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  1. #1
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    Question Technique for two eyes open pistol shooting?

    Can someone out there, for the benefit of many of us, explain the technique and practice drills to achieve proficiency in keeping both eyes open while shooting.

    And for once I ask that all the bull$hit and smarta$$ answers be silenced.

    This is a very important topic that many folks would be interested in. I personally feel that it is of utmost importance in a self defense situation. I'd feel a lot better knowing in what proximity my projectile is traveling. Last thing anyone wants is to injure an innocent bystander.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Bisley's Avatar
    Bisley is offline Senior Member
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    It's not really a technique that has to be learned. It's more like trying to learn not to flinch. If you just try not to squint, and keep your proper sight picture, your dominant eye is going to line up the sights, naturally. It's just a matter of relaxing your face, and doing what you always do, otherwise. You can start out by looking over the sights with both eyes open, then settling down into your sight picture.

  3. #3
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by plentyofpaws View Post
    And for once I ask that all the bull$hit and smarta$$ answers be silenced.


    You get an answer you don't like, ignore it.

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    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post


    You get an answer you don't like, ignore it.
    I did!

  5. #5
    James NM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plentyofpaws View Post
    ...And for once I ask that all the bull$hit and smarta$$ answers be silenced...
    Well, you just shut me up.



    Actually, both eyes open pistol shooting (without a scope) requires a deliberate focus on the front sight. Your dominant eye should take over and facilitate lining up the sights on the target. The rear sights and your target will necessarily be blurry or out of focus. It takes a lot (and I mean alot - for me anyway) of practice to become proficient.

    I don't have any specific drills for you. Just practice single and double shots to a target. And then engage multiple targets, focusing on the front sight, until you become proficient.

    But I still wish I could have been a smart azz.

  6. #6
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    Actually, my instructor for my ccw class spent some time covering this topic, and had some good information on this.

    He first showed us how to identify your dominant eye (which a majority of people will already know)
    Then he explained that shooting with both eyes open gives you better depth perception and awareness. Shooting with only one eye open decreases such perception and narrows your field of vision. He told us that if we are comfortable with shooting coming into the class that he was not going to ask us to change the way we shoot. I have traditionally shot with one eye open (mostly rifles and shotguns) but I wanted to try with both eyes open. To my surprise, it was relatively easy to adjust to that shooting style, and i have stayed with it. You really have a much larger field of view, and it is just as easy for me to obtain my target. I hope this is what you are looking for. If you need to know how to identify your dominant eye, let me know and i can sum it up easily for you.

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    Thanks to all!

    James NM: So basically what you're saying is the rear sight does not really come into play. Look over the rear sight and line up the front site on your target. Sorta like Kentucky Windage!

    I can see where a lot of rounds need to go down range to get comfortable with the two eyes open technique.

    I am going to give it a go round and see what happens. My concern is that in a SD situation you are going to be too busy finding your gun, pulling it out of the holster, trying not to soil your drawers and then aim and fire!!!! To me a point and shoot technique would be much smarter and quicker. Not gonna keep me from soiling my drawers, but hopefully I'll be able to keep the BG at bay!

    Thanks again. And I apologize for the censorship

  8. #8
    James NM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plentyofpaws View Post
    ... And I apologize for the censorship
    OK. I Take that to mean we are free to respond as we wish. That's good, because I have been working on a shooting technique where I shoot with both eyes closed. I call it "Be the Bullet".




    So basically what you're saying is the rear sight does not really come into play
    No, you still have to use your rear sights. But when you focus on the front sight, the target and the rear sights will be out of focus. I guess it's a defect in the design of the human eye. Maybe the new improved model will address that issue. You still have to align the front and rear sights with the target, but you focus on the front sight and this will cause the rear sights and the target to be blurry or out of focus. It's kinda like using you peripheral vision to see the target and rear sights, even though all three objects are in the same line of vision.

    The best way to try it is with an empty weapon and target acquisition. You don't even have to dry fire. Just point the gun at a "target", both eyes open, and focus on the front sights as you align both sights and the target. Move the gun to acquire a new "target".

    For me it was a difficult skill to learn and is highly perishable.

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    LOL, I like that BTB approach!

    Okay got it. And yes I can surely understand why it is highly perishable. But I believe all "point and shoot" techniques are perishable. Although "two eyes open" isn't really considered point and shoot, it falls into the category of "a lot of practice makes you less than perfect."

    Thanks for the good advice.

  10. #10
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    "Be The Bullet"

    I am working on the two eye but it does take time. For me, it works better if I practice with just one gun so that I get used to that sight pattern for this technique. At least one at a time anyways. It is difficult to keep both eyes open when you are used to shooting with one eye. It reminds me of a saying, "good habits are hard to make and bad habits are hard to break", not that this is a bad habbit.
    Last edited by dosborn; 09-04-2009 at 09:13 PM. Reason: it's hard to think ant type at the same time

  11. #11
    James NM's Avatar
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    OK, because of the presence of some pinheads on the forum, I guess I need to have a disclaimer on my "Be the Bullet" technique. Without this disclaimer, these idiots will claim that I advocate shooting a pistol with both eyes closed. While a sane, rational person would know that this statement was made in jest, these people are neither sane nor rational. This lack of common sense might be due to extenuating circumstances, as I believe their affliction is caused by a lack of oxygen. When your head gets far enough up your butt, oxygen has a hard time reaching your brain.

    My "Be the Bullet" technique is actually a reference to the Chevy Chase character in Caddyshack, who uses a na na na na na na na na na na na na na na na "Be the Ball" technique while golfing, where he becomes one with the ball to get it to go where he wants it to go. My "Be the Bullet" technique was a childish and irresponsible attempt at humor.

    So before anyone tries shooting with both eyes closed, please read the Five rules of gun safety:

    Jeff Cooper's Rules of Gun Safety



    RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

    RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

    RULE III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

    RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

    There are no exceptions. Do not pretend that this is true. Some people and organizations take this rule and weaken it;e.g. "Treat all guns as if they were loaded." Unfortunately, the "as if" compromises the directness of the statement by implying that they are unloaded, but we will treat them as though they are loaded. No good! Safety rules must be worded forcefully so that they are never treated lightly or reduced to partial compliance.

    All guns are always loaded - period!

    This must be your mind-set. If someone hands you a firearm and says, "Don't worry, it's not loaded," you do not dare believe him. You need not be impolite, but check it yourself. Remember, there are no accidents, only negligent acts. Check it. Do not let yourself fall prey to a situation where you might feel compelled to squeal, "I didn't know it was loaded!"



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

    Conspicuously and continuously violated, especially with pistols, Rule II applies whether you are involved in range practice, daily carry, or examination. If the weapon is assembled and in someone's hands, it is capable of being discharged. A firearm holstered properly, lying on a table, or placed in a scabbard is of no danger to anyone. Only when handled is there a need for concern. This rule applies to fighting as well as to daily handling. If you are not willing to take a human life, do not cover a person with the muzzle. This rule also applies to your own person. Do not allow the muzzle to cover your extremities, e.g. using both hands to reholster the pistol. This practice is unsound, both procedurally and tactically. You may need a free hand for something important. Proper holster design should provide for one-handed holstering, so avoid holsters which collapse after withdrawing the pistol. (Note: It is dangerous to push the muzzle against the inside edge of the holster nearest the body to "open" it since this results in your pointing the pistol at your midsection.) Dry-practice in the home is a worthwhile habit and it will result in more deeply programmed reflexes. Most of the reflexes involved in the Modern Technique do not require that a shot be fired. Particular procedures for dry-firing in the home will be covered later. Let it suffice for now that you do not dry-fire using a "target" that you wish not to see destroyed. (Recall RULE I as well.)





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Rule III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

    Rule III is violated most anytime the uneducated person handles a firearm. Whether on TV, in the theaters, or at the range, people seem fascinated with having their finger on the trigger. Never stand or walk around with your finger on the trigger. It is unprofessional, dangerous, and, perhaps most damaging to the psyche, it is klutzy looking. Never fire a shot unless the sights are superimposed on the target and you have made a conscious decision to fire. Firing an unaligned pistol in a fight gains nothing. If you believe that the defensive pistol is only an intimidation tool - not something to be used - carry blanks, or better yet, reevaluate having one around. If you are going to launch a projectile, it had best be directed purposely. Danger abounds if you allow your finger to dawdle inside the trigger guard. As soon as the sights leave the target, the trigger-finger leaves the trigger and straightens alongside the frame. Since the hand normally prefers to work as a unit - as in grasping - separating the function of the trigger-finger from the rest of the hand takes effort. The five-finger grasp is a deeply programmed reflex. Under sufficient stress, and with the finger already placed on the trigger, an unexpected movement, misstep or surprise could result in a negligent discharge. Speed cannot be gained from such a premature placement of the trigger-finger. Bringing the sights to bear on the target, whether from the holster or the Guard Position, takes more time than that required for moving the trigger finger an inch or so to the trigger.





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET

    Know what it is, what is in line with it, and what is behind it. Never shoot at anything you have not positively identified. Be aware of your surroundings, whether on the range or in a fight. Do not assume anything. Know what you are doing.



    SUMMARY:

    Make these rules a part of your character. Never compromise them. Improper gunhandling results from ignorance and improper role modeling, such as handling your gun like your favorite actor does. Education can cure this. You can make a difference by following these gunhandling rules and insisting that those around you do the same. Set the example. Who knows what tragedies you, or someone you influence, may prevent?

    Excerpted from: The Modern Technique of the Pistol, by Greg Morrison, Gunsite Press, Paulden, Arizona, ISBN 0-9621342-3-6, Library of Congress Number 91-72644, $40

    For those who can't count, the above quote only lists Four rules of gun safety. That's because Jeff Cooper, as brilliant as he was, did not/could not forsee the coming infection of the PC crowd. If he had, he surely would have added:

    RULE V: DO NOT SHOOT WITH BOTH EYES CLOSED - YOU PINHEAD!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by James NM View Post
    Well, you just shut me up.



    Actually, both eyes open pistol shooting (without a scope) requires a deliberate focus on the front sight. Your dominant eye should take over and facilitate lining up the sights on the target. The rear sights and your target will necessarily be blurry or out of focus. It takes a lot (and I mean alot - for me anyway) of practice to become proficient.

    I don't have any specific drills for you. Just practice single and double shots to a target. And then engage multiple targets, focusing on the front sight, until you become proficient....................
    Thanks for the tips

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