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  1. #1
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    Just bought a used Super RedHawk,,,needs some TLC....

    The gun has some scratches on it and I was wondering what grit sand paper or steel wool I should use to remove them?

    Any help guys?

  2. #2
    rustygun is offline Member HGF Gold Member
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    Scotch brite will work start with fine don't be to aggressive. There are also polishing compounds you can use I found them at sears in different grades that can be used with like a dremel polishing wheel. No sand paper. Just be careful you don't want to make it worse. You have to polish out the scratch then blend it in to the existing finish. Work like a surgeon not a carpenter.
    Last edited by rustygun; 03-24-2014 at 08:51 PM.

  3. #3
    desertman is offline Member
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    Capt Rick Hiott:
    It all depends on how deep the scratches are and what type of finish you want, do not use steel wool, little bits and pieces of it will find it's way into the inner workings of the gun and it will rust, and cause the stainless steel to rust, wherever it makes contact. You can start by polishing out the scratches with 400 grit wet or dry sandpaper the type that is used for automotive finishes. Then graduate to 600, then 1500, then 2000 depending on the amount of luster that you want. On a brushed finish, polish in the same direction as the grain. The beauty of stainless steel is that you can easily polish out the scratches just as you would an automotive finish. On a matte or brushed stainless or bead blasted finish the scratches stand out more and as you polish them out you will end up getting shiny spots similar to holster wear. With different grits of wet or dry even Scotch Brite it's easier to match the factory finish if it came with a brushed stainless finish. On a bead blasted finish you will have to use an air eraser, similar to an air brush only it's a mini sandblaster, and choose the proper abrasive depending on the original texture, if you want to retain that look. Otherwise you will have to polish the entire gun to give it a brushed or mirror finish. On my particular stainless steel guns I like a mirror finish. With a mirror finish if it gets scratched it's a lot easier to just polish out the scratch and it will automatically blend in with the rest of the gun. Sometimes I will polish only the "flats" on semi autos and or polish the controls leaving the rest matte, giving it a nice contrast. Depending on how deep the scratches are Scotch Brite might work, but you will probably need something more aggressive. As "Rustygun" says work like a surgeon and not like a carpenter. I usually polish all of my stainless steel guns regardless if they are scratched. I learned how to work with stainless steel having restored antique cars especially with their dinged up and scratched stainless steel trim that was basically irreplaceable. But whatever method you choose you will have to thoroughly clean the gun inside and out when you are done. I gave you a lot to think about, take your time it's not that complicated and don't be in a hurry.

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys. I have about 30 years as a professional auto body refinisher, so this will not be a problem at all. I have also refinished other guns in the past.

    What color Scotch Brite pad? I have red and gray in my shop. The gun has a brushed finish. I'm thinking Ill start with the gray and see what happens.......I also have plenty of 400 and other grits.

    Thanks for your time.

  5. #5
    desertman is offline Member
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    Capt Rick Hiott:
    "Thanks guys. I have about 30 years as a professional auto body refinisher, so this will not be a problem at all. I have also refinished other guns in the past."
    You should have no problem, I don't know about the Scotch Brite. I've always used wet or dry from 400 to 2000 Grit. What's nice about stainless is you can always start over if you don't get your desired finish.

  6. #6
    rex
    rex is offline Senior Member
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    I'd start with the grey, those red ones are pretty course. On cars I never use the side that has the printing because whatever they use can throw a deeper scratch in the paint, but I doubt that will be a problem with steel in the initial stages of working the marks out.

  7. #7
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  8. #8
    desertman is offline Member
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    Capt Rick Hiott:
    Thanks for the information on the Scotch Brite. I never knew they had so many different types, I'll have to try it. Another thing I forgot to mention about wet or dry paper is that it can be rolled into small tubes to get into nooks and cranny's. I also bought sheets of styrene plastic of different thicknesses from hobby supply stores, which can be cut down to different widths and shapes, wrapped with the paper and used as a polishing tool for small areas. I also find that as the fine grit paper gets dull it becomes more pliable and it almost becomes kind of like a polishing cloth which really brings out a mirror like finish. I used some of this on a Henry Mare's Leg receiver which was made of brass and was etched with finger prints from being handled at the gun store followed by wiping it down with NEVR-DULL magic wadding polish which Henry recommended to keep the brass receiver shiny. It can be used on all metals, and can be purchased at True-Value hardware stores, at least that's where I bought mine. I find that polishing out stainless steel can be very rewarding although it does take time. Maybe that's why I got into restoring cars. Good luck with your Super Redhawk, I'm sure you'll be very happy with it when it's done.

  9. #9
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    Yea,,,your right. I have been using 3M wet-dry sand paper for about 25 years. Its good stuff!
    That NEVR-DULL has been around for a looooong time too.

    Now that I think about it,,I might just blast it. Ive got a nice big blast cabnet. (Beats the helll out of rubbing on it)

  10. #10
    rex
    rex is offline Senior Member
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    That Scothbrite list isn't complete, there's a gold between the fine grey and the white that has a mild soap in it. Just sayin'. Last time I got the gold it came in a roll instead of precut pads, but it was just a little too fine for my liking with the paint line I was using then.

  11. #11
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    Are you talking about a "3M" pad? Sounds like another brand to me. Could it have been Mirka or FibraTex...

  12. #12
    rex
    rex is offline Senior Member
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    No, it's 3M. I use a lot of the 7448 for final finish prep and 7447 for jambs or those hard to reach spots before priming. I haven't used the gold for a while so I can't say what the product number is but I know my paint jobber stocks it. While Norton may also make it I remember getting a roll of it about 8 or so years ago to try on the recommendation of my paint rep and hated it, it took me twice as long to edge my blend panels it's so fine and breaks down faster. Now I just take a slightly used grey with water and it duplicates about 700 on the non printed side, borderline for the Spies clear I'm now using. If I use the printed side or a fresh pad I can it will show up in the clear if I don't slide 800 over it to mellow it out. I never have agreed with 3M's grit assignment on those pads, I find they are a little courser than what they designate.

  13. #13
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    Your right Rex,,,they are a little courser than what they designate.

    I have changed my mind about the finish on the gun. What should I use to blast my RedHawk with to get a fine satin finish? There is so much media out there I dont know what to use.......

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