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  1. #1
    smTm8qt is offline Junior Member
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    Question What IS this thing?

    Hello everyone. I'm sure someone here knows exactly what I have here, but it sure isn't me. I know it's worth a good chunk of change, but how much in this condition?



    On the left side it reads " SMITH & WESSON"
    On the right "32 AUTO. CTG" and "MADE IN U.S.A."
    On the top "SMITH & WESSON SPRINGFIELD MASS. U.S.A. PATENTED SEPT.15.1910.DEC.13.1910.FEB.28.1911.MAY.21.1916.J UNE.21.1921"

    Seems to be pretty rare, I can't find it anywhere. And the serial number is only 3 digits long. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you all for looking.

  2. #2
    Frank45's Avatar
    Frank45 is offline Member
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    I could not find anything on the Smith chapter, but it does have simularities to the Remington 51 .32 manufactored between 1918 and the late 20's and the Savage 1907 .32 with the 380 being introduced in 1913. Perhaps it's a proto-type that never made production? I dont know I got a pretty good publication and it's not there.

  3. #3
    bruce333's Avatar
    bruce333 is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    appears to be a very rare pistol

    Average Joe's Handgun Reviews

    Before we forge ahead with the 952 let’s examine its pedigree. Anyone who knows me knows that I like history; so sit back and relax while I bore you with some S&W trivia.
    Smith & Wesson began its foray into center fire semi-automatic pistol in 1913 with the model 35 which was produced from 1913 to 1921. There was a very strange grip safety located on the front strap and she fired the now obsolete .35 S&W cartridge. People did not rush to purchase the model 35 and Smith & Wesson dropped it from their catalogue after 8 years. Just about every handgun manufacturer produced a small .32 caliber pistol and the factory must have felt left out because 3 years later they debuted their own .32 ACP offering. This is an extremely handsome pistol but from what I can tell, this pistol did not even merit a name or model number designation. Supica/Nahas’ superb book, Standard Catalogue of Smith & Wesson 3rd Edition just refers to it as the Smith & Wesson .32 Semi-automatic Pistol. There are some excellent photos on collectorsfirearms.com (where I lifted the photo used here) and nowhere on this pistol is there a model designation. While this pistol remained in the S&W catalogue for 12 years only 957 were ever made. Compare this with the Colt Model 1903 Pocket Hammerless in .32 ACP in which was manufactured in boat loads and actually saw service in WWII (and probably WWI unofficially).
    Value depends on a lot of variables.

    One listed at the site mentioned above for $3500 http://collectorsfirearms.com/admin/...hp?itemID=4616
    Bruce, Life Member: NRA, NCRPA, GRNC, GOA

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    "I personally think we developed language because of our deep inner need to complain."--Jane Wagner
    "The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom."
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  4. #4
    Frank45's Avatar
    Frank45 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruce333 View Post
    appears to be a very rare pistol

    Average Joe's Handgun Reviews

    Value depends on a lot of variables.

    One listed at the site mentioned above for $3500 Collector's Firearms
    And if I may add to your thread, I was just at Gun Broker and I had to punch this into there computor...Smith & Wesson .32 it's only a mag, but he writes a little in the description.
    Last edited by Frank45; 07-17-2010 at 07:16 PM. Reason: Took out what bruce333 thread already had stated

  5. #5
    smTm8qt is offline Junior Member
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    Talking Wow

    Thank you so much everyone! I thought I would never find out anything about this gun. My goodness folks, glad some people do their homework. What a gem huh? There is very light rust on some parts, have to find out the best way to clean her up.

  6. #6
    bruce333's Avatar
    bruce333 is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Smith & Wesson Collectors Association

    There is very light rust on some parts, have to find out the best way to clean her up.
    With a piece this rare, it may be best to do nothing except prevent further rust.
    Bruce, Life Member: NRA, NCRPA, GRNC, GOA

    Naval Air Museum Barbers Point

    "I personally think we developed language because of our deep inner need to complain."--Jane Wagner
    "The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom."
    -Isaac Asimov

  7. #7
    smTm8qt is offline Junior Member
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    Baa, I ain't worried. I already got most of it off with the wire wheel Hehe. I kid, I kid.

  8. #8
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    A good, non-destructive way to remove rust is to rub it with a piece of balsa wood (from a hobby shop) with some oil on it.
    Balsa is so gently abrasive that it'll remove light rust while leaving the underlying blue alone.

  9. #9
    smTm8qt is offline Junior Member
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    Wow, ingenious. I'll give it a whirl I think... Thank you all!

  10. #10
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    A good, non-destructive way to remove rust is to rub it with a piece of balsa wood (from a hobby shop) with some oil on it.
    Balsa is so gently abrasive that it'll remove light rust while leaving the underlying blue alone.
    Pencil erasers work too. I like the white ones as they are less abrasive. But note that the rust itself is an abrasive, so brush way the rust particles frequently so as not to scratch the finish whether using the balsa wood or the pencil eraser.

    (The main reason I like the pencil eraser is that you always seem to have one around, balsa frequently requires a trip to the hobby store.)

  11. #11
    hunterfisher808's Avatar
    hunterfisher808 is offline Junior Member
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    +1! Don't rub it except to fondle her....and then very sparingly Just wipe her down with Corrosion X, It will stop any further rust development cold. Leave any other issues with rust (removal) to an expert in vintage guns. Better safe than sorry. Just my humble opinion; as one should do what one wants with their property
    Quote Originally Posted by bruce333 View Post
    Smith & Wesson Collectors Association

    With a piece this rare, it may be best to do nothing except prevent further rust.

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