Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    chris441's Avatar
    chris441 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    115

    Question S&W frame style difference(Chiefs, Body, Cent)

    So I have decided I want a S&W revolver. I am leaning towards stainless in a J frame. So that leaves me with choosing between 60(Chiefs Special), 640(Centennial), and 649(Bodyguard).

    Who can tell me the difference between all three frame styles including benefits and downfalls to each? Functionally is there any difference or is it all just appearance?

    Do any of them have a manual safety?

    I have read plenty of posts stating peoples preferences but none really explained the differences and why you liked a particular one over another other then the Chiefs having an exposed hammer that 'could' possibly snag.

    As usual, thanks for help!

  2. #2
    chris441's Avatar
    chris441 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    115
    Ok after searching the net a bit I found this info....is it correct?

    The Chiefs Special and Bodyguard are the same except the hammer is shrouded on the bodyguard and it has a manual cocking button, both are SA or DA while the Centennial is DAO.

    If that's correct guessing it all really just comes down to preference. If you want to shoot SA and DA you need to choose between bodyguard and chiefs, probably lean bodyguard if you are carrying. If you don't care about SA then the Centennial.

    So I understand the functional differences in SA and DA, but why/when would I use one or the other?

  3. #3
    wjh2657's Avatar
    wjh2657 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lafayette, TN
    Posts
    304
    Before you get hung up on the SA issue, consider how the weapon was meant to be used. It is an up close rapid fire weapon. I have both visible hammer models (60, 317 and 637) and enclosed hammer (640 and 642 ),there is no such thing as a hammerless J Frame. SA is for precise, aimed fire which is not a real purpose for the J Frame, albeit this can be done. I have the visible hammer models primarily just because I wanted more J Frames! Besides that they are cute and sexy, remind me of all my favorite private eye movies! That said, I EDC the 642 in the pocket or the 640 in a belt holster. There is less to snag and less chance of gumming up the internals with lint and cookie crumbs!

  4. #4
    deputy125 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    53
    the dao versions reduce the possibility of a "hair trigger" and removes the "accidential discharge" argument in a self-defense shooting......

    the single action function is to obtain a greater level of "pinpoint" accuracy easier.....though many a fan of dao shooting just might argue different.....

    dao shooting can be very accurate with practice.

    for ccw, i prefer a snag free profile in the model 640 and the 638. All shooting i do is double action, center mass, and quick.......

  5. #5
    chris441's Avatar
    chris441 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by wjh2657 View Post
    ...consider how the weapon was meant to be used.
    that's actually whats making the process harder. I carry a semi-auto now. More then likely it will be in its case and used at the range. It could be used for home SD...not sure if I will ever carry it. I am also considering the larger framed ones to....but was leaning towards the J frame since the possibility of carrying exists.

    What frame S&W's are the most fun to play with at the range? Unfortunately you don't see a bunch of different revolvers at the range to rent....I guess I need to make some friends with guns so I can shoot their stuff!

  6. #6
    wjh2657's Avatar
    wjh2657 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lafayette, TN
    Posts
    304
    The process just got harder: All J -Frames are fun to play with! For all around general purpose the Bodyguards are probably your best bet.

    The one I have the most fun with is my 1 7/8" barreled 317 in .22 LR. I shoot it daily with CCI CBs at a bullet trap in my gargae for practice.


  7. #7
    johnr is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    piedemont triad area nc
    Posts
    140
    i am looking at the revolver for my next purchase also. not intending to cc i have moved up to the k frame in s & w. when i started looking, the 686 with a 6" barrel really got my attention. i like the added value of the 357 for self defense/home protection with the option to shoot 38 at the range for practice.

    a friend has the 686 with a 4" barrel and is much more accurate at the range than i am. if you will be shooting/practicing beyond the 25-30 yard, look for a longer barrell.

    just my thoughts

    john

  8. #8
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,247
    Quote Originally Posted by chris441 View Post
    ...[Models] 60(Chiefs Special), 640(Centennial), and 649(Bodyguard)...Do any of them have a manual safety? [emphasis added]...
    Double-action and so-called double-action-only revolvers have no need for a separate safety. The long, fairly stiff DA trigger pull is safety enough, and you must never put one into SA (pre-cocked, as it were) unless you really, truly intend to shoot something.
    (You—or someone—said "hair trigger": Well, that isn't exactly correct, because the SA trigger pull will be somewhere between three and six pounds. "Hair trigger" implies a pull weight in ounces. But it will be much easier to set the gun off from SA-cocked than ever it would be by DA.)
    Someone does make an accessory safety device for S&W revolvers. It (expensively) turns the gun's cylinder release into a safety lever. Push forward to release the cylinder, or push upwards to put the safety "on." You can perhaps see in your mind the possible SNAFUs to which this device could lead. Bad idea for a defensive weapon, I think.
    Rather than relying on unnecessary mechanical safety devices, I suggest that you would do better to rely instead upon the "universal safety device" that resides within your head, between your ears.

  9. #9
    VAMarine's Avatar
    VAMarine is offline Administrator
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,336
    Quote Originally Posted by chris441 View Post
    Do any of them have a manual safety?
    Of those models, no.

    The model 40 does have a grip safety and is commonly referred to as the "Lemon squeezer"


  10. #10
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,247
    I'm not sure that I'd call a grip safety a "manual safety."
    Maybe I misconstrued the OP's question, but to me a "manual safety" means a device like that of a 1911: something that you turn on or off as a separate act.

  11. #11
    chris441's Avatar
    chris441 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Rather than relying on unnecessary mechanical safety devices, I suggest that you would do better to rely instead upon the "universal safety device" that resides within your head, between your ears.
    I agree with your statement 100% and thanks for the trigger information. I haven't shot a revolver yet so I haven't felt that long trigger pull....I prefer no safety but it always seems easier to get the wife's buy in if the gun has one Its always the first thing she asks me about any weapon I am considering and this would probably be the weapon that she would grab if ever needed since she can't rack the slide on my XD quickly.

    Thanks for everyone's help. I still haven't decided what I want but I have a lot info to make my decision.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

317 hammer in j frame
,

centennial stainless j frame model 640 used

,

difference between s&w frames

,
difference between smith and wesson different frames
,
difference between smith and wesson revolver frames
,

differences between smith and wesson frames

,

how to tell smith and wesson frame types

,
how to tell the diffrence between s&w frams
,
how to tell the frame type on a smith and wesson
,
s and w frame styles
,

s&w frame styles

,
s&w styles
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1