Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    233

    SR9 has a new big brother, SR40

    I'm looking forward to comparing the new SR40 to Beretta's PX4. They certainly appear to be aimed at the same market.

  2. #2
    Lateck is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southwest Arizona
    Posts
    182
    It's not much bigger! It feels the same in the hand. (Held it today)
    It's going to be my next hand gun!

    Lateck,

  3. #3
    mesz13's Avatar
    mesz13 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    62

    Got One

    I already own a SR9c so when i saw the new SR40 I had to at least look at it, Took 3 weeks but my

    dealer finally got one yesterday. Sweet looking and feeling, and I now own it. Will be taking it to

    the range this week and let u all know how it shoots, by the way I am replacing my S&W MP40 with

    this one. Liked the S&W but I reallly love all my Rugers.

  4. #4
    Jed Henson is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    50
    Just put up a review of the SR40 by Dave Spaulding. He liked it quite a bit, giving it 8.5 stars out of 10. Here's an excerpt from the article that includes his range report:

    "Because the SR40 is a striker-fired pistol, the bore axis is low over the hand, helping to reduce muzzle flip and offering good point-ability. This helps you get the gun on target fast, a feature that can’t be underrated in conflict.

    As most readers know, the .40 SW can be a real gun killer because the bullet’s weight plus its increased velocity can place a great deal of strain on the frame, especially one made of polymer. Ruger took this into account and created a heavy recoil spring and guide rod that helps tame the impact of the slide on the frame when you fire the gun. Of course, this spring also works well with the low bore axis to make the Ruger SR40 very comfortable to shoot.

    To test the SR40’s accuracy, I bench rested it at 25 yards using Giles Bags from The Wilderness, and Dirty Bird targets from Birchwood Casey. Using a number of proven loads, I shot five-round groups and measured them at their widest point. I measured velocity by placing a Shooting Chrony chronograph 15 feet in front of the gun’s muzzle and reporting the average of the five rounds.

    I also opted to replace the factory adjustable sights with a new set from Ameriglo. I see the SR40 as a combat handgun and feel that fixed sights are a better choice for this application.

    The results:

    * Corbon 135 grain DPX: 2.5″ group, 1,189 fps
    * Remington 155 grain JHP: 2.5″ group, 1,147 fps
    * Winchester 165 grain SXT: 2″ group, 1,078 fps
    * Federal 165 grain HST: 2.75″ group, 1,089 fps
    * Hornady 180 grain EXP: 1.5″ group, 942 fps

    The six-groove, one-in-10 rate of twist, combined with the orange front/serrated rear fixed sights from Ameriglo, proved to be the right combination for the SR40—all of the rounds tested were more than what I would call combat accurate.

    Remember: It’s quite likely this gun will be used closer than 25 yards, but the confrontation will be fluid, so being able to hold the rounds inside an 8” circle while both you and the target are moving would be a much better test for combative applications. Of course, such a test wouldn’t help the reader come to an informed decision because it would combine the shooter’s mettle, the environment and other related factors. Needless to say, the SR40 is capable of this type of accuracy provided the shooter is!

    I never like to waste an opportunity to get in a bit of practice, so I spent the remainder of the range session performing some combat-related drills. I used a Blade-Tech Eclipse pancake-style concealment holster molded for the SR9, and even though it was a bit snug, it still proved to be a good performer as I worked through some holster skills, El Presidente drills, reloads, malfunction clearances (using dummy rounds) and some seated and prone shooting. Running the SR40 hard and fast is not difficult due to the short trigger action, the recoil spring system and the low bore axis.

    I did suffer a few malfunctions early on, all of which were failure to feeds, but I find this to be common with many new guns, so I just tap-racked my way through them and it cleared itself up within the first 25–30 rounds.

    Important: Always test your gun with the load you intend to carry before you hit the street! New guns often choke a bit and need a break-in period, so do yourself a favor and break them in!"

    The full article is here: Ruger SR40 Review | GunGunsGuns.net

  5. #5
    Lateck is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southwest Arizona
    Posts
    182
    Jed, thanks for the link.

    I can agree with most of it.
    Only I have not had ANY problems with the first couple of hundred rounds. Including 50 that were shot with the gun straight out of the box. (No cleaning either, at that time).

    The SR40 is a great gun. It's a shame there is so little love shown..

    But what someone else said on another forum: No Problems=No Haters, No Haters=No Fan-boys, No Fan-boys=no news......

    Lateck,

  6. #6
    Razorback58's Avatar
    Razorback58 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texarkana, AR
    Posts
    85
    I bought a new Ruger SR40 this week and finally got the chance to shoot it today. Not a single problem out of it and seemed to be very accurate. It had very little recoil compared to some of the other .40's that I've fired. I've been carrying it IWB with an Uncle Mike's holster and it has been fairly comfortable. I think that it's a keeper!

  7. #7
    smlranger is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia
    Posts
    33
    I just got the SR9c and love shooting it. I have a Springfield XD40 and, while my research before buying it suggested it was a good choice for the money, I don't really love shooting it. Can anyone give me a comparison of the XD40 vs. the SR40? If the SR40 shoots as sweet as my SR9, I may sell the XD and get the Ruger.

  8. #8
    Razorback58's Avatar
    Razorback58 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texarkana, AR
    Posts
    85
    My son has the XD40 3.8 and I had thought about buying one myself. After taking his to the range one day I decided that it just wasn't for me. While it is a great gun, I just didn't enjoy shooting it. I bought the SR40 instead and am very glad that I did. Now if I could just find a good IWB holster for it I'll be happy.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

ameriglo sights sr40
,
ruger sr40 accuracy
,

ruger sr40 vs sr9

,
ruger sr40c holster
,
ruger sr9 vs ruger sr40
,

ruger sr9 vs sr40

,
sr 40 vs xd 40
,
sr40 or sr9
,
sr40 vs mp40
,
sr40 vs sr9
,

sr9 vs sr40

,
sr9 vs sr40 recoil
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1