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Thread: Mark III Issue

  1. #1
    Bishop746's Avatar
    Bishop746 is offline Junior Member
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    Mark III Issue

    I finally bought a stainless Mark III after many years of wanting one and my stepson and I had a great time at the range shooting it. Im going to put V-notch sights on it because my eyes aren't what they used to be and the range I go too seems to be trying to save the enviorment by having no lights on in the range.

    When I got home and tried to clean it I ran into a problem though. Not only did I loose an entire saturday trying to put this weapon back together but I lost the Firing Pin Stop(partA03500) in the process. I always disassemble a firearm over a plastic pan but the bolt surprised me when it came loose and I might have lost it then. I have tore my garage apart looking for this pin but no luck so Im going to get one from Ruger.

    Is this a common issue?

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  3. #2
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    I don't know about the firing pin stop, but I do know this design is infamously difficult to reassemble until you "get the hang of it." It's probably the biggest complaint you see about the Ruger Mark II/III pistols, and actually one reason I bought a Browning Buckmark instead of the Ruger.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  4. #3
    Bishop746's Avatar
    Bishop746 is offline Junior Member
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    I've never seen a pistol that you have to "point" in so many different directions to get it back together.

    Ruger called me back and I got some interesting info that I want to pass along. The Firing Pin Stop is not longer a pin per se but a hollow open pin that does not come out. I was basing my info on a video posted on the Ruger website (and my manual)that showed a solid pin in the bolt, I was informed today that the video is out of date.

  5. #4
    GTD
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    I have a ruger markIII hunter, it took me a few times disassembling and reassembling to get use to it. I could see why some may chose buckmark for that reason. Be patent, if itís new like mine was, after a few times disassembling, parts seem to loosen up just enough to make cleaning somewhat enjoyable. I donít disassemble every time I shoot it. Spray it down with some gun scrubber, run a bore snake threw it and Iím good for a few trips to the range.

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    skoro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    I don't know about the firing pin stop, but I do know this design is infamously difficult to reassemble until you "get the hang of it." It's probably the biggest complaint you see about the Ruger Mark II/III pistols, and actually one reason I bought a Browning Buckmark instead of the Ruger.
    The little Ruger is a pain to reassemble, but it's a great shooting pistol.

  7. #6
    neophyte is offline Member
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    Bullseye

    If you want to; go to GunTalkonline: The folks there and especially the "Bullseye" know the Ruger MK's. He has put together pictures, video and good simple explanations.
    I believe he may cruise through here.

    Follow up with this new firing pin. and Thanks

  8. #7
    revolvers&w is offline Junior Member
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    Try the NC Star red dot to aid hose eyes

  9. #8
    Teuthis is offline Member
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    It is far best to read and memorize the drill for field stripping and reassembling the Ruger Mark II or III. Then the process becomes simple. The key is to be thorough in your learning and then practice it. Do not wait and field strip it only when you shoot it, and have then forgotten the process. Learn it up front, military style, and then you will always know it and you can probably do it in the dark. haha

  10. #9
    billt's Avatar
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    I don't understand why people feel the need to disassemble the Ruger Mark II's and III's for cleaning? I have 2 Ruger Mark II's and both have digested thousands of rounds and neither have ever been apart, and both are cleaner than the day I brought both of them home and removed them from the box. I take a metal 2 pound coffee can and fill it about halfway up with clean Kerosene or WD-40. You can buy either one at Home Depot or Lowe's in gallon size cans very reasonably. I take one of those cheap Chinese, fake horsehair paint brushes and cut the bristles about halfway off with a pair of scissors which makes them stiffer. Remove the magazine and put it right in the can and let it soak. Then using the brush liberally brush the bolt, chamber area, magazine well, everywhere. If you want you can remove the grip panels, although the WD-40 or Kerosene won't hurt them. After brushing all of the gun I then blow everything dry with compressed air. If you don't have an air compressor, you can wipe as much as you can off with a clean terrycloth towel, then use that "canned air" for computers and cameras. Everything will be clean and dry, inside and out. I then lubricate everything, wipe the gun down with an oily rag, and I'm done. Usually in about 10 minutes tops. I clean slides and frames of auto pistols the same way as well. Also, bolts on bolt action rifles will come clean right down to the bare metal without any disassembly required. Taking guns apart that don't need to be is always met with resistance in the reassembly process. The Colt Woodsman is another .22 automatic that is a pain in the a$$ to reassemble. It can be cleaned in the same exact manner without any grief, and in a timely fashion. If you want to get fancy, you can buy one of those small, electric parts washers from Harbor Freight for around $30.00, keep the WD-40, (smells better), or Kerosene in it out in the garage. Then it's ready to go when you are. Bill T.

  11. #10
    tschmittel's Avatar
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    Like everybody says after a few times you'll get the hang of it.
    This really helped me: http://www.guntalk-online.com/2245detailstripping.htm

  12. #11
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    My first MKII was a used blued bull barrel (traded it in on the SS comp series I have now), I waited for the manual from Ruger before I disassembled it and during that time I must have run close to 2,000 rounds through it before it got a thorough cleaning, all I would do between range sessions is clean the bore, remove excess fouling, and wipe it down. No jams, FTF's or FTE, I guess that's why I got the SS one so I could neglect it even more. It's a bit finicky with ammo though.

  13. #12
    BeefyBeefo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtlmgc View Post
    My first MKII was a used blued bull barrel (traded it in on the SS comp series I have now), I waited for the manual from Ruger before I disassembled it and during that time I must have run close to 2,000 rounds through it before it got a thorough cleaning, all I would do between range sessions is clean the bore, remove excess fouling, and wipe it down. No jams, FTF's or FTE, I guess that's why I got the SS one so I could neglect it even more. It's a bit finicky with ammo though.
    That's how mine has been - minus being finicky with ammo. I have a few thousand of the cheap federal bulk pack rounds from WM through my used MKII (which was dirty when I bought it) and I haven't had any problems at all. I haven't field stripped it yet. All I do after the session is spray the gun down (inside and out) with G96 (similar to CLP) and wipe it down. It's been a great gun!

    -Jeff-

  14. #13
    Drill Sergeant's Avatar
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    My new MKIII Hunter had a loose front sight problem. I used blue Loc-Tite on it and will try it our next week at the range.

    I did take a huge Kaibab squirrel with it last week, though. Yeah!!

  15. #14
    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
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    I don't take my MK III apart. I will soak it in alcohol for a while then use a brush and barrel brush and scrub it out. It's worked out so far.

  16. #15
    jspellacy is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drill Sergeant View Post
    My new MKIII Hunter had a loose front sight problem. I used blue Loc-Tite on it and will try it our next week at the range.

    I did take a huge Kaibab squirrel with it last week, though. Yeah!!
    I also have an issue with the front sight of my MKIII Hunter.

    Did the Loc-Tite thing also...but....used RED and it still comes loose. Heat I guess broke down the red.

    I don't shoot it anymore without having a screwdriver handy.

  17. #16
    0mattellis0 is offline Junior Member
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    Yes. I have a Mark 22/45. It took me 2 hours to re-assemble. Then I put took it apart again, and reassembled it. Only took me 15 minutes the 2nd time. I agree that you have to 'get-used-to-it'. I still like it and it's fun to shoot.

  18. #17
    JeffWard's Avatar
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    I haven't taken my Buckmark apart in about 3000 rounds...

    It's a pain, since I have the red-dot scope on it on a rail from Tactical Solutions that spans the whole assembly, and removing it means re-zeroing and tweeking...

    I clean everything I can reach with a toothbrush, and CLP, and bore-snake it AWAY from the chamber, by pushing an empty rod down the barrel, slipping a cloth through inside the chamber, and pulling it out forward... A bit tricky, but effective. Not bad since the "chamber" passes straight through.

    I've also gone to sprininging for slightly pricier CCI ammo, but it's cleaner...

    JeffWard

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    Firing Pin Stop...

    I've become very skilled at takedown and reassembly of my Ruger MKIII Gov't/Comp pistol. I can't for the life of me understand why the rolled pin used for the the firing pin stop would fall out. Of the four times I purposely "knocked" it out for deep cleaning, it never seemed remotely lose enough to fall free from the bolt. I cannot say for sure but it sounds like the roll pin may have been defective and, somehow, split? Is the firearm used? It may have been mishandled by its previous owner.

    As for all this cleaning advice, don't limit yourself to cleaning the gun only from open surfaces while assembled. Rimfires get terribly dirty and even less reliable when so neglected. The tight spaces of the MKIII are difficult to get fully clean disassembled let alone fully assembled. Learn the drill, find your groove and watch the frustration disappear and be replaced by a wonderful feeling of accomplishment. Your gun will thank you with a long, productive life.

    Excellent choice in firearms, BTW.

  20. #19
    Too Slow '90 is offline Junior Member
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    I took my MK III apart last night mainly because of all of the posts talking about how difficult it is. The descriptions and instruction in the manual leave alot to be desired but I managed to pull it off. Take down, cleaning and re-assembly took a little over an hour. Easily four times as long as anything else I own. I am sure the next time will be easier.

  21. #20
    gilream's Avatar
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    I just bought a Mark III Hunter. Fired it for the first time yesterday testing different ammo. I too found the front sight screw to be loose when I got home. Don't know if it came out of the box that way or if it loosed up on the range. What kind of locktite works best for this ailment?

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