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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have a beretta 92fs and i went shooting today and after 2 clips (after the gun warmed up) it kept jamming (smoke stacking and having trouble loading) every shot any help here? its had over 2000 rounds through it, thank you for your help! btw this is my first post
 

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My husband has a beretta 92fs and has the exact same problem. His gun has about 3500 rounds through it. It was getting so maddening that we wern't sure if he was going to keep the gun. We found that he just needs to make sure he cleans his gun before we go out. If it is clean it never jams, no matter what we put through it. It is just a hygene sensitive gun.
 

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Not only cleanliness, but proper lubrication is needed for ANY autoloading handgun.

When I was in the military, I oversaw the conversion to the Beretta 92s (M9s) at two different bases. In response to requests for information on reliability, we tested several of the new Berettas, and even with the hot mil-spec ammo, they would choke if clean but not lubed. Some commercial ammo is kinda weak, too, which can exacerbate the problem. For instance, I recently chronographed some of the Federal Champion 9mm that Walmart sells, and although it was very accurate, it clocked very slow for 115 grain 9mm ammo. Some individual rounds were barely supersonic (under 1100 FPS) out of a 4.5" barreled Glock.

When clean and lubed, the Berettas are paragons of reliability; I've owned several over the years, and if I hadn't converted to Glocks, I'd probably still be shooting them.


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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Not only cleanliness, but proper lubrication is needed for ANY autoloading handgun.

When I was in the military, I oversaw the conversion to the Beretta 92s at two different bases. In response to requests for information on reliability, we tested several of the new Berettas, and even with the hot mil-spec ammo, they would choke if clean but not lubed. Some commercial ammo is kinda weak, too, which can exacerbate the problem. For instance, I recently chronographed some of the Federal Champion 9mm that Walmart sells, and although it was very accurate, it clocked very slow for 115 grain 9mm ammo. Some individual rounds were barely supersonic (under 1100 FPS) out of a 4.5" barreled Glock.

When clean and lubed, the Berettas are paragons of reliability; I've owned several over the years, and if I hadn't converted to Glocks, I'd probably still be shooting them.

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thank you for your reply. can you school me or is there a right up on proper lubrication of the 92fs? this is my first handgun as i just turned 22. thank you for all your help?
 

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I agree about the ammo.
Are you using the same ammo that you have always used?
I had the same problem with my 92FS, it was clean, but the ammo I was using caused three different guns to jam. Changed ammo, no further problems.
 

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it sounds like limp wristing to me
 

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thank you for your reply. can you school me or is there a right up on proper lubrication of the 92fs? this is my first handgun as i just turned 22. thank you for all your help?
To summarize -- if it's made of steel, or it's a metal moving part, make sure it has a light coating of oil. Just clean the weapon and then wipe everything with a lightly oiled rag. In the military, as well as after I got out, I've used BreakFree CLP both for cleaning and lubrication. It's probably not the best item for either task, but it's very good, and any CLP left behind after cleaning acts as a lubricant. Contrast that with any oil-cutting cleaning solvent left behind in any nooks and crannies; it evaporates later on and leaves a dry spot that has all the oil chemically removed, which makes a prime area for accelerated wear or rust to attack. Put a separate drop of oil on each frame slide rail, and a drop on the short rails under the chamber end of the barrel, near the locking block. Reassemble the weapon, and work the slide back and forth manually a few times, then wipe off any excess lube seeping out.

If you are ever deployed to (or living outdoors in) the desert, you'll need different instructions, but for most folks, this works just fine.
 

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Oiling is needed in the "high desert" too

To summarize -- if it's made of steel, or it's a metal moving part, make sure it has a light coating of oil. . . . . Put a separate drop of oil on each frame slide rail, and a drop on the short rails under the chamber end of the barrel, near the locking block. Reassemble the weapon, and work the slide back and forth manually a few times, then wipe off any excess lube seeping out.

If you are ever deployed to (or living outdoors in) the desert, you'll need different instructions, but for most folks, this works just fine.
What he said. :mrgreen:

I left my 92FS Centurion in my gun safe for a couple of years. Took it out for a friend to "try it".
She had one or two smokestacks with two different mags. I accused her of "limp wristing".
"So you try it, HOTSHOT ! ! !
I did. I had one or two smokestacks with two different mags.
Must be the 17 year old springs in the 92 are tired, eh ?

I cleaned it really well, and took it to my gunsmith.
Uh, the gunsmith said the problem was NOT the Beretta springs without even "looking".

He lubed it "VERY lightly" in the proper places with some "miracle stuff" allegedly sold to the military.
He fired 10 rounds, no problem.
I bought those and the remaining 40 in the box. I bought a tube of the lube.
Then I ran 140 rounds through it.
Back to the good 'ol days of no failures. Eats any ammo just fine.

Hint: Just like my "friend", the 92 really likes proper care and feeding. :smt023
 

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I have a 92 FS and can honestly say that I have never had a FTE or FTF with this pistol. I would suspect one of three things: type of ammo (although mine seems to gobble up whatever I run through it), a magazine issue. or lubrication.
 

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just a note about cleaning and lubrication. i bought a used H&K USP 45 many years ago and shot it many times although i didn't count bullets. anyway, i decided from day one that i will never clean it to see if it lives up to its expectation, which it's supposed to be super reliable. in one test they purposefully lodged a bullet in the barrel and fired a second round, which cleared the barrel and was still able to shoot afterwards. to make a long story short, it has never jammed on me once and i have never cleaned it or lubricated it once.
 
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