Handgun Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

New member and first time poster.

I am not entirely new to guns.
I own a couple bolt action hunting rifles, but am now in the market for some hand guns.

I have fired a few different hand guns but nothing ever felt as good in my hand as the Browning Hi-Power.
It just seemed to naturally point perfectly.
I'm a large guy, 6'3" and I'm left handed.

So, naturally, I'm in the market for a 9mm Hi-Power.

I've been doing my research but I can't seem to find an ultimate compendium of all info for the Hi Power.
I'm not opposed to reading and learning so if anyone has a link to reading material as opposed to providing long answers, I'm open to that too.

First of all, I have some general questions about single-action vs. double action?
What is/are the strategic pros or cons to either one when it comes to the Hi-Power (or the BDA/BDM).

So, I have a few questions that I would very much appreciate it if anyone could enlighten me.

Next, for the regular Hi-Power:
  • I've noted that the Hi-Power (and all variants) offer ambidextrous slide latches/safety but the magazine latch seems to be right handed only. Can this be mastered by a lefty?
  • Are there any gunsmith options to reverse the magazine latch?
  • If not, are there any lefties out there who have mastered a work around for the existing magazine latch?

Secondly, the Hi-Power BDA (not the BDM)
  • All I can find information about manufacture (Wikipedia) indicates this was made in 9mm caliber, and I can find pictures of 9mm versions. But all I can find are the .380 Italian nickel versions (I believe made by Baretta). Do 9mm (any size) exist and if so any ideas where can I find a 9mm version.
  • The magazine latch looks remarkably different on the pictures I've seen so, being a lefty, I naturally find myself wondering again if there is a gunsmith option to reverse the magazine latch?

Thirdly, the Browning BDM (I know it is technically not a Hi-Power)
  • I've been able to find a few decent examples of these, but I've made specific note (from multiple sources) that the BDM is more narrow (and thus feels different) than the standard Hi-Power. Has anybody experience with both? Do they feel/point that different?
  • Again here, the magazine latch looks different than the actual Hi-Power so again, I wonder, are there any gunsmith options to reverse it?

I'm sorry for all the questions.
I really have looked online a lot.
I'd be happy to reply on professional insights from a gun shop but with coronavirus in full swing, the gun shops here all by appointment only and none of them have any Hi-Powers (any variant) in stock.

Thanks in advance for any/all help you can offer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,058 Posts
I suggest to you that your biggest problem with the P.35 "High Power" will be finding an ambidextrous safety lever, and having it properly installed.
Since you're left-handed, you'll need that modification much more than any other.

You can use your left index finger to push the magazine release, if you practice it.
I'm pretty sure that it can't be reversed.

Single-action (SA) vs. double-action (DA) vs. "traditional double-action" (TDA):
(The following is my personal opinion. Other people may disagree.)
• SA vs. DA doesn't matter. You can learn to use either one. But it is helpful to the beginning pistol shooter to have only one, unvarying system to learn. (The Browning P.35 "High-Power" is SA, even though the trigger looks as if it's DA or TDA.)
• The TDA system requires you to switch from DA for its first shot, to SA for subsequent shots. This is difficult for a beginning pistol shooter to manage, while retaining accuracy and reasonably quick effectiveness.

And, BTW, Beretta doesn't make Browning pistols. And I believe that most modern Berettas are TDA.
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Your other problem with the Browning Hi Power, is that FN/Browning quit production in 2017 (last I heard). That means Finding a used one, and prices won’t be low. Or finding a good clone.

”Tactically” disadvantages/advantages of the single action auto loader can be a matter of preference, but here is one mans take, and you can put as much value on it as I charge for giving it:

Pros:
-same trigger pull each time. Easier to learn at first.
-triggers can be more crisp, with less travel , which improves early accuracy.

Cons:
-with a short, light pull, a manual safety that must be disengaged to fire is a must if you want to carry with a round in the chamber.
-a manual safety is just one more potential point of failure under stress.
-carrying with an empty chamber is worse.
-accidentally disengaging the manual safety can be a hazzard while carrying a pistol with a short, light trigger pull.

Unique features of the Hi Power that kind of tell it’s age as a design.
The beavertail is short and the rear travel of the hammer is long. This can lead to hammer bite, pinching the web of a meatier hand, between the hammer and the beaver tail, as the slide cycles. This is especially true for shooters who adopt the more modern high grip that is better for recoil management.

the Hi Power has a magazine safety. The trigger will not drop the hammer without the mag inserted. Not a huge deal to many folks, but most other modern defensive pistols do not have this feature any longer.

the Hi Power is a classic. It is a quality design, and has a well earned reputation. It is also a 1935 design and handguns continued to evolve. It can still be an effective defensive handgun, but it has some idiosyncrasies that come with its charm.

i don’t know what other handguns you have tried, but there are a few, that rival the comfort and fit of a Hi Power.

CZ grip shape is not a distant leap from a Hi Power. But here we get into mostly Traditional Double Action/Single Action pistols. But they offer a few ambidextrous models.

Sig, Beretta, Walther and HK could be worth picking up and feeling as well, but in some of those cases, you need to have an open mind about polymer frames.

Sorry, that is a wordy response. I like the P35 , but it has some quirks that keep Me from having one for carry. That does not mean, that it may not be “The One” you should get. But not knowing what else you have tried and rejected, and why, it’s hard to know exactly what landed you on the Hi Power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
I'm left handed and actually prefer the magazine release on the left side, that's what I'm used to and it does not handicap me a bit.., like Steve said, just use your index finger.

The ambidextrous slide release may be nice, but it's something I could do w/o if I had no choice, either the index finger or slingshotting the slide will do just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
I'm left handed and actually prefer the magazine release on the left side, that's what I'm used to and it does not handicap me a bit.., like Steve said, just use your index finger.

The ambidextrous slide release may be nice, but it's something I could do w/o if I had no choice, either the index finger or slingshotting the slide will do just fine.
I tend to use the over the top slide release method as well, so the slide catch/release location isn't that critical to me either. (To be fair though I am right handed though. so, I haven't experienced the manufacturing bias toward the opposite hand.)

But there are lots of pistols out there with ambi safeties, decockers, mag releases (or reversible releases. I actually think the paddle mag release that HK and Walther use is pretty ingenious. If more people really spent time with it or came to it without a prior bias to the American push button I think it would be the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,619 Posts
I tend to use the over the top slide release method as well, so the slide catch/release location isn't that critical to me either. (To be fair though I am right handed though. so, I haven't experienced the manufacturing bias toward the opposite hand.)

But there are lots of pistols out there with ambi safeties, decockers, mag releases (or reversible releases. I actually think the paddle mag release that HK and Walther use is pretty ingenious. If more people really spent time with it or came to it without a prior bias to the American push button I think it would be the way to go.
Me too. I immediately became accustomed to it.

On some guns the push button release is hard to reach with your thumb. Of course this all depends on the grip size/design and the size or your hand. The spring tension of the mag release is also a factor. Extended mag releases are an option on some. But their major drawback is that they may stick out too far and under certain circumstances disengage inadvertently while the gun is being carried.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,179 Posts
Short answer is to check out CZ.

No go on the BDA/BDM, the support for those items, particularly magazines for the BDM is a non-starter.

Also, have you ever fired a lot of rounds from a Hi Power?

If the site is still up, Stephen Camp's Hi Power s and Handguns was an excellent source. If its not up I think I have all his articles saved as PDFs.


To be continued.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,619 Posts
Short answer is to check out CZ.

No go on the BDA/BDM, the support for those items, particularly magazines for the BDM is a non-starter.

Also, have you ever fired a lot of rounds from a Hi Power?

If the site is still up, Stephen Camp's Hi Power s and Handguns was an excellent source. If its not up I think I have all his articles saved as PDFs.

To be continued.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
I'll second that. My wife and I went out this weekend with my P-01. She said lemme' try that. So I handed her the gun. She was all smiles after firing that gun. She was like: Wow that's really nice! I almost hadda' pry it away from her. I don't think that there's too many guns that handle as well as a CZ for people of all shapes and sizes. She's 5 ft. and I'm 6 ft. she has small hands mine are large.

Indeed out of production guns are not a very good choice no matter how good the gun is. I've got an S&W 469, 669, 3913 and a CS45. Excellent handguns but magazines are getting hard to come by. Numrich Arms still has parts if needed for those guns. I bought mine more as collectors plus they came with extra magazines and I didn't pay more than $400 for any one of them. At one time they were popular with law enforcement when they made the switch to semi auto's. Then came Glocks and that was the end of that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Short answer is to check out CZ.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
Pretty much what I would recommend as well.

For some ambidextrous features, the 85, 75b Omega (which could also offer options for a decocker for DA/SA preference or manual safety if cocked and locked is what is preferred).

full size and mid size options are there also, as well as polymer framed options.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,179 Posts
Have a little more time on my hands today...

Hi All,

New member and first time poster.
Welcome!

I am not entirely new to guns.
I own a couple bolt action hunting rifles, but am now in the market for some hand guns.

I have fired a few different hand guns but nothing ever felt as good in my hand as the Browning Hi-Power.
It just seemed to naturally point perfectly.
I'm a large guy, 6'3" and I'm left handed.
The Hi Power does feel soooo good. But as far as good shooting guns go, they leave a lot to be desired in my opinion. The trigger mechanism of the Hi Power is very unique and there's the issue of the magazine disconnect that can make for more of a mushy trigger feel. Most people disable this.

As far as handedness goes and the Hi Power is concerned, what you see is what you get.

How is your hand size? Lots of people (myself included get ferocious hammer bite due to the shape/dimensions of the hammer and back strap of the Hi Power. Even with a "No bite" hammer they chew me to pieces.

So, naturally, I'm in the market for a 9mm Hi-Power.

I've been doing my research but I can't seem to find an ultimate compendium of all info for the Hi Power.
I'm not opposed to reading and learning so if anyone has a link to reading material as opposed to providing long answers, I'm open to that too.
As I mentioned above followed by another poster sharing the URL, Stephen Camp's Hi Powers and Handguns is probably the best single source of info on the Hi Power.

First of all, I have some general questions about single-action vs. double action?
What is/are the strategic pros or cons to either one when it comes to the Hi-Power (or the BDA/BDM).
So, again, forget the BDA and BDM. The BDA is in fact either a smaller framef Beretta 84 and only came in .380 and was either made by FNH or Beretta and imported as a Browning. Or a larger framed Sig Sauer and came in 9mm and .45ACP.



If you want a BDA style pistol in 9mm, you basically want a Beretta 92 or a Sig 226. The BDM is a non starter outside of a collection piece, more about this below when it gets brought up again.

So, I have a few questions that I would very much appreciate it if anyone could enlighten me.

Next, for the regular Hi-Power:
  • I've noted that the Hi-Power (and all variants) offer ambidextrous slide latches/safety but the magazine latch seems to be right handed only. Can this be mastered by a lefty?


  • I have not seen a HI Power with an ambidextrous slide stop or a reversible magazine catch.

    Using the overhand/power-cycle/slingshot method is going to be your best bet for manipulating the slide. The mag release is OK as you just need to learn to use your index or middle finger to work the mag release.

    Tim Herron is a USPSA Master or Grand Master who is a lefty and his 1911s are in traditional format with no customizations to make them more friendly for left handed shooters.

    [*]Are there any gunsmith options to reverse the magazine latch?
    Anything is possible with enough resources.

    [*]If not, are there any lefties out there who have mastered a work around for the existing magazine latch?
    Yes, see above.

    Secondly, the Hi-Power BDA (not the BDM)
    • All I can find information about manufacture (Wikipedia) indicates this was made in 9mm caliber, and I can find pictures of 9mm versions. But all I can find are the .380 Italian nickel versions (I believe made by Baretta). Do 9mm (any size) exist and if so any ideas where can I find a 9mm version.
    • The magazine latch looks remarkably different on the pictures I've seen so, being a lefty, I naturally find myself wondering again if there is a gunsmith option to reverse the magazine latch?
    As mentioned above, the 9mm and .45 version is a Sig Sauer 226/220 and had a European style mag release in the heel of the grip, not a push button style release like what is currently in a Sig 226.



    Thirdly, the Browning BDM (I know it is technically not a Hi-Power)
    • I've been able to find a few decent examples of these, but I've made specific note (from multiple sources) that the BDM is more narrow (and thus feels different) than the standard Hi-Power. Has anybody experience with both? Do they feel/point that different?
    • Again here, the magazine latch looks different than the actual Hi-Power so again, I wonder, are there any gunsmith options to reverse it?

    I'm sorry for all the questions.
    I really have looked online a lot.
    I'd be happy to reply on professional insights from a gun shop but with coronavirus in full swing, the gun shops here all by appointment only and none of them have any Hi-Powers (any variant) in stock.

    Thanks in advance for any/all help you can offer.
    No worries, that's what the place is here for.

    Again, forget about the BDM.

    You'll have much better success choosing a pistol that is equipped (mostly) the way you want it from the start.

    Earlier I suggested the CZ line, bit after some more thought I'd like to aslo add the Sig 226 SAO Legion and 229 SAO legion.

    The mag catches are reversible and they come with a decent amibi safety and are well equipped out of the box.

    The slide release is still oriented for a right handed shooter, but that's not that big a problem outside of administrative handling.

    As for Traditional Double Action (TDA) vs Single Action Only(SAO) pistols, it really depends.

    I can go either way but I tend to favor pistols that have a consistent weight for pulling the trigger.

    Each has their pros and cons, I'll add some content here in a bit.

    ********

    Other options include the HKP30 and P30L, these are probably the MOST left handed friendly pistols I've ever come across with and can be had in different flavors as far as TDA, with or without a manual safety that can allow for sine action carry / use etc.

 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top