View Poll Results: Which would you get?

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  • SW 637

    2 13.33%
  • SW 642

    10 66.67%
  • SW 442

    3 20.00%
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  1. #1
    AJAnello78 is offline Junior Member
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    New to J Frames, Need Advice

    Hey guys, so im looking into SW J Frame Revolvers. i really like the look of the 637 however, A lot of people from multiple place, here and the range etc. Said that i shoiuld look into the 642. My purpose is to have a loaded gun in the house and obviously home defense. I have a Sig P226 that i just got but i would like to have a nice little revolver in my collection also. Please shed some light on me between the two besides DA and SA. Is the 637 with the hammer open and sticking out of the frame a problem such as flint? i know very little about the J Frames. All i know if that 637 is DA/SA unlike the 642 which is only DA since the hammer is cover inside the fame. Sorry if i sound like a newby. Just want to get the right gun for the right purposes.

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  3. #2
    denner's Avatar
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    I prefer the 637. The only reason in my opinion to opt for the DAO 642 is if your looking for deep concealment under clothing. I've carried the 637 in a IWB holster and I have not had any issues drawing the pistol and having it snag up on anything. I also prefer the traditional look of the 637 and having the option to shoot in SA. If for home defense I'd opt for the 637 and no issue with lint in my experience. I've heard the 638 w/ the shrouded hammer has had some complaints w/ lint, but I don't know because I've never owned one.

  4. #3
    KampfJaeger's Avatar
    KampfJaeger is offline Junior Member
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    I'm X2 on that comment.

  5. #4
    Cait43's Avatar
    Cait43 is online now Member
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    There is no one right answer..... Weapon choice is really a personal one..... What I like might not be to your liking.... There are various factors to consider when choosing a weapon.....

    Best advise is if you can get the opportunity to handle and fire the different weapons you are interested in..... That is a huge plus....... Good luck..........

  6. #5
    AJAnello78 is offline Junior Member
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    even with the flint issues?

  7. #6
    denner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJAnello78 View Post
    even with the flint issues?
    What flint issues? You mean lint? No lint or flint issues w/ the 637, promise. If the guys from the multiple places and at your range are telling you the 637 has lint or flint issues tell them they know not what they speak. Other than what I stated above about the 642 the reasoning I suppose is that in a self defense situation it is better to opt for the DA pull in most all scenarios instead of cocking the hammer in a self defense situation, so in that line of thought why do you need a SA. But I enjoy shooting the SA as it can be very accurate especially for those longer shots. As cait 43said it's a personal choice, you asked for advice and I gave you mine concerning a firearm I own and really like. Be safe and good shooting.

  8. #7
    Cait43's Avatar
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  9. #8
    denner's Avatar
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  10. #9
    Cait43's Avatar
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  11. #10
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Short-barrel, double-action revolvers are very difficult to shoot accurately, effectively, and well. They are not beginners' guns.
    Before buying a snubbie, you need to know how to shoot a pistol really well, and you need a lot of practice with trigger control.

    We have a S&W Airweight Bodyguard (shrouded-hammer J-frame). When carried in a proper belt holster, there are no lint problems. However, pocket carry, even in a holster, is quite another kettle of fish.

    My wife likes the S&W snubbie we own as a carry piece, but she can't shoot it comfortably because its recoil makes it twist in her hand. Therefore, practice with it is an "ain't gonna happen." Instead, she prefers to shoot her Kel-Tec P3AT. She's quite good with it, so that's what she carries.
    To be truthful, the 638 twists in my hand too. I can hit with it, but I'd rather shoot my pocket-size .45 semi-auto, or the medium-size .380 pistol I normally carry.

  12. #11
    Cait43's Avatar
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    Charter Arms 9mm Pitbull Revolver
    No moon clips needed
    79920 9 mm Pitbull Rimless Revolver

    Charter Arms .40 caliber Pitbull Revolver
    No moon clips needed
    http://www.charterfirearms.com/produ...bull_74020.asp

  13. #12
    shaolin's Avatar
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    I own both of these snub nose pistols and I like the 637 better.

  14. #13
    rex
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    About the only benefit from a shrouded hammer revolver is you can shoot it from a pocket (like your jacket,not pants pocket) if need be and the gun will go off with no chance of the pocket or lining material wrapping in between the hammer and frame causing no boom.This is normally a carry where you don't have it in a pocket holster and are forced or stumble into a bad area.When the signs dictate it you just put your hands in your pockets and hold the gun just in case.If you do need to use it,the preferred way is push your hand,gun and jacket out forward some to get the cylinder gap in front of you,if you shoot your jacket is junk from the flames and spatter coming from the cylinder gap,but a jacket is the least of your worries if you had to do it.You could pull the trigger with the gun back at your body,but I wouldn't if I didn't have to.

    That is one drawback to revolvers,that damn cylinder gap.Shooting an auto at night isn't bad if the powder has some flash suppressant in it,it will actually illuminate your target better for you in real low light.With the revolver,that blast coming out of the gap can be freakin blinding,especially when you hit the 357mag.I used to hate night qualifying with the revolver because I was blind after a cylinder full.The 38 reloads weren't too bad,but the full house 357s were brutal on the eyes.If you've ever had your head hit hard enough to have a whiteout,bingo every shot.

  15. #14
    flugzeug is offline Junior Member
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    I can't vote, I carry a stainless model 60. My wife on the other hand carries the 642.

  16. #15
    AJAnello78 is offline Junior Member
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    thanks for the advice. im still unsure what to get between the two.

  17. #16
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    If you are buying it strictly for HD then go for the Model 60 in stainless. It is heavier and has a tad longer barrel. Both of these lead to a better gun for shooting and more accuracy.

  18. #17
    AJAnello78 is offline Junior Member
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    if i get a model 60, could i put Square grips on them instead of the rounded grips?

  19. #18
    rex
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    If you mean as in the gripfame being square instead of round butt,yes but you'll have to look.You just can't go the other way.Last I knew years ago there were only a handful of them around but that may have changed.

  20. #19
    desertman is offline Member
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    I have four J frames, models 642, 442, 49, and 640, the finish on the 642 is God awful! Started coming off after about 3 months, not just wearing off, but flaking off, I swear they must have used nail polish. The 442 is holding up much better. S&W offered to re-finish it (642) but it would be the same crappy finish that is on it, so I'll probably do it myself with Dura Coat. Overall I prefer the model 640 .357 all stainless, finish certainly is not an issue, it will accept all .38 Specials including .357 Magnum which I don't recommend using it with. Because of it's extra weight it is quite manageable with .38+P and having been made to accept the .357 you can practice a lot with .38's without fear of wearing out the gun. The Model 49 Bodyguard with it's shrouded hammer or any other model of that design attracts a ton of lint and dirt and has to be cleaned more often as the crud gets in between the hammer and frame giving it a gritty feel as you squeeze the trigger. Enclosed hammers are much better, exposed hammers will also attract a lot of grit, as these revolvers are often carried in your pocket. Remember, these guns are not designed for target practice, so exposed hammers serve no real purpose when used for self defense as these weapons were originally designed. Round grips with a Tyler "T" adapter is a good way to go for maximum concealment and shoot ability, rather than a square butt. Again they're not target pistols. Hope this helps.

  21. #20
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    I've had a 642 for two and 1/2 years. I don't like "the look" compared to the exposed hammer guns.
    But, I bought it for when I need deep concealment functionality, not for its looks. I have CT Laser grips on it.
    It is not my primary CCW EDC. And, unlike a post above, my 642's finish is still "perfect". After a LOT of ammo.

    I find I need to practice quite often with the J-frame to be "reasonably proficient". Just as the same practice
    is needed for my SIG P290 semi-auto. What they have in common is they both weigh 15 oz. unloaded.

    Many other guns I have such as 9mm Beretta 92 or .45 Long Colt single actions I can shoot pretty well
    after a "layoff". The only thing they have in common is "larger size and more weight" than the CCW guns.
    Just another example of not being able to violate the laws of physics.

    P.S.
    My Ruger Alaskan 2 1/2" barrel "super snubby" in .454 Casull with full power loads at night has some
    REALLY impressive barrel and cylinder gap flashes. Kinda like being hit with a strobe. And, you REALLY
    need to make sure where your off-hand is placed. So far, I haven't made a "cylinder gap mistake".

  22. #21
    AJAnello78 is offline Junior Member
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    yea i still dont know what i will end up getting, all i know is that i want to get a nice revolver by the time my permit expires.

  23. #22
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Short-barrel, double-action revolvers are very difficult to shoot accurately, effectively, and well. They are not beginners' guns. Before buying a snubbie, you need to know how to shoot a pistol really well, and you need a lot of practice with trigger control.

    We have a S&W Airweight Bodyguard (shrouded-hammer J-frame). When carried in a proper belt holster, there are no lint problems. However, pocket carry, even in a holster, is quite another kettle of fish.

    My wife likes the S&W snubbie we own as a carry piece, but she can't shoot it comfortably because its recoil makes it twist in her hand. Therefore, practice with it is an "ain't gonna happen." Instead, she prefers to shoot her Kel-Tec P3AT. She's quite good with it, so that's what she carries. To be truthful, the 638 twists in my hand too. I can hit with it, but I'd rather shoot my pocket-size .45 semi-auto, or the medium-size .380 pistol I normally carry.
    I've been handling pistols for more than 50 years; and I completely share in the above opinion! Did someone say, 'home defense'? You don't do home defense with what is essentially a toe-to-toe, 'belly gun'. All of the revolvers mentioned are SECONDARY, and NOT PRIMARY self-defense handguns.

    For many years, now, I've repeatedly posted that a (self-defense) handgun should never be little better than a, 'personal security pacifier'. On occasion someone will come back with the sage advice, 'The first rule of gunfighting is to have a gun.' That remark is, however, pseudointellectual internet gun forum folderol. As far as I'm concerned (and, yes, I've been there) the latter remark is the intellectual equivalent of, 'bringing a knife to a gunfight!'

    Why? Because if, 'push should ever come to shove' you, more than likely, aren't going to make it! I own, and have owned, many small handguns, but none were ever used as a primary carry, and NEVER for, 'home defense'. The reason for the single action exposed hammer is to help the shooter to have more control over longer shots - Which in the case of ALL the above mentioned revolvers effectively amounts to, no more than, 10 yards; and only then when one of these small, 'belly guns' is used in the hands of a knowledgeable, and heavily practiced shooter.

    (Hell, every time I go to the range I watch people struggle to just keep their shots, 'on paper' with these little handguns; and, I can tell you from hard experience that a one hour practice session with one of these, 'little poppers' can be really hard on your hands - especially if you happen to be an older pistolero like me!)

  24. #23
    denner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Doctor View Post
    I've been handling pistols for more than 50 years; and I completely share in the above opinion! Did someone say, 'home defense'? You don't do home defense with what is essentially a toe-to-toe, 'belly gun'. All of the revolvers mentioned are SECONDARY, and NOT PRIMARY self-defense handguns.

    For many years, now, I've repeatedly posted that a (self-defense) handgun should never be little better than a, 'personal security pacifier'. On occasion someone will come back with the sage advice, 'The first rule of gunfighting is to have a gun.' That remark is, however, pseudointellectual internet gun forum folderol. As far as I'm concerned (and, yes, I've been there) the latter remark is the intellectual equivalent of, 'bringing a knife to a gunfight!'

    Why? Because if, 'push should ever come to shove' you, more than likely, aren't going to make it! I own, and have owned, many small handguns, but none were ever used as a primary carry, and NEVER for, 'home defense'. The reason for the single action exposed hammer is to help the shooter to have more control over longer shots - Which in the case of ALL the above mentioned revolvers effectively amounts to, no more than, 10 yards; and only then when one of these small, 'belly guns' is used in the hands of a knowledgeable, and heavily practiced shooter.

    (Hell, every time I go to the range I watch people struggle to just keep their shots, 'on paper' with these little handguns; and, I can tell you from hard experience that a one hour practice session with one of these, 'little poppers' can be really hard on your hands - especially if you happen to be an older pistolero like me!)

    While I agree to some extent, I think we are being a little harsh on the J-Frame. First and foremost put a pachmeyer grip on your J-frame would be my advice. It lengthens the grip and covers the back strap substantially reducing muzzle flip and recoil. It gives you cushioning w/ alot to hold on to and fully covers the the back strap(a biggie). If recoil is a problem stay with .38 special and forego +p, but many +p loads are much tamer than others. It's a matter of finding a load that you can handle comfortably as the recoil in 38 special and +p variants are far from being created equal. Some 38 special +p will really jolt you, some are much milder and even pleasant to shoot. I've shot some J-frames that I couldn't hit the broad side of the barn with. However, my mothers latest acquisition a Model 37 shoots sub moa at 15 yards and beyond, a very accurate little piece. If my 70+ year old mother can handle it many should be able to. Capacity and reloading is not optimal, but if you live in NY you're limited to 7 rounds anyway.

  25. #24
    Bisley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanP_from_AZ View Post
    I've had a 642 for two and 1/2 years. I don't like "the look" compared to the exposed hammer guns.
    But, I bought it for when I need deep concealment functionality, not for its looks. I have CT Laser grips on it.
    It is not my primary CCW EDC. And, unlike a post above, my 642's finish is still "perfect". After a LOT of ammo.
    This pretty well mirrors my own experience. Many hours of dry-fire, using the CT laser has improved my trigger control, across the board. I also like it that if I really want to bear down on the accuracy, and have time to do it, it is possible to 'stage' the trigger (for lack of a better term) and fire it in a similar way to single action. All in all, I find the 642 with CT laser grips to be very useful, although definitely not the 'ideal' personal protection weapon, for me.

  26. #25
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
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    I have several J-Frame S&W revolvers. Out of those, one is a model 642. Although I do prefer stainless steel revolvers, some are aluminum.

    The thing I like about the 642, is the ability to be able to stash it in almost anything I wear. I can stuff it in a jacket pocket, or I can tuck it into the rear pocket of my blue jeans. The fact that it is about as snag-free as you can get, only adds to the desirability of it's lightness. Between the two, it's a great carry gun.

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