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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Potential idiot question....

I'm planning to build out an outdoor range in my backyard. Yes, it's large enough. Many neighbors shoot as well.

But how do I keep lead from contaminating the ground and ground water / wells? As simple as shooting only steel? That presents other issues like sparks, ricochets and who knows what else.

So what is my best bet? Or am I thinking too much?
 

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Unless you are shooting a couple 1,000 rounds a day for years on end you are over thinking it, unless you are shooting directly at your well
 

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No worry- it is extremely difficult to get lead poisoning from bullets-period.
(Edit: it can not be done by shooting bullets near water)

Almost all lead poisoning in the past came from TEL (tetra-ethyl-lead, a clear, odorless, colorless liquid) which was used in some paints and gasoline. It was removed from most of the USA in 1990, and outlawed in 1995. It is still available in special circumstances-but not to the public.

If you ever hear of someone getting lead in their drinking water- it did not come from lead bullets.
 

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Because I built my own shooting range and am on well water and I have been know to shoot quite often
 

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Tony, that is a pretty lame non-factual response. At least Higgy Baby had more facts.

I have found that when I ask someone how they know something and they fumble with their response or just say something without supporting detail, they are usually blowing smoke.

So, your response is just an opinion.

Just saying.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To help settle the debate has there been any water contamination that can be attributed to an outdoor range?

If yes was that from a backyard range? Or maybe a Sporting Club, Scout or 4H camp that had significant shooting volume?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, a bit of consultation with Google has given me this conclusion... Don't worry about it.
From page 48 of this EPA Docs
indicated that a minimum of 100,000
rounds per firing lane should be allowed before
lead reclamation occurs.
 

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And the ground water was tested so accurate conclusions could be drawn?
The OP asked a question on a forum, not the EPA. The OP got opinions from members who might know a lot about the subject and I believe he got what he was requesting.
WHAT ARE YOU CONTRIBUTING TO THE CONVERSATION?
 

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Thank you DogFather, the EPA document you sourced provided more than just opinions and I am happy with the information.
 

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The only way to keep lead out of the ground / ground water is to shoot into a steel bullet trap , like those used on indoor shooting ranges . The steel baffels divert the fired bullets down , baffles slow the bullets until they drop into a collection trough . All the fired bullets are trapped and removed to be sold as scrap metal . Sometimes bullet casters will buy the metal as "range scrap" ( when I knew the range owner I could get free scrap to cast bullets with) ... The company I worked for designed and drew the blueprints for the very first indoor shooting range here in Baton Rouge . The entire back wall of the shooting lanes was a large bullet trap , it stopped all the bullets in the trap . That was 40+ years ago and the shooting range is still in business and I still shoot there often ... but no more free range scrap ... the new owners sell everything !
Gary
 
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