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  1. #21
    dblshred's Avatar
    dblshred is offline Junior Member
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    Firstly, I am anything but an expert! I avoided Hoppe's #9 because of the reputed odor (wife's nose is very sensitive). On the recommendation of one of my class instructors, I went with M-pro 7 products. They make a general gun cleaner (for carbon), and a separate copper cleaner. The advice is to use the carbon cleaner in the bore first, then the copper remover. I was under the impression (reminder: noob here) that Hoppe's #9 was a copper cleaner. Maybe the residue that you are seeing is carbon (copper residue should be greenish). Also, I was taught that a bore-specific jag is the best for cleaning. The jag with a patch fits very tightly in the bore, so it really scrubs out the bad stuff. That's my <2 cents worth.

  2. #22
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    Used the jag.. I started with a snake after running wet patches through to soak, then went to the jag w/ patches. I hear a lot of guys here using CLP.. I might try it after this bottle of hoppes 9 runs out.

  3. #23
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    I'm no expert either but I have been cleaning and shooting pistols and shotguns for about 15 years combined and can tell you Babbs you are way over cleaning. You're going to change that 9mm to a .40 S&W

    The bore snake is used as a quicky way to clean a weapon if you are at a shoot and you want to clean your weapon before dropping it back in the bag. Great also for our troops in the field. Me I've never used one. Not saying they are bad I just use a cleaning rod.

    As dblshred mentioned I would run a carbon and copper cleaner thru the bore or you can use CLP. Just make sure you use some type of solvent to breakdown the carbon so it does not build up in the bore. As mentioned before Hoppes #9 is a cleaner and degreaser which removes lead and carbon fouling as well as degreasing. Me I use the Kleenbore copper cutter which does it all.

    Now when you clean a bore as gnet158 saw in the Sig video - you swab the bore with the wire brush then with Hoppes #9 (this is what they used) and let it soak for a while (I let mine soak much less than they stated). Then run a few clean swabs thru it and lubricate (if not using a CLP) then WAHLAH! you're done. That's all there is too it.

    Now if you went back and ran a clean swab thru it after all this was done will you show some more contamination? Obviously yes. Do you need to get it perfectly squeeky clean NO. You could do this over and over and over and still get some deposit off of the steel.

    If you are cleaning the weapon according to that video at the Sig website you are cleaning it correctly.

  4. #24
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    hehe.. Well I wanted a larger caliber someday but that wasn't what I had in mind as the way to do it.

    Yeah I'll quit being lazy and using the snake as a bore brush. The bore looked pretty darn slick though once I did the final wipes with the jag and patches to dry.

    Just curious.. Anyone got links to that vid? Don't see any vids on Sig's site.. Are you referring to another? youtube maybe?

  5. #25
    dblshred's Avatar
    dblshred is offline Junior Member
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    The Sig maintenance videos can be found on their site by going to customer service>maintenance guides. They do seem unnecessarily hidden.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by babs View Post
    Now here's a question for the pro's..

    I went to the range Saturday (concealed carry class.. yay!). So I cleaned the P226 that night, soaking the barrel in with patches of Hoppes 9.

    I go back clean clean clean with bore snake w/ brush, then patches (chamber to muzzle) until dry and no residue. I think, let's try a dab of militec-1 on a patch and see what happens... A completely new run of patches with crud on them, indicating the hoppes 9 didn't break it up and remove everything from the bore.... hmmm

    I figured the hoppes 9 would have been the far better cleaner, but a little dab of the M-1 showed me there was more crud to remove from that bore.

    ... is this some revelation to go to something different for bore solvent?

    Well I am no pro but I've been using Hoppe's for several years (you can make that over a decade if you include the times I used to help Dad). I've definitely noticed Hoppe's isn't entirely thorough from time to time. It seems to be most lacking when it comes to polygonal-rifled barrels. I can scrub a barrel for an hour straight and not get all of the crap out using Hoppe's exclusively.

    One time I accidentally let used cloths sit overnight after I extensively scrubbed a polygonal barrel with Hoppe's. The next day I noticed copper oxide (blue-green crap) on cloths at the top of the pile. From this I've concluded that Hoppe's is suitable, but not best for getting rid of copper fouling.

    If I'm not mistaken the P226 has a threaded barrel so it may not be the same thing. Still I think it's worth checking. See if you can get more dirt out of the barrel when you think you've got your barrel clean and let the cloth sit overnight. If it is blue-green the next day, then you've got some copper buildup in your barrel which can be more efficiently cleaned with something other than Hoppe's.

  7. #27
    babs's Avatar
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    Checked out the vids on Sig's site...
    Very cool! Though I would have thought it a mortal sin to ever run a brush muzzle to chamber, but he was going back and forth in that video..

    His barrel bore procedure was:
    1. brush dry
    2. patch solvent
    3. grab a donut, a few minutes to soak.. 10 or so.
    4. brass jag w/ patches till scrub until dry/clean
    5. lube then patch till dry

    Good stuff.. nice to actually SEE someone do it. Not that it's anything hard, but his reassembly functional check I learned something about the disconnect check. cool beans.

  8. #28
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    Great!! Yea I do the same thing with the brush.

    One other thing I do that they didn't is while the cleaning solvent is in the bore I run the brush thru it again before cleaning with swabs.

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