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  1. #1
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Talking What cleaning kit for use on Sig 226?

    Hello,

    I just picked up a Sig 226 (40 cal) this past weekend. While going over the owners manual it said I should clean it before it's first use. Are there any cleaning kits or separate products that you've used on your 226 that you can recommend?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    SaltyDog's Avatar
    SaltyDog is offline Member
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    Any general cleaning kit will work. I purchased the Kleenbore kit as it has everything you need to get started http://secure.armorholdings.com/kleen-bore/lawkits.html You can change to different oils/cleaners later if you want.

  3. #3
    tekhead1219's Avatar
    tekhead1219 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaltyDog View Post
    Any general cleaning kit will work. I purchased the Kleenbore kit as it has everything you need to get started http://secure.armorholdings.com/kleen-bore/lawkits.html You can change to different oils/cleaners later if you want.
    +1...also Hoppes will work. Just a good general kit will serve your purpose well.

  4. #4
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Thanks for the replies, I do have another question. I was on YouTube watching a guy clean his Sig 229 9mm. This guy took cleaning his Sig to the extreme. He used this stuff call Breaker something; he had 4 different brushes (2 nylon, 1 brass, 1 soft metal), and let stuff soak for hours. Is that the level of cleaning I need to do every time I clean my gun? Or should level of cleaning be considered one a year, kind of like detailing your car?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnet158 View Post
    Thanks for the replies, I do have another question. I was on YouTube watching a guy clean his Sig 229 9mm. This guy took cleaning his Sig to the extreme. He used this stuff call Breaker something; he had 4 different brushes (2 nylon, 1 brass, 1 soft metal), and let stuff soak for hours. Is that the level of cleaning I need to do every time I clean my gun? Or should level of cleaning be considered one a year, kind of like detailing your car?
    Wow.

    No...I personally do not think you need four brushes to clean a bore....ever.

    Then again, depending on how often you shoot, cleaning a handgun once a year could be pretty negligent! Actually, I take that back. Cleaning a gun once a year is negligent regardless of how often you shoot. Your firearm deserves more periodic attention if for no other reason than to prevent rust, or address it in its early stages if it is found. It may not need a bore scrub but a light coat of oil never hurts and it can be done quickly.

    My rule of thumb is, if I am going to shoot it, I set aside an hour after shooting to clean it. You're fortunate with a Sig as it's very well-built in regards to cleaning; there are not a whole lot of hard-to-get areas inside the frame and slide.

    This is my list of cleaning gear:

    -Hoppe's #9
    -barrel rod (for the bore brush)
    -brass bore brush
    -cloth loop attachment to the barrel rod
    -Qtips (for the hard-to-get areas, and lubing slide rail guides)
    -toothbrush or nylon brush
    -Tetra Gun Grease
    -RemOil
    and my most recent addition to my cleaning arsenal:
    -plastic toothpicks/flossers (these things are amazing!!!)

    This is my routine:

    1) check firearm to make sure it is NOT loaded
    2) field strip firearm
    3) drybrush barrel with brass bore brush a few times
    4) attach cloth loop to rod, insert cloth, soak it with Hoppe's, stick in the barrel (let it sit for the duration of cleaning other firearm parts)
    5a) use Hoppe's-soaked cloths to wipe down inside and outside of slide
    5b) use Hoppe's-soaked Qtip to get to smaller areas of the slide, especially the slide rails
    5c) use plastic toothpicks to get to the "impossible" areas of the slide...the area behind the extractor hook and corners of the breech face are perfect examples...LOTS of caked crud can build up there
    5d) wipe down slide with dry cloths once slide-cleanliness is satisfactory
    6a) use Hoppe's-soaked cloths to wipe down inside and outside of frame
    6b) use Hoppe's-soaked Qtip to get to smaller areas of the frame, especially around the hammer and trigger mechanisms
    6c) wipe down frame with dry cloths once frame-cleanliness is satisfactory
    7) disassemble mags and wipe down with cloth, use Hoppe's sparingly if at all, on the mags (mags aren't subject to high pressures like the slide, barrel, and frame, thus it's really not needed... also, leaving even trace amounts Hoppe's in loaded mags can cause live ammo's copper and brass to oxidize.... no good!!!)
    8a) remove rod from barrel, it's done soaking
    8b) attach Hoppe's-soaked bore brush to rod and scrub bore
    8c) attach cloth loop with a dry cloth to rod and wipe down bore
    8d) repeat 8b and 8c until bore cleanliness is satisfactory
    8e) inspect corners and crevaces of the locking block and chamber looking for the same caked crud which collects behind the extactor hook, use a combo of plastic toothpicks, Hoppe's and cloth to remove
    9) wipe down all firearm parts to remove Hoppe's
    10a) apply gun grease to all metal slide, frame, and barrel contact points (this stuff works VERY well; a little goes a long way)
    10b) apply oil to smaller trigger/hammer/striker components (RemOil will spread from the applied surface to other attached surfaces very quickly; one drop on the trigger mechanism and one drop on the hammer mechanism is more than enough...the excess will have to be wiped down after some dry firing).
    10c) apply 1-3 drops of oil to a dry cloth and use it to coat the inside and outside of the mags
    11) assemble the mags
    12) assemble the weapon
    13) rack the slide and dryfire the weapon a few times to let the lubes even out within the firearm, and using the cloth from 10c, spread the excess oil from the trigger/hammer areas to apply a light, even coat to all external metal surfaces of the firearm

    Once you get into the habit of the routine above, or something similar to it, cleaning a handgun can be done in less than an hour. Obviously this is not an end-all-beat-all guide to cleaning guns (ex: Glock trigger mechanisms are mostly polymer so there's no reason to apply oil to them), but this works very well for me. Maybe I'm obsessive about keeping my firearms clean but they're in great shape and statistically, they have NEVER failed me.

  6. #6
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Thanks for the detailed post. I intend on cleaning my gun after every trip to the range. Iím just looking for advice on either buying a cleaning kit or building my own.


    The video I seen on YouTube to me was more like waxing your car every time you cleaned it, over kill. This guy was very very meticulous.

  7. #7
    Growler67's Avatar
    Growler67 is offline Member
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    Just buy a generalized kit. You'll be replacing brushes and swabs and such over time and as such you'll be "customizing" it eventually. Patches are disposable and oil gets used up. You'll be fine.

  8. #8
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Pick up a Bore Snake, http://www.hoppes.com/products/ca_boresnakes.html , to replace the rod and brush. Great little addition to the cleaning kit.

  9. #9
    dblshred's Avatar
    dblshred is offline Junior Member
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    Have you seen the maintenance videos on the Sig site? On the left of the homepage go to customer assistance>maintenance guides. You may be surprised how basic and non-fanatical their recommendations are.

  10. #10
    oak1971's Avatar
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    Bore snake, CLP, q tips for rails, grease on the rails. Done.

  11. #11
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by oak1971 View Post
    Bore snake, CLP, q tips for rails, grease on the rails. Done.
    Would that be Break-free CLP? Thanks.

  12. #12
    oak1971's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnet158 View Post
    Would that be Break-free CLP? Thanks.
    Yep.

  13. #13
    SaltyDog's Avatar
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    Also check out the SLiP2000 products. I've been hearing quite a few good reviews about this stuff especially from some "good" armorers.

  14. #14
    Blanco720 is offline Junior Member
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    be sure to check the manual that came with your sig, or look it up online. it should have the manufacturers recommended clean and maintainance schedule in it if im not mistaken.

  15. #15
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SaltyDog View Post
    Also check out the SLiP2000 products. I've been hearing quite a few good reviews about this stuff especially from some "good" armorers.

    Sig uses Slip2000 lube. But I'm confused? On the Slip2000 web site they it lists it as a CLP. Is this one product all I need to use to Clean, Lube, and protect my Sig?

    In the Sig web side maintenance video's they used Hoppe's #9 to clean the barrel and let it soak. After it sits for a while they wipe it clean and use Slip2000 as a barrel lube. But if Slip2000 is a CLP then shouldn't they use it instead?

    The reason I'm looking at Slip2000 is because they list Sig as a manufacture that uses it. And if I can use one product to Clean, Lube, and Protect my Sig then all the better.

    http://www.slip2000.com/users_manufacturers.html

  16. #16
    SaltyDog's Avatar
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    They use the Hoppe's #9 to clean out the bore of the barrel which not only cleans all the carbon, copper, and other
    contaminants but it also degreases removing oil build up. Then you apply the CLP or SLiP2000 to relube the bore and to clean the rest of the weapon. Additionally I also use an oil to lubricate the friction points as pointed out in the Sig manual like the slide.

    Me I use a copper cutter to clean the bore and CLP for the rest of the weapon. Then put just a little oil on the friction points (metal on metal) SLiP2000 also has a copper cutter.
    I just want to use up my other lubes before switching over to SLiP2000.

    Don't get me wrong - I have nothing against Hoppe's or any other product out there - In my shotgun days shooting 1,000's of rounds in my Remington 1100 for trap and hunting I used Hoppes exclusively and had no problems with that gun which I sold after 10 years of use. (I wish I still had that shotgun)

    Improvements are made and products like SLiP2000 come out.

  17. #17
    babs's Avatar
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    About the same for me as far as procedures, but after hoppes 9 clean-up and wipe-down I use militec-1 currently on slide and outside and top of barrel. Considering slide-glide too for giggles but happy with the militec-1.

  18. #18
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Thanks to all who replied. I purchsed a cleaning kit from Slip2000. It arrived Friday and I cleaned my Sig P226 and my wifes new XD-40. I took my time. We went to the range today and I cleaned them up again. This time it was much fasters now that I know that I'm doing.


    I've decided to use Hoppe's #9 for the barrel, and Slip2000 everywhere else. After putting about 100 rounds thru her today she had plenty of lube left, but I wipped it off and clearned her again aways.

    Thanks!

  19. #19
    babs's Avatar
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    Now here's a question for the pro's..

    I went to the range Saturday (concealed carry class.. yay!). So I cleaned the P226 that night, soaking the barrel in with patches of Hoppes 9.

    I go back clean clean clean with bore snake w/ brush, then patches (chamber to muzzle) until dry and no residue. I think, let's try a dab of militec-1 on a patch and see what happens... A completely new run of patches with crud on them, indicating the hoppes 9 didn't break it up and remove everything from the bore.... hmmm

    I figured the hoppes 9 would have been the far better cleaner, but a little dab of the M-1 showed me there was more crud to remove from that bore.

    ... is this some revelation to go to something different for bore solvent?

  20. #20
    gnet158 is offline Member
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    Same thing happend to me, eihter with or with out a long soak of Hoppe's #9. I'm intrested in what the pros have to say.

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