Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1
    Bigjoedo's Avatar
    Bigjoedo is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    30

    CCW pistol VS revolver

    Hello,

    I just finished reading "The Concealed Handgun Manual" by Chris Bird. Now I'm confused about the best gun for CCW. He states revolvers are more reliable than semi- automatic pistols.

    I'm trying to decide between a Taurus .357 revolver or Millennium Pro 9mm. This will be for CC only and I will do target practice at a local range to improve my skills and accuracy. I realize no gun is perfect, but want a reliable gun when I need to use a gun. Taurus has guns that fall within my limited price range. Any thoughts? Thanks for the help.

    Joe

  2. #2
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
    TOF is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northern Arizona
    Posts
    3,015
    I have had problems with both and had excellent results with both. They are made by man therefore some will not work quite right.

    I currently carry a M&P40 or Ruger GP100 dependant on mood. I don't feel under gunned with either.

    Get either and in a year or so get the other. Sooner if you can afford it.


  3. #3
    greenjeans is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    103
    I also carry either, depending on the mood. I have a Taurus Model 85 and a S&W 642 that I carry regularly. Both have been good revolvers. I don't have any Taurus Semiautos right now, but have owned a PT145 and PT140. They were both reliable pistols. I do carry a revolver more often just because I like them. If you buy the .357, you can also shoot .38 specials which are cheaper and lots more fun to practice with.

  4. #4
    JeffWard's Avatar
    JeffWard is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    St Pete Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,932
    I'll take 99.99% reliability and a 10+1 capacity all day, over "100%" reliability and 5 rounds...

    Give me my XD9SC, my XD45, or my Keltec P-3AT.

    Combined 3000 rounds??? ZERO failures to fire from all three.

  5. #5
    Baldy's Avatar
    Baldy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Port St.John,FL.
    Posts
    6,741
    Age old story as it's the Indian not the arrows that make the difference. Either way you go is OK as long as you practice and make yourself good with your choice. Good luck.

  6. #6
    TerryP Guest
    I carry a Ruger SP101 in 357 mag and like the revolver. I think most decent autos have solved the reliability issues of yesteryear and are close to a good revolver in reliability. I really don't venture places that I feel I need the latest 17 round mag pistol but it doesn't hurt to have it. To me it's like the old issue do you prefer a Chevy or a Ford pickup truck. I would see if you could try each that you are looking at and judge for yourself which you shoot better.

  7. #7
    submoa is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    784
    All handguns are a compromise.

    Choosing a CCW is a combination of where your skills are, reliability of equipment, concealability and comfort.

    If you want the edge in SD situations, hang out with buddies who carry as well.

  8. #8
    PhilR. is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    982
    Although there are many Taurus autos that run just fine, overall the Millenium line could not be considered a highly reliable line as compared to Glock or Sig or similar. Between the two handguns you mention, I would pick the revolver all the way, as I would not want to bet my life on a Millenium.

    Then again, when one considers that a new Taurus will most likely run over $300, I would just save a bit more and get either a new Ruger, or a used Glock or Sig.....

    PhilR.

  9. #9
    godadone is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle, Washington
    Posts
    5
    Revolvers take less training in a failure to fire situation than an autoloader does.

  10. #10
    michael P. is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    51
    I would pick a simiauto. You just need to learn how to clear malfunctions quickly. It takes a lot for these guns to have a major malfunction that cant be fix very quickly in the field. If you carry good ammo, that should help cut down on the malfunctions.

  11. #11
    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    3,373
    I've used both over the years. Right now it's a PT140. It's proven itself quite well after my range torture tests and had earned it's spot in the rotation.

  12. #12
    Wyatt's Avatar
    Wyatt is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The Naked City
    Posts
    713
    Shot placement is the most important factor, period. And this depends on training and practice. So if you plan to put in a significant amount of practice (and you should) and money is an issue, tend toward a reliable 9MM. While a .357 is cheaper to shoot with .38's instead of the magnum loads, it is still twice a expensive to shoot as the 9MM.

    Otherwise it comes down to feel and preference. Try both and go with tyhe one you shoot better.

  13. #13
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
    TOF is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northern Arizona
    Posts
    3,015
    Quote Originally Posted by Wyatt View Post
    Shot placement is the most important factor, period. And this depends on training and practice. So if you plan to put in a significant amount of practice (and you should) and money is an issue, tend toward a reliable 9MM. While a .357 is cheaper to shoot with .38's instead of the magnum loads, it is still twice a expensive to shoot as the 9MM.

    Otherwise it comes down to feel and preference. Try both and go with tyhe one you shoot better.
    Not if you load your own.


  14. #14
    Liko81 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by Bigjoedo View Post
    Hello,

    I just finished reading "The Concealed Handgun Manual" by Chris Bird. Now I'm confused about the best gun for CCW. He states revolvers are more reliable than semi- automatic pistols.

    I'm trying to decide between a Taurus .357 revolver or Millennium Pro 9mm. This will be for CC only and I will do target practice at a local range to improve my skills and accuracy. I realize no gun is perfect, but want a reliable gun when I need to use a gun. Taurus has guns that fall within my limited price range. Any thoughts? Thanks for the help.

    Joe

    There are more concerns than reliability, though of course that's a big one.

    * Ammo Capacity - your average compact 9mm auto will carry about twice as many rounds as a .38 or .357 revolver. Whether this really matters however depends on the auto you are considering; If you're comparing a .357 revolver to a .45ACP semi (a decent comparison in terms of punch), you're only looking at two extra rounds. Comparing a .38/.357 to a 9mm however, the auto generally comes out ahead.

    * Concealability - In general, autos are more concealable than revolvers because of the bulk of the cylinder. However, it again depends on the gun. A G26 is heavier than your average Rossi or S&W .38 snubby (they're very roughly the same dimensions), so you can throw the 628 in a pocket while the Glock will need slightly more attention to how that pocket sags. A Taurus Judge, however, is going to be more difficult to hide than a Kimber .45 (even full-size).

    * Comfort - Usually, the difference between a full-size pistol and a compact from the same company is barrel length. The grip is largely unchanged. It's generally not until you get to sub-compacts like the G26 and XD9SC that the grip is affected to the point where controlling the weapons becomes more difficult. By contrast, small revolvers very quickly get small handles, the logic being that if you're not firing a big comfortable hunting revolver, you're firing a BUG. Also, revolvers generally have a higher bore axis; the bullet to be fired is further from your highest point of control on the grip. That increases muzzle climb and the pounding of the grip into the web of your hand (uncomfortable).

    * Reliability - Yes, it's still important. There's something to be said about "six for sure". A revolver will simply never fail to feed, eject or cycle. A failure to fire is fixed with a subsequent pull of the trigger. The only thing that stops it dead is a squib. Autos simply can't compete; the fact that the bullet is moved around within the gun means that while stripping, lifting and chambering each round, something can go wrong. However, the Browning action's been around for almost a century, and even given that the possibility of a malfunction exists, the development of autoloaders has made that possibility EXTREMELY low on most guns. Gun manufacturing companies live and die by their reliability just like their users. If the gun-owning population as a whole does not feel they can trust gun X, the manufacturer of gun X is in trouble and must fix the design VERY quickly or go out of business.

    It really all comes down to the gun you are most comfortable with on all levels. You must find a gun that carries comfortably, fires comfortably, and to which you are comfortable trusting your life and those of your loved ones in any situation. If that gun is a Rossi .38, that's fine. If it's an M&P 9mm Compact, great. If it's a Colt Python, more power to ya. If it's a Kimber Para Carry .45, you go with it. NO ONE can tell you that YOUR GUN doesn't meet YOUR NEEDS better than YOU.

  15. #15
    Charlie's Avatar
    Charlie is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kerr County Texas
    Posts
    2,838
    Just get one (or more) of each and decide for yourself!!! Problem solved.

  16. #16
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Arizona, baby!
    Posts
    5,081
    Fun thread about this here: Autoloaders versus revolvers.

    * Reliability - Yes, it's still important. There's something to be said about "six for sure". A revolver will simply never fail to feed, eject or cycle. A failure to fire is fixed with a subsequent pull of the trigger. The only thing that stops it dead is a squib. Autos simply can't compete; the fact that the bullet is moved around within the gun means that while stripping, lifting and chambering each round, something can go wrong.
    I have seen several types of jams and malfunctions with revolvers:

    1. Case stuck under the extractor star on a too-hasty speed reload.
    2. Bullets backing out of cases under heavy recoil and preventing the cylinder from turning.
    3. Primer-only rounds causing a bullet to get stuck in the barrel (and a revolver doesn't let you know when this happens, unlike an auto).
    4. Broken main/hammer spring that rendered the revolver totally inoperative.
    5. Cylinder release latches fall off.
    6. Ejector rods come unscrewed and prevent the cylinder from opening/closing.
    7. Went "out of time," giving off-center hits and unreliable ignition.

    Some of these have happened to my revolvers, others happened to different shooters in matches or on the range when I was present.

    My Glocks are easily as reliable as any revolver I've owned.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  17. #17
    Charlie's Avatar
    Charlie is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kerr County Texas
    Posts
    2,838
    All guns are unreliable except Glock! Right Mike?

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Lexington
    Posts
    1,083
    The true question to ask yourself is cop versus cowboy. A cop carries an autoloader, and a cowboy carries a revolver. You pick.





    Just kidding. I'm not big into revolvers unless they're large enough to tame recoil, hold onto during recoil, and can be openly carried. This translates into protection against large animals in the woods, not humans in populated areas. But that's just my opinion.

  19. #19
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Arizona, baby!
    Posts
    5,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie View Post
    All guns are unreliable except Glock! Right Mike?
    Nope. I only mentioned Glock because they are the guns I carry and shoot the most, and the ones I can best compare to other guns I've owned.

    I was fully satisfied with the Beretta 92 I carried in Afghanistan, in terms of reliability. SIGs and HKs have also been put through enough wringers to know they are superbly reliable. The Springfield XD has shown itself to be very reliable thus far. I owned a Kahr K9 that was 100% reliable, and my KelTec P3AT and P32 have both been simply excellent.

    While I am something of a Glock partisan for ergonomic reasons, I recognize that there are many reliable modern autos out there...to the point where I consider the revolver's "edge" in reliability to largely be a myth. (Unless your name is Bill King...)

    I think in days past, when the autos available were old designs like the 1911 and Browning P35, there was some truth to the claim of greater revolver reliability. But I have seen enough revolvers choke, and enough reliable modern autos, that I don't think it's even a consideration with the newer auto designs.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  20. #20
    Old Padawan's Avatar
    Old Padawan is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    818
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    While I am something of a Glock partisan for ergonomic reasons, I recognize that there are many reliable modern autos out there...to the point where I consider the revolver's "edge" in reliability to largely be a myth. (Unless your name is Bill King...)
    This is true, but I can clear a malfunction REALLY FAST!!

    The best gun to have in a gunfight is the one you have with you when it is needed. By buying a gun that is comfortable to carry, easy for you to conceal and one you like to shoot you will increase the chance that you will have it with you when you need it.
    Like many things in life, people tend to overthink this problem.
    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it." -Mark Twain

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

best ccw revolver
,

ccw pistol or revolver

,
ccw pistol vs revolver
,
pistol or revolver for ccw
,

pistol vs revolver

,
pistol vs revolver for ccw
,

revolver or pistol for ccw

,
revolver or pistol for concealed carry
,

revolver vs pistol ccw

,
revolver vs pistol concealed carry
,

revolver vs pistol for ccw

,

revolver vs pistol reliability

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1