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  1. #1
    Irishguy1 is offline Junior Member
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    Jul 2013
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    Illinois
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    Questions About Cleaning Your Gun...

    I am posting this after viewing several threads about cleaning your gun, some youtube videos, etc....

    I have a good (and pretty standard gun cleaning kit and after watching some videos - I have noted some discrepancies (or differences) and wanted the sage advice from this forum.

    - I have 3 new handguns that I have yet to shoot and it seems pretty clear that you should clean the factory stuff out of them prior to shooting them -
    <A> Many videos show the focus to be on the barrel - what about the receiver and spring?
    - I cannot find a clear answer about using a bore brush versus the slotted end with a cloth patch
    <B> I apologize and know this is a hand-gun forum (so if I offend anyone with this next question - no offense intended, but it is a cleaning issue)
    - Is there anything special with cleaning an AR-15 (I have a Bushmaster M4) - I have a good video on stripping the gun
    <C> Lastly, I know everyone has their personal favorite cleaning solution and oil, any favorites (Rem9),etc...?

    Thank you - I know a clean and well maintained gun is a happy gun and makes a happy gun owner and want to make sure I do right by my firearms. Thanks

  2. #2
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    2,763
    When it comes to a new firearm, be it handgun or long gun, I do an inspection of them prior to shooting them, but don't waste time cleaning them prior to firing. Some are gonna flame me for stating this, but so be it.

    I use both a brass wire brush and a cleaning patch. Using one doesn't mean you don't have to use the other.

    Cleaning an AR-15 means breaking down the bolt to it's various parts and cleaning both exterior and interior surfaces. Clean the bore and chamber well. Lightly lube the bolt and it's parts prior to re-insertion into the receiver. Insure that dirt, debris, etc. are cleared out and away from the trigger group / housing.

    I use Hoppe's #9 and Rem Oil. Tooth brushes, cotton swabs and plenty of bore patches are essential to a good cleaning kit.

    I'm sure that I've forgotten some things, but there will be others to come along and fill in the blanks.

  3. #3
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
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    5,549
    Quote Originally Posted by paratrooper View Post
    When it comes to a new firearm, be it handgun or long gun...don't waste time cleaning them prior to firing. Some are gonna flame me for stating this...[emphasis added]
    Me! Me! Can I be the one? Huh? Can I?

    Since you don't know what kind of anti-rust goop the factory applied before shipping the gun out, and since disassembly and reassembly (while reading the instructions, of course) breeds familiarity and knowledge, I strongly recommend that a brand-new weapon be thoroughly cleaned before its first use.

    But if you aren't worried about possible malfunctions of the most mysterious kinds, and if you are averse to knowledge and learning, why then you just go right ahead and shoot the dear thing without cleaning it first.

    And if it does suffer a mysterious malfunction or two, why, you can just use the heat of this "flame" to set everything aright.

  4. #4
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
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    Feb 2012
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    2,763
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Me! Me! Can I be the one? Huh? Can I?

    Since you don't know what kind of anti-rust goop the factory applied before shipping the gun out, and since disassembly and reassembly (while reading the instructions, of course) breeds familiarity and knowledge, I strongly recommend that a brand-new weapon be thoroughly cleaned before its first use.

    But if you aren't worried about possible malfunctions of the most mysterious kinds, and if you are averse to knowledge and learning, why then you just go right ahead and shoot the dear thing without cleaning it first.

    And if it does suffer a mysterious malfunction or two, why, you can just use the heat of this "flame" to set everything aright.

    I've yet to have an issue shooting a new firearm w/o cleaning it first. If I were to entertain a guess, that number of new firearms would amount to over 50, over the past 20 yrs. or so.

    I'm not adverse to knowledge and learning. Rumor has it, one tends to lead to the other. Anyways, I always inspect a new firearm for anything obvious that may pose a problem. If I were to discover excess grease, metal shavings or something else that would be a problem, I would act on it.

    Not saying that it's for everyone. I'm just saying that I'm okay with it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Georgia, for now
    Posts
    501
    I always disassemble a new firearm and check the bore for obstructions. Please notice the order - Disassemble the firearm - then check the bore.I have noticed fewer people have been shot by bare barrels than assembled, "empty" firearms.

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