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  1. #1
    godschild is offline Junior Member
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    Would appreciate your input on my first pistol I will be purchasing tomorrow

    I will be going to a gun and knife show tomorrow that we have every year in our area. While I have used many firearms of my family's for hunting and practicing purposes, I have never purchased one for myself. Since I haven't got my paycheck this week yet, I only have $200 to spend on a used handgun. I don't know much about models, brands, and which ones have ammo that is easily purchased (kept in stock everywhere). I know it is sad that I only have that much to spend tomorrow and yall will be laughing, but please help me to figure out what is available for my little bit of money. All I know so far is that I don't want a revolver. I would like to get something that will be able to protect my son and I if the need ever arises. Help please! Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that I plan on getting my concealed carry asap. Much love, godschild

  2. #2
    Bobv's Avatar
    Bobv is offline Junior Member
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    Most gun shows I have went to you can't buy a really good pistol for 200, unless you go with maybe a keltec 380, but they are closer to 300 new. those gun shows are good but they are usally marked up on the gun prices. you could get a Hi-point new for around that price but I don't recommend that and i am sure alot of people will agree with me. your best bet is a Mom & Pap's pawn shop and I would get a 9mm if it was my first pistol. hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    Like your screen name! Here ya go:

    What things should I look for when buying a used semi-auto pistol? - Nevada Shooters

    Selecting Your First Handgun


    Buying a Used Handgun

    Keep and Bear Arms - Gun Owners Home Page - 2nd Amendment Supporters

    General caveats? (And I don't care who does, or doesn't agree)

    1. You're always better off buying from a local dealer - with a storefront - than you are buying from an unknown dealer at a gunshow. Yes, I've made purchases at local gun shows; but, the guns were new; I'm a gunsmith; AND I knew where the dealer's store was located, and took into consideration how close (or far) the dealer was from my home.

    2. I, personally, wouldn't purchase a used Glock without test firing it first. Neither do I purchase anything other than third generation Glock pistols - Glock, GmbH/Inc.'s most extensively field tested and generally trouble-free family of pistols.

    3. I read what you said; and I'm going to tell you that I have never once in my life recommended a novice pistol shooter should begin his career with a semiautomatic pistol; and, 50 years ago, neither did I. My very first handgun was a Colt Python with a six inch barrel - A choice that I have never regretted making.

    4. What's the most common pistol(s) I see breaking down on firing lines? That would be Hi-Points; and S&W Sigmas have the very worst triggers I have ever felt on any handgun.

    5. Either 38 Special/357 Magnum, or 9 x 19mm would be the perfect centerfire cartridge for you to begin with.

    6. Neither have I ever suggested that someone should buy an inexpensive self-defense handgun. My wife and I, now, live on fixed income; but the pistol I carry everyday represents a thirteen hundred dollar (+) investment; and I did all of the modification work by myself. (Well, almost all by myself; I had a local machinist use his powered end mill and lathe to complete some machine work that I didn't want to attempt by hand.)

    7. A good first choice pistol? Either CZ, EAA, or FN/USA. (The polymer frames will cost you less.) In your situation I think I'd do some more reading, and use a credit card. Good luck, godschild! That's, 'God' with a capital, 'G' - Right!

  4. #4
    godschild is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks. I have heard that it's hard to get ammo for some firearms now and will be getting harder. Is there any certain ones that I should not get due to this problem? I am a good shot with a 9mm and a 380? or .38 I can't remember which it was. I have had success with a 40 cal of my friends with targets. I like .22 pistols of my family members. I've been shooting them all my life. I just don't know what's cheapest available lately with ammo that is easily purchased due to "ammo shortages." I'm a big sized girl with kinda big hands. I've read to stay away from Hi-Point so I know I don't want one of those. Down here at the gun shows, you can get some pretty good deals from the people that live around here that are just trying to get rid of unwanteds.

  5. #5
    godschild is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks and of course it's God's child with a Capitol G! I figured it was already used when I registered because it is on other forums that I'm on of a different subject matter. I can't get credit cards because my first husband ruined my "never used before" credit when I married him at 17 yrs old. He bankrupted after I divorced him and now I can't get my credit cleared without an attorney. I'm now 36 and can't afford an attorney lol. Thanks for your help. I appreciate it. I also don't want a hi-point or a glock because of misfiring problem associated with them. Just so everyone knows, I'm not a deadbeat. I am a disabled single mom awaiting back/neck surgery on SSI and broke. I pay my bills and have little else afterwards. I've worked my whole life paying taxes also. I was wanting to save up some $ and buy something new but my neighborhood has gone to the dogs and I no longer feel as safe as I once did when I moved here. Thieves, drug fiends, and pervs have moved in around here. Moving isn't an option right now either. I'm kinda between a rock and a hard place as they say. I shopped around at the pawn shops and their mark up is so high it's ridiculous.

  6. #6
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
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    I haven't read the previous posts, so that being the case, $200.00 isn't going to buy you anything of any quality, especially at a gunshow. You might do okay if a friend or an acquaintance had something to sell you, and if they knew your situation.

    Long story made short, keep saving up money, until you have enough to buy a decent handgun. It's going to take $400.00 or so, and that will give you the ability to purchase a decent gun.

    And......I don't mean to sound sexist, but it sounds as if you could use some help in deciding on a handgun. The last thing you want to do, is buy a piece of junk with your hard-earned money. Try and take someone along with you that knows his or her way around firearms. Ask around, I'm quite sure you'll find someone who would be willing to assist you.

  7. #7
    hud35500's Avatar
    hud35500 is offline Member
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    If you are looking for a home defense firearm, have you considered a shotgun? You could probably find a decent 12 or 20 gauge pump for $200. If a disability is an issue, the 20 gauge should work for you. I'd recommend a Mossberg 500 or Remington 870, but there are plenty of old Winchester shotguns out there for $200. something to consider.

  8. #8
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    Read this: Newbie to guns? Need help? Where to start?

    This one, which ranks various handguns, may present you with "information overload": The Handgun Information Resource

  9. #9
    godschild is offline Junior Member
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    Paratrooper, I don't think you sounded sexist at all. I will be taking someone with me when I do go to buy. I know how people will try to pass junk on to women when they think they don't know any better. Just like I would never go buy a car without a male with me. Thanks for your input. It is welcomed.

  10. #10
    godschild is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks Steve. I will read it thoroughly.

  11. #11
    godschild is offline Junior Member
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    Hi Hud. I shoot my dad's shotguns with ease so I don't think my disability should be a problem. One of my favorites of his to shoot is his old Winchester 25-35 with the octagon barrel. I love it. but he said I can't have it until he croaks lol. I also like shooting his rifle too. I can't remember what kind it is but it is from some war before Vietnam. It's awesome but he won't let me have that one until he's gone either. He said if I want one, I have to buy one just like he did. I understand though. He just wants me to buy my first firearm myself so I have more appreciation for it. And, he doesn't want to come off his. I also like to shoot sks ak series, and ar-15s. They are awesome but I don't need anything like that. Like I said, I'm not new to guns, but I don't know specifics so I appreciate all yalls help. Have a great, blessed evening.

  12. #12
    tony pasley's Avatar
    tony pasley is offline Senior Member
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    I would recommend looking at the gun show buying from a local dealer. A good .357 mag revolver can be found for $250.00 to $350.00 and it gives you 2 different types of ammo .38 spl or .357 mag. the 38's c an usually be found and are cheaper than the .357 with less recoil to practice with and there are very good self defense rounds as well. The manual of arms on a revolver is easier to learn as well as the maintenance. the needed accessories are readily available.

  13. #13
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
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    I know that you said that you didn't want a revolver. But, try to keep an open mind, as they are easy to operate and require far less maintenance than a semi-auto pistol does.

    A good brand / model of revolver truly is timeless. Semi's come and go, but a good tried and true revolver tends to hang around. I have many, mostly all S&W's. As far as I'm concerned, S&W makes the best revolver in the world. I've owned and shot many Colt Python's, and some will say they have the best action. I can't tell any difference.

    Many S&W models shoot both the .38 and the .357 round. That way, you can practice with one (.38) and use the .357 for self-defense. Myself, I prefer the stainless steel models.

    Anyways, give a good brand of revolver some thought. Learn with it, take good care of it, and then if you should decide to do so, sell it later and recoup most, if not all, of your money back.

    Whatever you end up doing or decide, the best of luck to you.

  14. #14
    Glock Doctor is offline Banned
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    I thought you might like to see my wife's first (and only) personal handgun:

    http://imageshack.us/a/img51/4760/6tft.jpg

    It's a dual caliber 38 Special/357 Magnum, Ruger SP-101 with a 3" barrel, an exposed hammer spur, and soft-rubber Hogue Monogrip. She practices with both 38's and 357's; but she always carries 357 Magnum. This is a powerful, utterly reliable handgun that is LARGE ENOUGH TO DO A LOT OF PRACTICE WITH, BUT STILL SMALL ENOUGH TO CARRY UNOBTRUSIVELY. She is, also, 'cheating heart' accurate with it, too!

    Last time my friends watched her shoot somebody asked me, 'Who taught her how to do that?' When I replied that she already knew how to shoot on the day we met; but, yes, I was the one who had shown her how to use a handgun, I heard someone in the group mutter, 'Fool, no girlfriends for you!'

    NOTE: Not to overstate the point, but, the manual-of-arms for a semiautomatic pistol is considerably more complex than for a revolver; consequently, it's a whole lot easier to make a (serious) mistake with a semi-auto than it is with a revolver. You're, also, more likely to have a misfire or failure-to-feed, as well. (You'd have to learn how to skillfully - and quickly - handle these potential problems, and to do so while you're under pressure, too.)

  15. #15
    lakeforktx is offline Junior Member
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    .410 Snake Charmer new less than $200.00..simple and will do plenty of damage..also like my Ruger LCP they are about 300.00 new...just a thought....good luck with what ever you get...

  16. #16
    niadhf's Avatar
    niadhf is online now Senior Member
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    I would suggest looking for a Makarov PM or CZ82. Ammo can be tricky to find, but it is out there. 9x18 is like a 380+P. and they can be found in good shape for 175-275 depending on area (and some places 325 and up)
    That said, I too love a good 357 revolver. I personally would not count them out.
    And as usual, this advice is worth what you paid for it...

  17. #17
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeforktx View Post
    .410 Snake Charmer new less than $200.00..simple and will do plenty of damage..also like my Ruger LCP they are about 300.00 new...just a thought....good luck with what ever you get...
    With all due respect, this is very bad advice.
    The .410 shotgun shell is not a good fight stopper, particularly from a very short barrel.
    The derringer form of pistol gives you only two shots, and is very difficult to reload quickly.
    This derringer must be thumb-cocked for each separate shot, which is also a slow, fumble-prone process when you are in real danger.
    And the derringer form of pistol is too small to be fired comfortably with effective accuracy.

  18. #18
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
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    When Snake Charmer was mentioned, this came to mind: Original 'SNAKE CHARMER' H.KOON INC .410 : Single Shot Shotguns at GunBroker.com

    Even still, I can think of better choices. I'm just not a big fan of long guns for home defense.

  19. #19
    lakeforktx is offline Junior Member
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    I was thinking "budget" minded, and how simple to operate...and the Snake Charmer is pretty small...

  20. #20
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeforktx View Post
    I was thinking "budget" minded, and how simple to operate...and the Snake Charmer is pretty small...

    You pretty much have to be spot on your game with a single shot firearm.

    Doesn't leave much room for a mistake.......one that could cost you your life.

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