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Good video. I was very familiar with my firearm before taking a ccw class. I was amazed how many people were not. The training included some live fire exercises. I remember looking at other peoples targets thinking there ain't no way they could shoot somebody unless it was some kind of accident. I found the legal info most helpful. Knowing the laws of different states. Also shooting something very close like 2 feet was not something I had ever practiced but when you think about it that is probably a very likely situation in self-defense shooting.
 

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Good video. I was very familiar with my firearm before taking a ccw class. I was amazed how many people were not. The training included some live fire exercises. I remember looking at other peoples targets thinking there ain't no way they could shoot somebody unless it was some kind of accident. I found the legal info most helpful. Knowing the laws of different states. Also shooting something very close like 2 feet was not something I had ever practiced but when you think about it that is probably a very likely situation in self-defense shooting.

Years ago, when I took my class, there were people in the concealed carry class that had NEVER shot a gun. That is NOT the place for instuction. You are there to get a concealed carry permit. But, the instructors do baby those people.

There was 1 old lady there that they let her just point the gun downrange between stages, instead of putting the gun down and picking it back up for each stage.

I always thought the score to pass should have been 1 more than whatever she got. They let her take the test multiple times before she passed too.
 

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The number one question to ask anybody who is considering getting a CCL and carrying is:
If the circumstances are correct can and WILL you shoot another human being and end their life?

If they cannot, unequivocally, say yes, then they have no business getting a CCL and carrying.

There’s way too many folk who think just having a gun is some magic thing that will protect them, that pulling out their gun will be enough, that showing their gun will scare off the threat, or that they’ll be able to “just shoot them in the leg” or some other such nonsense.

NO, if you don’t think - make that KNOW - that, if the circumstances are correct you CAN and WILL take another’s life then look towards some of the less lethal means of defense. You have no business carrying a gun.


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The number one question to ask ... WILL you shoot another human being and end their life?
I think that is the wrong question. (The content but poorly framed.)

"Am I will to defend My Life?" is the question that I ask.
The effects of defending life will extreme prejudice is devastating to most people. There will, most likely, be psychological consequences but to frame the entire question on taking a life causes a whole set of legal problems and consequences.
Like: "why do you want to kill someone?"; "why did you go out searching for someone to kill?"; etc.; etc.
The actual words mean specific things in the legal community and phrasing things to protect ourselves in court or in an investigation is just as important as training to defend life and to continue living.
 

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This is probably the only discussion which should occur before firearms safety or at least during a firearms safety discussion. Let's call it a Pre-discussion. This was first breeched in my education at the police academy and the instructors called it "The Moral Pause," which I believe is an excellent term. If you have that moral pause, that difficulty in being able to defend a life, probably yours during a life and death, or serious potential injury, it was discussed at that time that people should reconsider becoming a police officer. The "pause" portion might get you killed. This is the concern I have now watching hours of police officers in online videos wearing body/badge cams, confronting bad actors who will kill them and demanding, "Drop the gun, Drop the Gun!" simply because they know via that camera there is an audience who will second guess their response. Now, I call that "The Tactical Pause" because the officers have already dealt with their concern of The Moral Pause or they wouldn't be cops. Now, you can decide if that tactical pause will also get you killed. Police officers who train well (I prefer the term "educate") will develop tactics which will just about be on "auto-pilot." So when they are in a life and death struggle or confrontation, they will resort to that auto-training and respond as required. A nice review guys...good points all around and yes, civilians also must deal with the concept of The Moral Pause, if they do not have the option to retreat. Safe Thanksgiving everyone.
 

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This is probably the only discussion which should occur before firearms safety or at least during a firearms safety discussion. Let's call it a Pre-discussion. This was first breeched in my education at the police academy and the instructors called it "The Moral Pause," which I believe is an excellent term. If you have that moral pause, that difficulty in being able to defend a life, probably yours during a life and death, or serious potential injury, it was discussed at that time that people should reconsider becoming a police officer. The "pause" portion might get you killed. This is the concern I have now watching hours of police officers in online videos wearing body/badge cams, confronting bad actors who will kill them and demanding, "Drop the gun, Drop the Gun!" simply because they know via that camera there is an audience who will second guess their response. Now, I call that "The Tactical Pause" because the officers have already dealt with their concern of The Moral Pause or they wouldn't be cops. Now, you can decide if that tactical pause will also get you killed. Police officers who train well (I prefer the term "educate") will develop tactics which will just about be on "auto-pilot." So when they are in a life and death struggle or confrontation, they will resort to that auto-training and respond as required. A nice review guys...good points all around and yes, civilians also must deal with the concept of The Moral Pause, if they do not have the option to retreat. Safe Thanksgiving everyone.
 

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Now, I call that "The Tactical Pause" because the officers have already dealt with their concern of The Moral Pause or they wouldn't be cops.
That is a very big assumption!
People become cops for very different reason and, for many, this moral decision (to preserve life) is never made. For example, the Shelby County Sheriff offers/offered health insurance to their reserve deputies. Because the Sheriff offered free insurance, many people joined the reserve ranks. One such reserve deputy was tasked with transporting a criminal in a cruiser. It was never known what exactly happened but the criminal attacked the deputy and she allowed herself to be killed without a fight. She curled up in a ball in the front floorboard of her cruiser while the criminal shot her with her own firearm. This LEO never made the decision to preserve life. Undoubtedly, there are many others.

Maybe this decisive lack is the reason for many of the bully cops that exist. A big bluff to intimidate instead of the confident knowing of how they will respond only if needed.
 
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