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Thread: XDM 40 vs. 9mm

  1. #1
    Jimmy Paperboy's Avatar
    Jimmy Paperboy is offline Junior Member
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    XDM 40 vs. 9mm

    Hey all I am new to the forums and looking to buy my first handgun. I have shot the xd 9 and 40 but not the xdm. I am certain that I want an XDM but not sure whether to go with the 9mm or the 40. Just seeing what you guys think and any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    ROBINPA's Avatar
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    You didnt say what the intended use will be , IMO , the 9mm will be a little more economical to shoot than the 40sw , but in my opinion the 40sw is a much better personal defence round. Ya could buy one of each ,than you know you made the right choice.

  3. #3
    Jimmy Paperboy's Avatar
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    Haha if I could buy both I would in a heartbeat. I am looking for a good gun for defence. I guess my main concern is the recoil. Is the difference in recoil neglible between the two?

  4. #4
    Todd is offline Banned
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    First gun? 9mm. It's cheaper than the .40 ( = more range time) and not as "snappy" as the .40. It's shot placement that counts in the defensive world, not the potential damage a round can do. Loaded with a premium HP defensive round, the 9mm is perfectly adequate to do a defense job if you can get your shots COM.

  5. #5
    PhilR. is offline Member
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    Agree w/Todd -- the 9mm is anywhere from mildly to greatly cheaper to shoot, depending on what brand you buy. For example, 9mm Blazer Brass is $8.97 per box at the local Wally World zoo, but Federal .40 is $14.97. Sure it's possible that spending $6 more per box in order to make holes in paper that are 0.02" larger is fine for you, but that extra money really adds up over time.

    Spending less means shooting more, and shooting more means better accuracy (and more fun). Although the .40 may posess more kenetic energy than the 9mm, that extra energy means nothing if you can't put the bullet where it needs to be.

    At any rate, nothing says that you can't buy one, and then the other later on. Odds are that sooner or later, you are going to get another handgun anyway.....

  6. #6
    Jimmy Paperboy's Avatar
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    Very good point. I need to make sure to put in the range time to get used to the gun and get my accuracy down. I do appreciate all of the input and any additional would be welcomed.

  7. #7
    gdbrown56 is offline Junior Member
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    Buy the XDM 40 and then you can buy a 9mm conversion barrel. That's what I did and now I have the best of both worlds. If I just want target practice I load my conversion barrel and shoot 9mm at the range. Then I clean the gun and put the .40 barrel back in load it with hollow points and I've got my home defense weapon ready for action.

  8. #8
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdbrown56 View Post
    Buy the XDM 40 and then you can buy a 9mm conversion barrel. That's what I did and now I have the best of both worlds. If I just want target practice I load my conversion barrel and shoot 9mm at the range. Then I clean the gun and put the .40 barrel back in load it with hollow points and I've got my home defense weapon ready for action.
    The only problem with that is if you spend all your time practicing with 9mm and then swap to the .40 for defense, you're not really practicing with what you're going to use in a defensive situation. It's like people who have a .357 for defense but only shoot .38 at the range. The assumption that some people have that because it's the same gun, everything is going to shoot the same is wrong. The calibers have different characteristics and you need to be proficient with the round you're going to use for defense, not just the platform.. There can't be any surprises when you pull the trigger. You're legally responsible for every bullet that comes out of your gun. You need to know that every time you pull the trigger, you are going to hit the target. Long story short, you need to practice with the exact set-up you're going to have for defense, not something similar.

  9. #9
    chris441's Avatar
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    I shot both the XD40 and XD9 and also the XDM9 before buying and in the end I bought the XD9. I didn't feel for my purposes the the extra money was needed to be spent on the M and I got a good deal thorugh Buds for the XD9 $419 shipped. I also choose the 9mm due to ammunition cost. My next gun will be a 40 or 45 and smaller. I didn't shoot any different with the XD vs XDM. The XDM just felt a little bulkier to me then the XD.

  10. #10
    digitalexplr is offline Junior Member
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    I've got a 9sc and a 40 service. I don't find that big a difference, if any, in recoil between the 9 and 40. Also, 40 ammo seems easier go find lately and is not significantly higher in cost than 9.

    I suspect you will be more than satisfied which ever way you choose to go. If you can, try to shoot both 9 and 40 before making your choice. Get the one you shoot the best.

  11. #11
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    Go with the regular XD if your not going to the range all the time to try to cluster shots closer and closer. In fact so close there touching,then all bullseyes,then one through the same hole as the one before... Thats what the XDM is designed for.
    Go with a subcompact for concealment. Even if its service model,go regular XD as the M is basically set for easier accurracy on the range...

  12. #12
    Freedom1911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    First gun? 9mm. It's cheaper than the .40 ( = more range time) and not as "snappy" as the .40. It's shot placement that counts in the defensive world, not the potential damage a round can do. Loaded with a premium HP defensive round, the 9mm is perfectly adequate to do a defense job if you can get your shots COM.
    WOW!!.
    Please don't take this the wrong way.
    I see many forums, and very few have mods that have their common sense hat on when it comes to this subject.
    Most will blather on about the 40SW and its one shot stop ability over the 9mm, on and on ad nauseum.
    It is good to see a mod on a forum that recognises that 9mm defensive rounds are effective and that shot placement is more important than caliber.

    After all. What good is the 40SW round if it has to much kick for you to hit the broad side of a barn with it.
    My sister had to shoot for a couple years befor she could hit anything with a 9mm.
    40SW is completely out of the question for her.
    She is very comfortable with a 380, and she understands that it is better even to hit your attacker several times with 22s, than it is to miss them with the 40 or even 9mm if it is to much.

  13. #13
    Rys2k8Altima is offline Junior Member
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    Im actually currently debating on these same two guns.

  14. #14
    mrwizardly is offline Junior Member
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    I have no desire to get a 40, too much kick because of the high pressure it builds up upon firing. The 9mm builds up similar pressure, but has less kick because of it's size. If I wanted a larger round, I would get a 45acp, which has half the pressure build up when fired. That's probably one of many reasons you see so much 40 ammo available, and not so much 9 or 45. Go with the 9mm.
    MW

  15. #15
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    I was recently at a firing range and was standing next to a couple[man and woman] who were shooting a pistol. I could not help but notice how well the lady was shooting the pistol also and I asked them what they were shooting.It was a Sig Sauer in 357 SIG and the 5 ft 2 " 120 lb lady had no problem shooting the 357SIG and keeping the rounds in the black at 15 yards.This was impressive and started my quest to research the 357 SIG cartridge because I was considering a 40 S&W.
    I wound up choosing the XD Tactical in 357SIG and like the pistol very much. I recommend anyone considering a 40 S&W to also look at the 357 SIG.

  16. #16
    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    The only problem with that is if you spend all your time practicing with 9mm and then swap to the .40 for defense, you're not really practicing with what you're going to use in a defensive situation. It's like people who have a .357 for defense but only shoot .38 at the range. The assumption that some people have that because it's the same gun, everything is going to shoot the same is wrong. The calibers have different characteristics and you need to be proficient with the round you're going to use for defense, not just the platform.. There can't be any surprises when you pull the trigger. You're legally responsible for every bullet that comes out of your gun. You need to know that every time you pull the trigger, you are going to hit the target. Long story short, you need to practice with the exact set-up you're going to have for defense, not something similar.
    +1
    The difference between the 9mm and .40 especially in a poly frame weapon is pretty easy to tell. It's best to practice with loads that are as similar to what you intend to carry as possible. Other weapons/calibers are great for poking holes or even if you want to just expand the collection but if you spend all day shooing 9mm then carry a 40 that first snappy recoil is going to be a pretty big surprise. And if a bad situation (God forbid) ever does show itself that is the wrong time to be dealing with surprises. I don't like light loaded range ammo just for that reason.

    By all means have both if that's what you are wanting to do but if the intention is to carry one over the other then practice with the one. A person can cary more than one caliber but then it pays to be equally as proficient with both calibers.

  17. #17
    Varmonter's Avatar
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    So if this is the premise for buying 9 over 40 than why not buy 45.
    I am considering getting the xd sub 40 .My EDC is a p-239 sig right now in .40 and I don't mind the snap at all.
    I also shoot a Caspian commander 1911 in 45 and find that more pleasurable and easier than the smaller
    .40.It's a heavier gun..Either way i have no issues shooting either.My point(yes there is one) is
    I think if you start with a small caliber like a 380 or a 9mm and then step up to 40 or 45 you will notice a difference.Absolutely.. they are more powerful rounds.. But as long as you don't buy a mouse gun,,
    You should have no issues shooting any of them..Just practice with what you carry. My Granddaughter shoots a 9mm and she's 12. I mean these are not hard rounds to handle.Not like a 500 sw or a 460 ruger or even a 454 cas or 44 mag . These are wimpy rounds compared to real big bore stuff. Learn to reload and ammo cost won't be as big of a deal.

  18. #18
    terryger is offline Junior Member
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    recoil is a personal perception issue. it has nothing the do with macho.

    the .40 s&w and .357 sig are both in what is reffered to as "crisp" recoil parameters.

    the 9 and 45 are less so.

    if shooting a .40 made you "jump" so will a .357 sig.

    the 9 and 45 are less feltr recoil becasue of the size of the projectile and the load of powder pushing it.

    that is why the .40 and .357 sig are called "high pressure" loads.

    all are fine for personal defense as long as the shot is placed correctly.

    shoot the one that feels best to you.

    i shoot both .40 and .357 sig for ccw but recoil has never been an issue with me. my brtoher on the other hand does not care for either and shoots the 9. my wife shoots a .45 kimber,

    see, it has nothing to do with man/woman or macho as my brother is physically much bigger than i and my wife is tiny.

  19. #19
    mrwizardly is offline Junior Member
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    I like Todd's response, it makes sense. I would go with the 9mm for a 1st gun. If you must have a higher caliber for your first gun, get a 45acp. Plain and simple, no need for extra bs words.
    MW

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