Bought a Used S&W 586 4" Bbl...what do I check before I shoot it?

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    1. #1
      Junior Member
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      Bought a Used S&W 586 4" Bbl...what do I check before I shoot it?

      I know that this weapon hasn't been fired in ~15 years - my friend bought it and never used it.

      The cylinder rolls and everything seems to function properly when I dry fire it.

      I've checked the cylinder lockup and movement after I cocked the hammer and then rechecked after I squeezed
      (and held) the trigger.

      All in all the weapon seems solid...with the exception of some normal wear and tear.

      What other items should I check before I run some rounds through it?

      Thanks in advance,
      Sulphurboy

    2. #2
      Senior Member zhurdan's Avatar
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      Honestly... nothing. Now that you've bought it, it doesn't really do much good to ask what you should look for, does it? I mean, really... people should ask these questions prior to purchasing something, don't you think?

      As far as safety goes, cylinder lock up is probably the best thing you've already checked, but take a peek down the barrel (unloaded of course) and check for any bulges or signs of a stuck round or squib load.

      Always ask first, then buy. You might someday prevent yourself from buying a lemon.

    3. #3
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      i see

      i had already worked the action and checked the lockup and did a fairly thorough job of inspecting the barrel and cylinder chambers...

      i got it for a very good price so i already knew i could replace all the internals and still have paid much less than market price...

    4. #4
      Senior Member zhurdan's Avatar
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      Wow... you took that wrong.

      Wasn't insulting you. Please try to remember that you're not the only one reading stuff on this site. So, by my saying that people should ask first before buying, I was answering your question by point out looking at the barrel AND trying to help other people out by trying to get them to ask questions first.

      I even commended you for checking the cylinder lock up. The only other thing that I'd worry too much about, I pointed out as being the barrel.

      I'm not entirely sure where you thought I was busting your balls. I could care less about post count.

      Cylinder gap can also present problems, but none that will totally fubar the pistol unless it's just huge. It can be fixed by a competent gunsmith if it's too large. Not knowing your experience level with revolvers, make sure to keep your digits away from the cylinder gap so you don't lose them. (No, I'm not calling into question your knowledge, I just don't know how much you may know)

    5. #5
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      ahh sheet...

      Sorry...

      Yep I took that all wrong. I was mistaken and overreacted...

      I'm going to edit my post to hide my over reaction...but now see that my faux pas will live on in the quote...sheesh...i can't even foul up correctly today...

      But above all else, thanks for your responses - i'm not an amateur, but I'm no pistolsmith either and I was genuinely interested in hearing what else I could or should check before I burned some gunpowder in this thing.

    6. #6
      Senior Member zhurdan's Avatar
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      Done.

    7. #7
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      Quote Originally Posted by zhurdan View Post
      Honestly... nothing. Now that you've bought it, it doesn't really do much good to ask what you should look for, does it? I mean, really... people should ask these questions prior to purchasing something, don't you think?

      As far as safety goes, cylinder lock up is probably the best thing you've already checked, but take a peek down the barrel (unloaded of course) and check for any bulges or signs of a stuck round or squib load.

      Always ask first, then buy. You might someday prevent yourself from buying a lemon.
      i am also looking at a used revolver and wanting to ask questions. who do you ask? the seller?

      can you explain cylinder lock up in a simple e-mail?

      and what is a "squib load"

      inquiring minds....

      john

    8. #8
      Member HGF Gold Member
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      Wink

      I suggest you take it to an expert gunsmith, and let him do all the looking and measuring and such. Money well spent for piece of mind, especially if he finds a potential problem. I have bought my share of used handguns and have always had them checked by an expert (which I most definitely am not). Being a Smith and not real old you should be fine, but better safe than...you know!
      Good luck,
      Eli

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