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  1. #21
    SAS MAYHEM's Avatar
    SAS MAYHEM is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hideit View Post
    to sas mayhem
    buy her the 22
    one she likes it and will have fun shooting it and get REAL comfortable
    then get the PPS because it is the same dimensions - identical except for the external safety
    once she is comfortable with the size and feel of the 22 it would be a very easy pic for her to pick up the PPS - she should feel verycomfortable with the 9mm

    Yeah I'm getting the P22, very comfortable pistol to shoot, and then I'm move to the P99. And it looks damn good.

  2. #22
    LaSalle is offline Junior Member
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    P22 is going to be my next gun purchase. I can get one for $269 as opposed to $390 for a ruger. It looks damn nice, but I havent shot one yet. As far as .22 for concealed carry I would agree that it would be better than nothing. Hell someone might have a better chance at getting several .22 shots on target if they cannot control a larger caliber. My wife is still learning how to shoot and she can hit very well with a .22. She has trouble still with my 9mm and cannot hit anything with my buddies .45. So I would feel more comfortable with her carrying a .22 as opposed to a .45. As for a 9mm I think she still needs practice and will be able to master it eventually.

  3. #23
    Pointblank's Avatar
    Pointblank is offline Junior Member
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    I was an LEO for 32 years. On one occasion I went to a house on an assault call. The "victim", who personally came to the door, turned out to be shot in the upper eye socket with a .22 (self-inflicted). He looked like he had been worked over with a lead pipe, but he was able to walk and talk and nobody knew he was shot until the hospital couldn't figure out why he was responding so peculiarly to treatment and xrayed him. When I came into work the next day they told me he had a bullet in him. I wouldn't go below a .380 for self-defense and even that is marginal.

  4. #24
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    I'm kind of stumped on why people complain about recoil for a SD gun. In the event of ever using one, the last thing that's gonna be on your mind is "wow this gun kicks pretty hard." I realize that follow-up shots will be harder to hit on target because of the recoil the higher up in caliber you go, but generally speaking SD gunfights happen in the area of 2-7 yards. At two yards, you don't bother aiming, you just point and shoot. And if you can't put a bullet anywhere near your attacker at seven yards with a .38+, you won't do it with a .22. If aiming the second, third, fourth, fifth, etc. shots is a priority, I would think the added damage/trauma you would acquire on the attacker after scoring a hit with a much larger caliber would outweight the disadvantage of having to take a split second more to aim properly on subsequent shots. But that's just me.

  5. #25
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by fivehourfrenzy View Post
    I'm kind of stumped on why people complain about recoil for a SD gun. In the event of ever using one, the last thing that's gonna be on your mind is "wow this gun kicks pretty hard." I realize that follow-up shots will be harder to hit on target because of the recoil the higher up in caliber you go, but generally speaking SD gunfights happen in the area of 2-7 yards. At two yards, you don't bother aiming, you just point and shoot. And if you can't put a bullet anywhere near your attacker at seven yards with a .38+, you won't do it with a .22.
    Any defense gun must be trained with. A gun that intimidates the shooter is one that he/she won't shoot in practice. We may not notice the recoil when shooting for blood, but we notice it at the range, and it is (partially) at the range that we learn how to survive the fight.

    A .22 that she shoots well and enjoys is far better than the .38 she dislikes and doesn't carry. Just train for rapid bursts to the head, which is easy with a .22. A .22 in the eye will end most fights pretty quickly.

    As I believe Mark Moritz wrote: "The First Rule of Gunfighting is: Have a gun!"
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    Any defense gun must be trained with. A gun that intimidates the shooter is one that he/she won't shoot in practice. We may not notice the recoil when shooting for blood, but we notice it at the range, and it is (partially) at the range that we learn how to survive the fight.

    A .22 that she shoots well and enjoys is far better than the .38 she dislikes and doesn't carry. Just train for rapid bursts to the head, which is easy with a .22. A .22 in the eye will end most fights pretty quickly.

    As I believe Mark Moritz wrote: "The First Rule of Gunfighting is: Have a gun!"
    Point taken. IMO, why not have the .22 for target practice and training, occasionally train with the larger caliber used for carry, then simply carry the larger caliber as the SD weapon? Each gun shoots differently, but that would be my plan of action. What's the deal with the .38 special anyway? Every single female I've ever known to carry a handgun had a .38 special. No 9mms, no .40s, no .45s, no mags, just the .38 special.

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