailant or their family can not file suit against you at least not in state's that have stand your ground laws. We also have state preemption laws where municipalities and counties are prohibited from enacting laws that are more restrictive than the state's. Indeed every state is different.

As far as those you tube video's go I find them entertaining and you'll find all different opinions on just about any subject by any number of "experts". I too took a firearms safety course in order to get my CCW even though a CCW is not required in Arizona to carry a sidearm in public. I also took a more intensive tactical handgun course which covered the use of deadly physical force, along with state and federal firearms laws. None of those courses ever mentioned changing grips, sights, adding lasers or the use of aftermarket parts and accessories. I'm only guessing, but maybe it really wasn't that much of an issue to warrant it? Get caught legally defending yourself using a high capacity feeding devise as they are called in state's where they are prohibited and you'll be charged with a crime. Even if it was legal when you purchased the gun and the gun came standard with it.

Sorry I went long on this, but it had to be said.

  1. Texas company that destroyed bump stocks sues US government ...
    abcnews.go.com › US › wireStory
    Apr 09, 2019 · FORT WORTH, Texas -- A Texas gun company that destroyed more than 73,000 bump stocks when a federal ban on the rapid-fire devices took effect has sued the U.S. government claiming millions of dollars in losses. RW Arms of Fort Worth on Monday announced the lawsuit and said the government took its property "without just compensation"

  1. Company behind bump stocks sued over Las Vegas massacre
    nypost.com › 2017/10/10 › company-behind-bump-stocks
    Oct 10, 2017 · A gun-control group is suing the company that produces bump stocks — devices used by the Las Vegas shooter to make his rifles fire nearly as fast as machine guns — on behalf of the killer’s ...
 

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If you're hell bent on going out and killing a bunch of people an unmodified gun will do just fine. Of course lawyers will make up any cock and bull story to try and win a case. That's why they've rightfully earned the name "liars for hire".

As I mentioned in my previous post: "It would probably depend on what type of modifications were made?" I'm sure that if it was that big of a deal the "liars for hire" would have already sued the aftermarket parts manufacturers and distributers out of business. All they would need is just one case. They stand to make a lot more money out of them then some poor schmuck that bought one of their parts and put it in their gun. About the only manufacturer that I know of that is being sued is the one who made the bump stocks that Paddock used. A company that was forced to destroy their inventory of them after they were banned is suing the government for its losses. It will be interesting seeing how this plays out in court.

Polishing out a guns internal parts is really no different than putting a thousand or so rounds out of a brand new gun. Would that be considered modifying the gun? But how could anyone prove that? If you don't understand where I'm coming from regarding that then you probably haven't worked on guns? How about changing recoil springs to a different weight because the gun does not cycle properly with the stock set up and the type of ammo that is being used? Having a gun refinished or cerakoted could be considered a modification? Just changing the grips could be considered a modification? Same for changing the sights. Polishing the feed ramp and chamber could be considered a modification? Where does it end? I'd be willing to bet that thousands upon thousands of guns have been modified to some degree at one time or the other? If not there would be no market for OEM and aftermarket parts and accessories for them. Out of that there are probably hundreds of those so called modified guns that have already been used justifiably for self defense without any legal repercussions.

For a lot of people their so called range gun is their only gun. Why shouldn't they be able to modify it to their liking? Maybe the factory grips are too big or the sights not visible enough but the rest of the gun is perfect for their needs. Maybe the trigger needs a little work so they can be more accurate with it? Maybe the trigger's reach is too short or too long? Maybe they get hammer bite and want to swap out or "bob" the hammer? Out of the millions of people that own guns it would be nearly impossible and cost prohibitive to be able to tailor make one for every individuals needs and physical dimensions. None of those modifications make the gun more lethal, or compel people to go out on a shooting spree or fulfill some fantasy of wanting to kill someone. I doubt very much that criminals would even go to the trouble and expense of modifying a gun that they stole or bought on the black market?

At least in the state where I live you can not be held civilly liable in a case of clear cut justifiable self defense and you are not being charged by your local prosecutor. If you're not being charged and prosecuted your assailant or their family can not file suit against you at least not in state's that have stand your ground laws. We also have state preemption laws where municipalities and counties are prohibited from enacting laws that are more restrictive than the state's. Indeed every state is different.

As far as those you tube video's go I find them entertaining and you'll find all different opinions on just about any subject by any number of "experts". I too took a firearms safety course in order to get my CCW even though a CCW is not required in Arizona to carry a sidearm in public. I also took a more intensive tactical handgun course which covered the use of deadly physical force, along with state and federal firearms laws. None of those courses ever mentioned changing grips, sights, adding lasers or the use of aftermarket parts and accessories. I'm only guessing, but maybe it really wasn't that much of an issue to warrant it? Get caught legally defending yourself using a high capacity feeding devise as they are called in state's where they are prohibited and you'll be charged with a crime. Even if it was legal when you purchased the gun and the gun came standard with it.

Sorry I went long on this, but it had to be said.

  1. Texas company that destroyed bump stocks sues US government ...
    abcnews.go.com › US › wireStory
    Apr 09, 2019 · FORT WORTH, Texas -- A Texas gun company that destroyed more than 73,000 bump stocks when a federal ban on the rapid-fire devices took effect has sued the U.S. government claiming millions of dollars in losses. RW Arms of Fort Worth on Monday announced the lawsuit and said the government took its property "without just compensation"

  1. Company behind bump stocks sued over Las Vegas massacre
    nypost.com › 2017/10/10 › company-behind-bump-stocks
    Oct 10, 2017 · A gun-control group is suing the company that produces bump stocks — devices used by the Las Vegas shooter to make his rifles fire nearly as fast as machine guns — on behalf of the killer’s ...
yes, bt there is a huge difference between a range toy, and a self/home defense weapon.

sorry it was so short, but i just had to say it.
 

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What is everyone's thought on modding a carry gun?

I am awaiting the arrival of a Glock 29 10mm and already have a list of want to do mods as listed below:

Barrel- mainly for a fully supported barrel to shoot my hot handloads.

Sights- simply because the factory sights are junk and I want fiber optics to aid my old eyes.

Trigger- the trigger on Glocks leave a lot to be desired. Not looking to go below 3# pull bit would like a solid wall and nice, crisp break.

Any thoughts on the pros & cons of modding that which you will carry regularly?
I changed several things in my Glock 23 gen 4...Trigger...now a Grant Defense, rabbit ears slide backplate for easier racking, at 80 years, my hands once in a while complain, larger slide stop and take down bar, Mepro Night Sights...and a nice TC laser sight...that's all...The photo is my 19, transfered all the mods to the 23..Identical.
Glock19.jpg
 
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