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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchased my first GLOCK this week.

It's a model 27 in 40 caliber, Gen 4, on consignment at a LGS.

An LEO's backup piece. Doesn't look like it was shot much.

Came with 3 mags plus all the various back straps.

I've never had a 40 S&W pistol, but have shot a buddie's 27 a few times.

Looking forward to trying it out.

Looks like I'll have to read up on various ammo choices.
 

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Good. Now the LEO can buy what he really wants. Just out of curiosity, ask the LGS what the LEO is replacing this Glock with.
 

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Nice OP. How has the gun shot for you? I just picked up this NIB Gen 4 G26.

I have three Glocks now, and will be taking this one to the range on Friday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nice OP. How has the gun shot for you? I just picked up this NIB Gen 4 G26.

I have three Glocks now, and will be taking this one to the range on Friday.
I've only had it to the range once.

I was somewhat worried about recoil as many people called it "snappy".

I found the recoil no problem at all. Surprisingly, much lighter that I expected.

I need more practice through, as I was pulling shots to the left. I have smallish hands with short fingers, and need to work on pulling the trigger back, and not to the side. I have the same problem on large (N frame) Smith revolvers.

It will take some getting used to.

But I have the various back straps to try to see which fits best.
 

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For years, when asked by a new shooter (as to which was better, .40 or .45), I always replied that my personal preference was .45 ACP due to the 'soft' feel of the lower velocity recoil, without giving up the terminal effect caused by a much heavier bullet. This response, I realize now, was based entirely on testimony by several inexperienced shooters with very bad fundamentals. While I do still prefer the .45, I now have to admit that the difference is really negligible for an experienced shooter, using the type of grip that is necessary for accurate shooting of multiple rounds. My 'new thinking' is also based on incomplete evidence, but is relevant to the topic because I am less prejudiced against the .40 S&W than I used to be. My experience consisted of one comparison made, one time, with identical XD pistols (except for chambering, of course). My transition between the two pistols was practically seamless, using medium velocity practice ammo. Had I been using bullets of the same weight (one was 180, the other was 230), I doubt seriously that I could have identified which was which, based on recoil. Ammo selection matters, and a .45 ACP in 180 grain, fired at the same velocity as the .40 S&W, will feel the same, I feel fairly certain.

So, my opinion, now, is that if you can shoot fairly well with one, you can do similar with the other. Shooters can shoot, period, with a variety of similar guns and ammo. Don't lock yourself into a cliche, without doing your own testing.
 

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I was on the Hickock 45 chanell yesterday and he was shooting the beretta 92 and sig p226 in 9mm. Both great guns but I did notice the nine hit his gong good but could not knock his rams down.. I've seen him put down the rams with 40sw and 45acp, I'm thinking the 115 or 124fmj ain't got the power to do the job!! Who knows???
 

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I was on the Hickock 45 chanell yesterday and he was shooting the beretta 92 and sig p226 in 9mm. Both great guns but I did notice the nine hit his gong good but could not knock his rams down.. I've seen him put down the rams with 40sw and 45acp, I'm thinking the 115 or 124fmj ain't got the power to do the job!! Who knows???
Sometimes I'll go out with a nine and a .45 along with some empty 2 liter plastic soda bottles. I'll fill the bottles up with sand and shoot them with both. The nine tends to go through them while the .45 blows them apart. For what it's worth that's my take on it. However the nine is obviously easier to control under rapid fire and for follow up shots. The .40 in my opinion is in between and a good compromise between the two. What I like about the .40 is that the guns that are designed for it are the same physical size as their 9mm counterparts. Which is great for those who conceal carry and want a bit more power than what the nine offers. I could never understand why the .40 has gotten such a bad rap? I wish there were more of a variety of compact 10mm. pistols available. As far as I know the Glock G29 is about it? Same for ammo for those guns otherwise I would probably own and carry a few.
 

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With many police depts downsizing to the nine we are full of choices in 40sw trade ins. G22s for $300 or a little more are everywhere!!!! P226s in 40 are out there too. I'm old school,,, anything the nine can do,,, the 40 can do better!!!!
 

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With many police depts downsizing to the nine we are full of choices in 40sw trade ins. G22s for $300 or a little more are everywhere!!!! P226s in 40 are out there too. I'm old school,,, anything the nine can do,,, the 40 can do better!!!!
Yeah, I'm kinda' "bigger is better" too up to a certain point. I own six .44 Magnums, put thousands of full power rounds through them, but never carry them for self defense. That's about as powerful as I want to go for a handgun. I don't even know why I bought them? But I'd never get rid of them, it's just one of those things. I just hadda' have some of the biggest, baddest handguns available at the time. I'm over that now and don't think that there's a .500 Magnum in my future? A .45 can handle just about anything I may come across out in the desert. 9's, 40's and 45's are certainly adequate for personal self defense against two legged creatures.
 

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Enjoy. I don't care for the 26/27 grip and heel, but that is just me.
Ammo? I run HST 165 grain or Golden Saber Bonded in the same weight.
I have never been a heavy for caliber fan, but ended up with a case of 180 HST .gov overrun. For the price I can be flexible. Lostwife uses .40 as well, she says it feels like it has some Brass.
Try a few and see what the gun and the hand likes.
 

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I've been carrying my P226 40sw in the woods (backup) lately. My 629 is heavy and at 70 I'm running out of gas so to speak. I load the sig with Double Tap 200gr FMJ FPs, those make that baby rock!!! They're also accurate as all get up too. I think buffalo bore makes 124gr and 147gr outdoorsman load in 9mm but I'm kinda trusting the 200gr 40 load more. The nine can't spit out anything in 200gr or even 180gr.
 

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I've been carrying my P226 40sw in the woods (backup) lately. My 629 is heavy and at 70 I'm running out of gas so to speak. I load the sig with Double Tap 200gr FMJ FPs, those make that baby rock!!! They're also accurate as all get up too. I think buffalo bore makes 124gr and 147gr outdoorsman load in 9mm but I'm kinda trusting the 200gr 40 load more. The nine can't spit out anything in 200gr or even 180gr.
I'm not a Sig guy, so I don't know how well yours can handle a steady diet of max loads. But the 226 looks like a strong, all steel pistol, which gives it a leg up in the sturdiness department. Shooting 200 grain bullets at high velocity gets you into the 10mm range, which I like a lot for a woods gun. If you shoot these hot rounds a lot, you might want to consider the 10mm. You could shoot it at the same velocity, but at lower pressures, without stressing it beyond the manufacturers recommendations...or, you could go up more with the powder charge and get very near to the terminal result of a .41 magnum, which is not that much under a .44 magnum. The G20, even with 16 rounds, seems easier to carry than a Blackhawk or Red Hawk in .44 magnum, or a 629, for that matter.

I don't live in bear country, but I carry a Glock G20 in the woods, as a 'feel-good' measure against the likelihood of surprising a bunch of hungry feral hogs. They nearly always run away, but they get confused sometimes when surprised and are just as likely to run at you, if you approach them from downwind. They have poor vision, so they rely on scent and noise for their 'flight' warning. A stealthy squirrel hunter can easily bumble into the midst of them, carrying nothing but a bolt action .22, and that can be very exciting, if they run the wrong way. So far, I have just been carrying 180 grain FMJs, but I can bump up to 220 grain max loads, if I ever deem it to be necessary. I haven't done the 220 grain yet, because I don't hunt as much as I used to, so I don't yet see the need for a stronger set of springs, which may be needed to protect the frame from the added recoil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Being a revolver guy, for woods carry I'd select ether my 629 or Super Blackhawk if I was worried about big critters -- at lease if I was outside of California.

In CA, open carry is prohibited, so I would have to carry one of the three guns on my CCW license -- and keep it concealed.

I'd choose my LCR 357 with either BB 180 gr or Double Tap 200 gr lead flat points.

After I can shoot it well, perhaps I'll add the Glock 27 to my carry license.
 

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I'm not a Sig guy, so I don't know how well yours can handle a steady diet of max loads. But the 226 looks like a strong, all steel pistol, which gives it a leg up in the sturdiness department. Shooting 200 grain bullets at high velocity gets you into the 10mm range, which I like a lot for a woods gun. If you shoot these hot rounds a lot, you might want to consider the 10mm. You could shoot it at the same velocity, but at lower pressures, without stressing it beyond the manufacturers recommendations...or, you could go up more with the powder charge and get very near to the terminal result of a .41 magnum, which is not that much under a .44 magnum. The G20, even with 16 rounds, seems easier to carry than a Blackhawk or Red Hawk in .44 magnum, or a 629, for that matter.

I don't live in bear country, but I carry a Glock G20 in the woods, as a 'feel-good' measure against the likelihood of surprising a bunch of hungry feral hogs. They nearly always run away, but they get confused sometimes when surprised and are just as likely to run at you, if you approach them from downwind. They have poor vision, so they rely on scent and noise for their 'flight' warning. A stealthy squirrel hunter can easily bumble into the midst of them, carrying nothing but a bolt action .22, and that can be very exciting, if they run the wrong way. So far, I have just been carrying 180 grain FMJs, but I can bump up to 220 grain max loads, if I ever deem it to be necessary. I haven't done the 220 grain yet, because I don't hunt as much as I used to, so I don't yet see the need for a stronger set of springs, which may be needed to protect the frame from the added recoil.
Sig's are pretty beefy handguns, it will take an extraordinary amount of rounds to wear one out.
 

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My P226 is now a couple hundred rds shy of 13,000rds. It's only had a few failure to feeds with remington 180gr range ammo way back under 5,000rds. It's been flawless and since I put the tlr hl lite on it now shoots even better. I guess the lite is balancing the weight out for me. Sig has made a ton of 40sw for police agency's so I'm sure they know how to build them right..
 
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