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  1. #1
    Sully2 is offline Banned
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    New MP9c slide release

    Only had it about a week now and LOVE IT........BUT

    I have trouble with the tiny slide release. Dont know if its the high spring tension for the slide..or just what...but that slide release ( to me at least) is TINY. ( All other autos here are Kimber 1911's)

    Anyone make a larger release...or modify existing ones....or ??.. Ive chewed up the skin on one thumb because it "slid" down on that thing when trying to release....and now have to turn the pistol around and use my left hand ( thumb) to get it to release.

    Any help greatly appreciated

    Sully

  2. #2
    chathcock's Avatar
    chathcock is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
    and now have to turn the pistol around and use my left hand ( thumb) to get it to release.
    I am not quite sure what you mean by this, but I hope that you are being safe and not sweeping anything that shouldn't be.

    As for me, I own an XD.45c because it fits me best and I wanted passive safty mechanisms. Back to the point, while the releases are not the same, I have never used the slide release on my gun. I simply rack the slide back and let it go. I have found that it works best for me. Try it out, maybe you won't need to buy a new slide release after all.

  3. #3
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    Don't have any issue with my M&P 45. Maybe it is just tight, needs to break in a bit.

  4. #4
    Sully2 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter08 View Post
    Don't have any issue with my M&P 45. Maybe it is just tight, needs to break in a bit.
    Could be..?? I'll have a long talk with the smith next week when I take it in for some trigger work to be done on it. I sure is TIGHT though.

  5. #5
    Sully2 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by chathcock View Post
    I am not quite sure what you mean by this, but I hope that you are being safe and not sweeping anything that shouldn't be.

    As for me, I own an XD.45c because it fits me best and I wanted passive safty mechanisms. Back to the point, while the releases are not the same, I have never used the slide release on my gun. I simply rack the slide back and let it go. I have found that it works best for me. Try it out, maybe you won't need to buy a new slide release after all.
    Using the slide release to chamber a fresh round and NOT pulling the slide back and letting it slingshot is the PROPER manner to chamber a round

  6. #6
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
    TOF is offline Senior Member
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    Both the release and slide generally have fairly sharp mating surfaces when new which makes them hard to operate. They will improve with use or what I do is use a bit of stone or 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper to round off the offending area. A little bit goes a long way. If you call S&W they will probably send you a mailing label and once back in their hands work it over for you. You will be without for a couple of weeks or so if you send it in.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
    Using the slide release to chamber a fresh round and NOT pulling the slide back and letting it slingshot is the PROPER manner to chamber a round
    I have never heard this. I've always read that police and government agents were trained to use the slingshot method when reloading because it's an easier and more positive operation to just yank back on the slide during a high-stress situation.

  8. #8
    Sully2 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by RightTurnClyde View Post
    I have never heard this. I've always read that police and government agents were trained to use the slingshot method when reloading because it's an easier and more positive operation to just yank back on the slide during a high-stress situation.
    It makes reloading into a two handed operation. One hand on the weapon itself..and the other hand to pull back the slide....as compared to a one handed operation of just using the thumb to operate the slide release.

  9. #9
    Sully2 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOF View Post
    Both the release and slide generally have fairly sharp mating surfaces when new which makes them hard to operate. They will improve with use or what I do is use a bit of stone or 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper to round off the offending area. A little bit goes a long way. If you call S&W they will probably send you a mailing label and once back in their hands work it over for you. You will be without for a couple of weeks or so if you send it in.
    If thats all it takes then my smith can do that for me. I personally dont do ANYTHING to the "insides" of firearms. I can drop it off at his home and if he doesnt have any work in line ahead of me I can pick it back up late that night or the next day.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
    Using the slide release to chamber a fresh round and NOT pulling the slide back and letting it slingshot is the PROPER manner to chamber a round
    Quote Originally Posted by Sully2 View Post
    It makes reloading into a two handed operation. One hand on the weapon itself..and the other hand to pull back the slide....as compared to a one handed operation of just using the thumb to operate the slide release.
    Please, if you wouldn't mind, provide a more thorough explanation for why you believe this to be true. Obviously using the "slingshot" method uses two hands vs. one, but it doesn't explain why it is the "PROPER" way to chamber a round.

    Thank you.

  11. #11
    Sully2 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by chathcock View Post
    Please, if you wouldn't mind, provide a more thorough explanation for why you believe this to be true. Obviously using the "slingshot" method uses two hands vs. one, but it doesn't explain why it is the "PROPER" way to chamber a round.

    Thank you.
    Briefly...
    "The slide release method

    The alternative to the slide tugging techniques is to simply push down on the slide release. This only works, of course, when loading or reloading from slide lock. SIG Sauer slide releases are near the rear of the slide, while most others are more centrally located, above the trigger guard. Glock doesn't even call theirs a slide release, because they only advocate pulling the slide to the rear. They call the part that locks the slide back a "slide stop lever." It works just like a slide release. Both Glock and the SIG pistols have fairly low-profile slide stop/release levers, and the Glocks are an especially good candidate for an extended slide stop replacement. I have changed them on all of mine. On the plus side? Well, for one, if you ARE starting from slide lock, it is absolutely the fastest way to get a round chambered and get back on target. Either of the slide tugging methods require your support hand to move through a reciprocating arc of almost three feet before it is back on the gun as the support hand. Check out how the best competitive shooters do this. But, some say, "that's a fine motor skill that will not hold up during body alarm reaction." Well, okay, hold your hands as if you are grasping a gun, with your thumbs pointing up. Now close them down into your fists. The closing motion of our opposable thumbs is, in fact, one of our most instinctive motor skills. The thumbs just push down on the lever on the way past. But the single most compelling reason for being able to release the slide in this fashion? It works one-handed. If you only train with the slide tugging methods, what you are going to do when your support hand isn't available? You have two choices. Use the slide release, or find something to push against with the rear sight or ejection port of the slide. "

    If I start with an empty weapon; locked open to see that the chamber is clear and it has no magazine inserted, I insert said magazine and release the slide using only one hand...the other ready to add additional support to the weapon.

    If I have fired all rounds and since the slide locks OPEN after the last shot...I eject the empty magazine using my thumb; insert a fresh magazine using my left hand and then release the slide using the slide release with my left hand again to support the weapon.

    At no time does my off hand block the ejection port...NOR is the weapon ever pointed at any part of MY body...nor any bystander

  12. #12
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    I understand your reasoning now, thank you for taking the time. Hopefully you'll find the part you are looking for.

  13. #13
    Sully2 is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by chathcock View Post
    I understand your reasoning now, thank you for taking the time. Hopefully you'll find the part you are looking for.
    If Im right..??...I already have "the parts"...but like MANY "mass produced products" ( of any sort) a little "blue printing" and polishing normally will improve their performance

  14. #14
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    It shouldn't take your Smith very long to take the sharp edges off of the release zone. Breaking the sharp edges with a slight polished radius does the trick.

    I don't have to think about the release any more, my thumb just flicks it a few millisecond after a fresh mag is in place and every thing proceeds automatically except the need to pull the trigger.

    The first 10,000 M&P's had a flat release tab that was almost impossible to use without a 2 hand release. I had one. S&W early on saw the need and formed an outward protruding radius in the tab so we could release with our thumbs if we chose. Keeping the price down through automation rather than hand fitting leaves a couple of areas open for fine tuning. The slide release and trigger are the only areas I have found to need a little attention. Both are drastically improved by a bit of polishing.

    Whether you use the device as a slide release or use the overhand method is optional with modern pistols. Newer designs intentionally accommodate both.

    I hope you enjoy your M&P as much as I have mine.


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