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Hi, can anyone help me to identify this old revolver, its a .38 spl. I believe that was made in early 20's. The marking in the barrel are ineligible. I could barely read the inscription 'Trade Marck' in the logo.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I don't recognize the logo, and you don't give us any other markings from it, so I can only guess.
I believe that it's a Spanish copy of a Smith & Wesson, probably made in or near Eibar or Guernica.
It's plated, probably with nickle.

It's probably not safe to fire. It certainly isn't worth much.

If you can find any other markings, and can post clear pictures of them, plus a clearer picture of the logo, I might be able to tell you more.
 

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Sometimes you can rub the surface with oil and rag to clean enough to read the inscription.

You can also use a white or black crayon to bring out the marks.


Steve - would this be a SW Model 10 k-frame copy? The vaquero/cowboy with the raised pistol looks familiar.


* try: illegible - can't be read.

ineligible - disqualified.... yea it's probably that too. ;) Don't worry my seplling is worse.
 

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I'm not an expert on S&W models, so I won't try to identify the gun our sample is copying.

That cowboy looks familiar to me, too, but my aged brain no longer allows me full access to its file cabinets.

Your suggestions for mild clean-up and crayon enhancement are spot-on. I wish that I'd remembered that.


Many years ago, there was a huge Mexican and Central-American market for cheap Spanish-made S&W (and even Merwin & Hulbert) knockoffs.
Some of those Spanish pistols were specifically trade-marked for sale in these areas.

If there are proofmarks, they would tell us the pistol's country of origin. If there's a serial number, it might tell us something about the pistol's quality.
(Mexican-market pistols probably didn't require serial numbers, but Spain did require proof testing of most exports.)
 

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There were 4 variations of the S&W Hand Ejector(HE) beginning in the late 1890's thru the 20's. As Steve sez, Spanish manufacturers copied the bejeezes outta 'em. And that's what your revolver appears to be. Probably 20's. The good S&W HE's aren't high-dollar guns even in ex. shape, and unfortunately, your's is kinda sad! At best...75.00. I shoot alot of 100+ yr old guns, but WOULD NOT attempt it w/yours! Still; read, research and enjoy it. A lot of the pleasure in gun ownership is the knowledge of the history of firearms!
 

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It would be interesting to see the side plate, innards, and the rear of the cylinder to see if the chambers are recessed. It has a pinned barrel so whoever made it they were trying to be as much like a S&W as possible right down to the circular logo.
 
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