SP101 too much recoil

    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
    Results 1 to 20 of 29
    Like Tree23Likes

    Thread: SP101 too much recoil

    1. #1
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Oct 2015
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      44

      SP101 too much recoil

      Hey people,

      I bought a SP101 snub nose. I picked it up on a whim, I always liked the way the look and the reputation of power. I took it to the range today and shot 50 rounds of 357 federal 158 grain and that sh*t hurt. I'm not a little guy, I've shot plenty of 40 and 45 and at worst the muzzle flip was annoying. This the first time it actually hurt to shoot, even gave me nice little blister. I made a mistake buying it without renting it first I was just so confident. What the hell is a 44 feel like?

      Anyways, I think I see why people recommend 38 special.

    2. #2
      Member Spike12's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 2008
      Posts
      326
      The SP101 is not a range gun. It's a CCW gun. As such, shooting comfort is low on the priority list. The 357MAG is a powerful round and the SP is a small gun. The results are obvious. Using different grips such as Hogue will help felt recoil but they can't change basic physics.

      Shooting .44MAG will create even more recoil obviously. So the weight and design of the gun will have a direct impact on how much felt recoil there will be. A Ruger Alaskan will be much different than a Super Blackhawk. It depends on what you're needs are: range, hunting, CCW.
      denner likes this.

    3. #3
      Senior Member Cait43's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 2013
      Location
      West Allis, WI(Milwaukee)
      Posts
      3,694
      You might want to look into the 2" Rhino.... Bullets come out the barrel on the bottom which leads to less(a lot) muzzle flip/recoil.....

      Review: Chiappa Rhino 200DS - Handguns

    4. Remove Advertisements
      HandgunForum.net
      Advertisements
       

    5. #4
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2008
      Location
      Northwest Washington State
      Posts
      8,341
      A short-barrel gun, especially any "snubbie" revolver, tends to twist in the shooter's hand when fired because the gun is too lightweight to help the shooter resist the rotational forces caused by the spinning bullet.
      This is basic Newtonian physics, and that's how it is.

      So, what can be done about it?
      First, stop using .357 Magnum loads in your little gun. Use .38 Special cartridges, instead. They will work just as well on bad guys, at the distances at which you'll be firing at them.
      Second, use .38 Special loads which are known for "soft" perceived recoil. There are cartridges loaded specifically for use in snubbies, and some of them recoil manageably.
      Third, switch to slightly softer grips. But don't use bigger grips, because they make concealment more difficult.
      Fourth, grip the gun very, very tightly. Use a "death grip" for every shot. The tendency is to relax the grip, either as a "flinch," or as an attempt to escape the unpleasant recoil. This does not work. The only way to control recoil is to grip the gun as tightly as you can, all of the time.

      If you grip the gun as tightly as you should, it may cause your trigger control to "go south" because your trigger finger will "follow" the actions of the other fingers of that hand.
      You can overcome this problem only through practice. You will need to practice what my dancer-wife calls "isolation." That is, you will need to learn to move your trigger finger completely separately from the movements, and the grip, of all of your other fingers. (This is one reason why pistol shooting isn't as easy as it looks.)
      denner, pic, hillman and 1 others like this.

    6. #5
      Member acepilot's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 2012
      Posts
      246
      Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
      So, what can be done about it?
      First, stop using .357 Magnum loads in your little gun. Use .38 Special cartridges, instead. They will work just as well on bad guys, at the distances at which you'll be firing at them.
      Well, I would counter with use .357 magnum if you use it as a carry gun. If you ever need to use it as a carry gun, I doubt you'll even notice the recoil. At least until your nerves settle down and the adrenaline is burned off. Just ask anyone that has just emerged from a car accident. They usually respond with "I'm OK", only to start feeling the pain the next day. EMT types call them the "walking wounded"...
      pic and Tiremanws like this.

    7. #6
      pic
      pic is online now
      Supporting Member HGF Gold Member

      Join Date
      Nov 2009
      Posts
      3,587
      Try the death grip as Steve above recommends. With the proper grip you should not be getting blisters.

      Use a Strong grip and let the recoil absorb into wrist, elbow, and shoulder. You eventually will have control of the recoil absorption into more of the shoulder or elbow. And follow up shots will be quicker.

      I would master the 357 round, great defensive round. The 357 snubbie can be a great training tool.
      I also recommend a great set of ear plugs.
      BTW my first CCW was a 357 snubbie. It's ok to shoot 38's, but master the 357 magnum
      Philco and acepilot like this.

    8. #7
      Senior Member Bisley's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 2008
      Location
      East Texas
      Posts
      2,518
      The worst handgun recoil I have experienced was with a Kahr K-40, using 180 grain self defense ammo. Even so, I was able to tighten my grip and adjust it after a few rounds so that I could control it without any great difficulty. The SP-101 is hefty enough to do the same. Heavy recoil usually forces a good shooter to go back to the fundamentals that made him a good shooter, and increase his focus on grip, trigger pull, and follow-through. Once you have mastered the recoil, so that it doesn't defeat your fundamental skills, then you can go back to lighter loads for repetitive accuracy practice. Once you have stopped cringing at the thought of pulling the trigger, you will adapt well to the recoil, and will probably shoot everything better.
      Steve M1911A1, hillman and pic like this.

    9. #8
      Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Posts
      250
      I find that .357 Magnum has much stouter recoil than .40 S&W or .45 ACP, and I am usually shooting it out of the larger GP100. I have shot .357 out of a smaller revolver and find it tolerable, but would not want to shoot more than a couple or three cylinder loads.

      If you plan to use the revolver as a carry weapon I would simply load it with 38 Special +P which most people find more controllable than .357 Magnum in that size revolver. If you don't plan to carry, you might want to look into a larger grip to distribute the recoil over more of your hand. The grip stud design of the SP101 and GP100 allows various grip sizes to be fit. Grips can also be swapped pretty quickly so you could consider buying a larger and/or softer grip for range use.

    10. #9
      pic
      pic is online now
      Supporting Member HGF Gold Member

      Join Date
      Nov 2009
      Posts
      3,587
      Quote Originally Posted by pblanc View Post
      I find that .357 Magnum has much stouter recoil than .40 S&W or .45 ACP, and I am usually shooting it out of the larger GP100. I have shot .357 out of a smaller revolver and find it tolerable, but would not want to shoot more than a couple or three cylinder loads.

      If you plan to use the revolver as a carry weapon I would simply load it with 38 Special +P which most people find more controllable than .357 Magnum in that size revolver. If you don't plan to carry, you might want to look into a larger grip to distribute the recoil over more of your hand. The grip stud design of the SP101 and GP100 allows various grip sizes to be fit. Grips can also be swapped pretty quickly so you could consider buying a larger and/or softer grip for range use.
      Totally disagree,,you may practice with the 38's, but as a defensive carry, it should be loaded with the 357 mags and as above mentioned you should master the 357 load and practice back n forth with both loads

    11. #10
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2008
      Location
      Northwest Washington State
      Posts
      8,341
      Quote Originally Posted by pblanc View Post
      ...you could consider buying a larger and/or softer grip for range use.
      I recommend strongly against this!
      Train and practice with the actual gun that you'll be carrying.
      You need automatic response to any threat. You must not put yourself in a position in which you have to stop and think, or stop and adjust your grip, or stop and do anything at all other than protect yourself.

    12. #11
      Senior Member desertman's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 2013
      Posts
      2,698
      Quote Originally Posted by Bisley View Post
      The worst handgun recoil I have experienced was with a Kahr K-40, using 180 grain self defense ammo. Even so, I was able to tighten my grip and adjust it after a few rounds so that I could control it without any great difficulty. The SP-101 is hefty enough to do the same. Heavy recoil usually forces a good shooter to go back to the fundamentals that made him a good shooter, and increase his focus on grip, trigger pull, and follow-through. Once you have mastered the recoil, so that it doesn't defeat your fundamental skills, then you can go back to lighter loads for repetitive accuracy practice. Once you have stopped cringing at the thought of pulling the trigger, you will adapt well to the recoil, and will probably shoot everything better.
      The worst recoil that I have experienced was with my .44 Magnum Ruger Redhawk Talo with a 2 3/4 barrel, 240 grain loads. The web of my hand felt like it was getting hit with a sledge hammer. I've also got the same gun with a 7 1/2 inch barrel that I've fired thousands of rounds through without any issues regarding recoil. Same for my four inch Model 29 of which I've also put thousand's through. A couple of cylinders full from that 2 3/4 inch Redhawk Talo was enough. I've also got a Model 629 Talo .44 magnum with a 2 3/4 barrel which I haven't even fired yet. I can only imagine what that would be like as it is not as beefy as the Redhawk. Sometimes I have to question what I was thinking when I bought those two. Other than that they are pretty cool mean looking bastards. No, I do not plan on getting rid of them though. Even though I rarely carry them or even shoot them for that matter. Of course with .44 Specials they are like shooting .22's. For self defense at least for me it's .45 semi auto's all the way.

      I also have an S&W Model 640 J-Frame .357 which is also a hand slamming little beast with .357 loads. But it is nothing like those short barreled .44 Magnums. Because of it's weight (all stainless construction) it is excellent with .38 Specials. A little heavy in the pocket though, in which case a Glock G26 or better yet G43 is a better choice for that type of carry. I'm used to shooting large caliber handguns so handling a small lightweight "nine" is nothing. When I first got into handguns I had to have the biggest, baddest, loudest handgun available and at the time it was the Model 29. At the time I just liked to go out and make a lot of noise, feel the concussion and could care less whether I hit anything or not. I'd go out and go through boxes of ammo through that thing firing it as fast as I could, so much so that I wore out the forcing cone, replacing the 8 3/8th's barrel with a 4 inch. Man those were the days!

    13. #12
      Senior Member denner's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Posts
      2,992
      Robot Check


      Robot Check

      The Hogue is larger(harder to conceal, but more purchase) than the Pachmayer, but either grip choice will make a very noticable difference concerning recoil. Try shooting 125 grain and or 38 Spl+P to find something that feels tolerable to you.

      Well, one thing for sure is that 357 Magnum is one of the best SD calibers that can be had.
      Spike12 likes this.

    14. #13
      Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2015
      Posts
      250
      The Speer Gold Dot 135gr 38 Special +P load offers excellent expansion and decent penetration when fired from short barreled revolvers. Sure, the .357 Magnum has greater penetration but that doesn't count for much if the recoil is such that you can't control follow up shots well, or you find it so unpleasant that you don't care to practice with it. I have shot Ruger SP101s with the stock Pachmayr grip (assuming that is what you have) and I thought it was pretty crappy when it came to managing recoil.
      Steve M1911A1 likes this.

    15. #14
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Oct 2015
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      44
      I'll probably just sell it rather than shoot 38 special out of it. It loses it's appeal. I didn't want a 38 special.

    16. #15
      Senior Member denner's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Posts
      2,992
      Quote Originally Posted by pblanc View Post
      I have shot Ruger SP101s with the stock Pachmayr grip (assuming that is what you have) and I thought it was pretty crappy when it came to managing recoil.

      I could be wrong, but I don't believe the Ruger SP101's come stock with Pachmayr grips.

    17. #16
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 2008
      Location
      Northwest Washington State
      Posts
      8,341
      Try something with a 3" or 4" barrel, instead.
      The heavier the gun, the better...in terms of recoil management.

    18. #17
      Senior Member denner's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Posts
      2,992
      Quote Originally Posted by NasHouston View Post
      What the hell is a 44 feel like?
      44 magnum? A hand full.

    19. #18
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Oct 2015
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      44
      Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
      Try something with a 3" or 4" barrel, instead.
      The heavier the gun, the better...in terms of recoil management.
      I'm thinking more like a 6 or 8 inch barrel. Lol

      Off topic, I didn't listen to you when you told me I shouldn't get a taurus and my dumbass went and got a taurus. 4 failures to feed, several struggles to return to battery and when I tried to clean it, the barrel wouldn't come out of the slide. I had to send it in.
      Steve M1911A1 likes this.

    20. #19
      Senior Member desertman's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 2013
      Posts
      2,698
      Quote Originally Posted by NasHouston View Post
      I'm thinking more like a 6 or 8 inch barrel. Lol

      Off topic, I didn't listen to you when you told me I shouldn't get a taurus and my dumbass went and got a taurus. 4 failures to feed, several struggles to return to battery and when I tried to clean it, the barrel wouldn't come out of the slide. I had to send it in.
      Friends don't let friends buy Taurus!
      NasHouston likes this.

    21. #20
      pic
      pic is online now
      Supporting Member HGF Gold Member

      Join Date
      Nov 2009
      Posts
      3,587
      Quote Originally Posted by NasHouston View Post
      I'll probably just sell it rather than shoot 38 special out of it. It loses it's appeal. I didn't want a 38 special.
      I don't want to ask your age, but if you're a young man, go get some leather gloves, work on your grip.
      You might be limp wristing the revolver.
      If your getting to be an old , then the 357 might be to much. Lol. Good luck

    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

    Sponsored Links

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  

    Search tags for this page

    how much recoil sp101 with 38 spl
    ,
    recoil in sp101
    ,
    recoil of ruger sp101 38
    ,
    recoil ruger sp 101 .357
    ,
    ruger sp101 2 unch and recoil
    ,

    sp-101 recoil

    ,
    sp101 recoil
    ,
    too much recoil
    Click on a term to search for related topics.