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Thread: Trigger Problem

  1. #1
    Geoff's Avatar
    Geoff is offline Junior Member
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    Unhappy Trigger Problem

    Hey,

    I recently contacted Ruger about the trigger pull on my P89. I asked about the pounds of force it takes to pull the trigger. My response was: "The factory specifications for the P89 trigger, when leaving the
    factory, are as follows. Double Action 9 - 15 pounds / Single Action 4 - 6
    pounds."

    Okay, since I am new to this does the explanation mean that it takes 9 pounds of force to pull the trigger when the hammer is back and 15 pounds of force when the hammer is against the firing pin?

    If so, both numbers seem fairly excessive to me. Exactly what is involved in reducing these numbers?

  2. #2
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Hey,

    I recently contacted Ruger about the trigger pull on my P89. I asked about the pounds of force it takes to pull the trigger. My response was: "The factory specifications for the P89 trigger, when leaving the
    factory, are as follows. Double Action 9 - 15 pounds / Single Action 4 - 6
    pounds."

    Okay, since I am new to this does the explanation mean that it takes 9 pounds of force to pull the trigger when the hammer is back and 15 pounds of force when the hammer is against the firing pin?

    If so, both numbers seem fairly excessive to me. Exactly what is involved in reducing these numbers?
    I understand those numbers to mean the trigger pull weight when the hammer is already cocked (Single Action) will range from 4 to 6 pounds; and the trigger pull weight for Double Action (starting with the hammer down, in the decocked position) will range from 9 to 15 pounds.

    They give a "range" of pull weights because tolerances will vary even within a single production run; a dirty or dry weapon might require more force to activate the trigger than a clean/lubricated one; and because the trigger pull weight can vary over the life of the weapon (typically very heavy and somewhat gritty when new, and getting lighter and smoother as the gun "breaks in" and the parts polish each other where they rub together).

    For many guns, a gunsmith "trigger job" can significantly reduce the amount of force needed to fire the weapon, and also make the trigger action smoother (more important than weight in some folks' opinion). Unfortunately, because of their very reasonable initial price, there has never been a big market for gunsmith trigger-pull smoothing of Ruger centerfire autos; almost no one who spent $200-$300 to buy one wants to spend another $200+ dollars to tune it up.

  3. #3
    gmaske's Avatar
    gmaske is offline Senior Member
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    Trigger pull can be adjusted by installing a Wolff spring kit. You can order them from http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...838&t=11082005. They are pretty easy to install. PM me if you need some help. I put a set in my P345 and they worked wonders. Trust me on this! If you are handy at all this takes about 15 min.s and involves very little in the way of disassembly

  4. #4
    Joeywhat's Avatar
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    Do you want the trigger weight reduced because those numbers seem high, or because you feel that the trigger takes too much force to pull?

    I'd shoot it for a while, as you find that you'll become more accustomed to the trigger, and the pull will get slightly lighter.

  5. #5
    gmaske's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joeywhat View Post
    Do you want the trigger weight reduced because those numbers seem high, or because you feel that the trigger takes too much force to pull?

    I'd shoot it for a while, as you find that you'll become more accustomed to the trigger, and the pull will get slightly lighter.
    There is some truth to this. My P345 sucked major out of the box. I installed the lightest Wolff spring and things were great. Now after a few hundred rounds I'm thinking on upping the weight some because it's now a bit too light. The kit comes with three diffrent weights so you have some adjustment and like I said, it's pretty easy to change the spring out.

  6. #6
    Ram Rod's Avatar
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    I've had a P89 in the past. Very good pistol considering price, and dependable in my opinion, but as a ccw, kinda bulky. I do my own gunsmithing on my own firearms. The aforementioned spring kit sounds like the best idea to me, and with the right instructions/resources, one may attempt polishing the right parts to smooth the action/trigger themselves without the possibility of screwing things up. Personally, I'm not a fan of DA/SA pistols. I'm either cocked and locked, or Glocked!

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