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  1. #1
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    Question What gun can be probably moved from one area of the US to another area.

    Main Question: I'm asking you. What gun should I buy.

    I'm looking for a specific handgun that meets a narrow criteria. This is because some US states prohibit the ownership of certain guns in their state, counties, or cities. So, here it is. Under what conditions (permit, training, talking to lawyers, etc), can I own only one gun (or more than one gun if necessary for training and for defense) and legally/potentially live in any US state?

    As you can probably guess, my job forces me to move around a lot, so any gun I buy should have the potential to be moved to any US state. Can I live in more than one arbitrary state with only one gun? Why is your choice of gun right for me.


    Details:
    Yes, beyond being an exciting thing to do, I want to be realistic and try and protect myself with my first handgun. The gun can be an automatic or revolver. I'm hoping that it will be the only gun I ever own, and I never have to shoot anyone.

    Reason to buy gun: Recently, a close family friend was killed at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut. I found out six days later. I was stunned and dazed for a few days after that. I'm still a little emotional about it. This death amounts to a final warning to me. I.E.: I either have to learn how to protect myself or potentially face the same consequence.

    During this time of grief, I kept seeing myself unsuccessfully trying to attack the killer with a spray can. Can you imagine that disaster.

    My background is that I, personally, have always been concerned about my own self defense. For example, when I moved myself across the country (US) a year ago, I purchased my first mace can. At the time, I did not buy a taser because it's not legal in some areas of the US. My mace can that came from 'Sports Authority' only allows me to have 5 or 10 sprays before it empties out!

    Over the last year, I have had a safe room in my home, etc. I have always bought a lot of self defense stuff but never have become active in survival. I spent over a decade about $1,000.00 on my hobby. This stuff is all collecting dust.

    That said, I want to seriously protect myself with a good reliable gun which is practical, easy to maintain, and is affordable to "keep". I have never owned or used a gun before. But, I want to protect myself the best way possible.

    I am serious.

    Once I have a gun, I will take the "Basic Pistol" NRA course. I obtained this little tid-bit of information via a suggestion from glock.pro.

    I'm hoping that you can help me solve my dilemma (with or without a gun). I'm lost, so I need enough information to be able to seriously get protected with a gun.

    Again, I want to own a gun in several unknown US states. I have lived all over the US, so if I am to own a gun I have to consider living in any US state. My profession forces me to live all over the place. I want to become an expert at protecting myself with my gun.

    If one gun cannot possibly meet this strict criteria then what gun can be legally moved to the most US states. How many states can this gun be moved to and what are they.

    Basically, what gun can I buy to allow me to do this. I have never shot or owned a gun before. So, if you highly recommend that I own more than one gun please explain the reasons to me. (E.G.:One gun should be used to learn, and the second can be my main gun.)

    If you suggest that I own a different gun in almost every state please elaborate on this to me. What is the best way to do this.

    Also, how do I physically move the gun from state to state. I called the "Allied Moving" company, and they told me that they cannot transport the gun. Someone else told me that was probably because of insurance. Will I have to always sell my gun before I move. Can I put the gun and 200 rounds of ammunition in a checked bag at the airlines and get away with just telling them it's there. Or, should I call them first. What does the US law say I have to do to move my gun to a different state?

    Here is what the Internet site glock.pro told me. I should consult the local authories at my future destination about their gun laws/information. And, they told me to review state and city information from the sites www-nraila.org and handgunlaw.us. They also told me to become an NRA member and to get a carry permit because most incidents just don't occur in the home. One person there gave me the tip that if a gun is approved for California, Illinois, and Massachusetts then it is probably legal anywhere in the US.

    glock.pro did not give me specific gun to buy recommendations. Here at handgunforum I want to at least reduce my large available pool of guns to a smaller manageble size.

    I was previously considering of purchasing a Glock 20 SF (with 15 round magazines) as a first gun. I am no longer considering this gun because I probably woun't be able to handle the recoil.

    I don't feel I can use a 22 caliber gun because it doesn't have a realistic self defense recoil.

    There is a limit to my buget to do all this. I.E.: It's just not unlimited. I, ultimately, just want to protect myself. And, do what I have to do to be able to adequately shoot it year after year.

    If I decide to purchase a gun I will buy it and the other required things from a shop near where I live. I'll buy a vertical holster for much later, cleaning kit, ammo, et.

    Is a 9mm gun the best handgun for me. If so what specific gun meets my strict requirements. I want a gun which is easy to use, maintainable, and reliable. I guess the fewer the parts the better for me.

    Finally, what ammunition should I buy, and how much should I keep in my home. Should I buy ammo for the training range and different ammo for the gun while it's at home. Why is that.

    Thank you,
    Last edited by SelfDefenseNovice; 01-06-2013 at 05:41 PM. Reason: Make it better writing

  2. #2
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    WOW, alot to digest......sounds like you're starting in the right direction..............to make it short, I would try to find someone in your area that is very knowledgeable in firearms and safety, and get some ideas from that person.....finding a firearm is so much personal choice, that no one can tell you what you should purchase. The states you mentioned are a PITA, there may be a few more that have regulations on types of firearms, NY for instance. Some also have regulations on magazines ie. high capacity. I may get some argument, but I think that a 9mm would be a good choice to start. NO, you cannot just put a firearm and ammo in a bag and tell the airlines that it's there. Check airlines rules and regulations for transporting firearms. Look at accuracy before caliber. A .22 cal. although small, in the hands of a competant shooter, is very deadly. I wouldn't carry one, but that's me. If you do a bit of searching, you can look up states lists of acceptable firearms for that state. I would think that most on this forum own more than one firearm, but not because of state laws. Good luck.

  3. #3
    ponzer04's Avatar
    ponzer04 is online now Member
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    A full sized 1911 should suit you for all you desire. this is also a great 1st pistol.

    A Ruger SR9c stocked up on 10 round mags should also meet those needs and it also can accept 17rd mags.

    I'm not so sure that what you as is too difficult to accomplish. As for flying with ammo there are a few posts on that . you can fly with up to 11lbs of ammunition and up to I think 5 firearms. you just have to follow the rules for packaging the guns & ammo.

  4. #4
    ponzer04's Avatar
    ponzer04 is online now Member
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    have fun with the choosing

  5. #5
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponzer04 View Post
    A full sized 1911 should suit you for all you desire.
    Can you give me more information about the full sized 1911 suit of guns. It doesn't sound like a specific gun recommendation, but a category of guns! For example, it sounds like a type of car such as Ford or Volkswagon, but for guns.

  6. #6
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    The "1911" is a very specific type of semi-automatic pistol. It is legal to own in all states which permit private ownership of handguns.
    The original version was designed by John Browning for the Colt's Patent Firearm Company, and was adopted, as the "Pistol, .45, M1911," for use by the US military services in 1911.
    Nowadays, many different companies make duplicates of the original pistol. Most of them have added features, which may either add to or subtract from the pistol's utility for you.

    Because you are a complete novice, I suggest that you do not purchase a pistol yet. Don't be in a hurry.
    Instead, invest in a series of training courses in which you will be given the opportunity to handle, and maybe even use, many different pistols. You will also learn safety, gun and self-defense law, and how to shoot a handgun (which is not as easy as you might think).
    Once you have some experience and training, then you can make a truly rational choice of which gun, and what ammunition, to buy.

    Nobody here can really tell you what to get and how to use what you eventually purchase. We can only relate our own preferences to you, none of which will necessarily suit your needs.
    Get some experience. Seek some face-to-face guidance. Try things out.

  7. #7
    denner's Avatar
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    The first criteria i would suggest is look to a state and it's laws that has the most restrictions on firearms. I believe California tops the list. Next would be obtaining a CCW in the state in which you reside and hope it's a state that has broad reciprocity and be very sure you know the law in any state in which you visit before you visit there w/ a firearm. Likewise, I beleive you can't even enter Commiefornia w/ any firearm unless you first pay a fee, have a background check, be cleared by there justice department and have it registered. Thankfully the highly restrictive states are few. I know that some states have restrictions on magazine capacity and/or the type of pistol allowed(California), while the great majority don't.
    Last edited by denner; 01-11-2013 at 03:24 AM.

  8. #8
    Smitty79's Avatar
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    Listen to Steve. Also, Lots of places rent handguns. Go rent a variety and see what feels good.

  9. #9
    shaolin's Avatar
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    I would suggest that you buy a handgun that doesn't hold more than 10 rounds.
    Glock 26 or 27
    S&W Shield in 9mm or .40
    Beretta Nano 9mm
    S&W 637 .38 spl would be a good gun to have. It only hold 5 rounds but that should be enough for someone who doesn't shoot much and it has the min. power level to stop a threat. Doesn't jam and easy to learn how to shoot.
    I personally carry the S&W 3913 9mm more than any other gun. It is very accurate and hold 8+1 rds of 9mm ammo which is enough of 99% of real world shootings. It is large enough to hold and easy to conceal and for a 1st gun it would be perfect.
    It can be had for under $350 too leaving money for a good holster and night sights. 2nd favorite gun is the Kimber CDP .45acp and it is a great gun with knock down plus good feel and function.

  10. #10
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    I'm in Virginia. It's an open carry state.

    I just brought home a PT-1911 45 caliber for $873, ordered 100 rounds of 45 ACP ammunition for target practice (2 boxes for $37.44 each), 20 rounds of 45 ACP hollow point for defense ($21.95), a nylon vertical holster ($83.10), paid for a NRA First Steps Pistol course (on Jan 19 for $77), paid for a NRA Concealed Carry course (on Jan 26 for $67), and a $10 cleaning kit. With tax, the total cost was $1277.61. I'll be able to get a carry permit once I pass either of the courses through a local police station.

    Here is what I was told about the laws. I have to separate the gun and ammo by placing one in the trunk of my car and the other in the glove compartment. If a police officer stops me I have to tell him/her I just bought a gun or I'm going to the range. And, it's in the trunk, do you want me to open the trunk. It's best for me to only have the gun in the car if I'm going to the gun dealer or to the shooting range. On my person, I have to keep the gun, so that it's not hidden. Or,I should keep the gun on the seat of my car, so that it can be seen easily. This all changes when I get the carry permit.

    How good is Virginia's carry permit. Do other states accept it.

    I was shown a lot about how to shoot, and a little about how to clean the gun.

    In order to move a gun to another state, I can use Federal Firearm Dealers to do it for a small fee.

  11. #11
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    It is legal to own in all states which permit private ownership of handguns.
    One other question. I know there are 9mm M1911s and my 45 ACP PT-1911. Is my PT-1911 capable of being moved to all US states. The 45 ACP has more gun power than the 9mm.

  12. #12
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    1. You didn't buy enough ammunition. Only 100 rounds for practice is nowhere near enough. Start with at least 500 rounds.
    2. Federal law permits you to freely move a gun you legally possess, from one location where that gun is legal to possess, to any other location where that gun is legal to possess. You can carry it in your car, obeying the laws of the states through which you pass, and you can even freely ship it from yourself to yourself, via UPS or FedEx, without recourse to a licensed dealer.
    3. Your 1911 is legal in all states where the possession of a pistol is legal.
    4. Although I believe that the .45 cartridge is more effective in self-defense than is the 9mm, other people disagree. "Power" is not the issue, however. Assuming a cartridge adequate for self-defense, accuracy (hit placement) is much more important than bullet size or speed. Learn to shoot accurately, practice enough to become reasonably quick, and you will present a truly effective self-defense effort.
    5. I know nothing about the laws of Virginia. Nobody here is competent to give you legal advice. The laws of Virginia, and of all other states, are available online, clearly indexed. Gun laws are frequently found indexed under the heading, "Criminal Law." You can do your own research, or you can consult an attorney. The NRA instructor will also be an excellent resource.

  13. #13
    shaolin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SelfDefenseNovice View Post
    I'm in Virginia. It's an open carry state.

    I just brought home a PT-1911 45 caliber for $873, ordered 100 rounds of 45 ACP ammunition for target practice (2 boxes for $37.44 each), 20 rounds of 45 ACP hollow point for defense ($21.95), a nylon vertical holster ($83.10), paid for a NRA First Steps Pistol course (on Jan 19 for $77), paid for a NRA Concealed Carry course (on Jan 26 for $67), and a $10 cleaning kit. With tax, the total cost was $1277.61. I'll be able to get a carry permit once I pass either of the courses through a local police station.

    Here is what I was told about the laws. I have to separate the gun and ammo by placing one in the trunk of my car and the other in the glove compartment. If a police officer stops me I have to tell him/her I just bought a gun or I'm going to the range. And, it's in the trunk, do you want me to open the trunk. It's best for me to only have the gun in the car if I'm going to the gun dealer or to the shooting range. On my person, I have to keep the gun, so that it's not hidden. Or,I should keep the gun on the seat of my car, so that it can be seen easily. This all changes when I get the carry permit.

    How good is Virginia's carry permit. Do other states accept it.

    I was shown a lot about how to shoot, and a little about how to clean the gun.

    In order to move a gun to another state, I can use Federal Firearm Dealers to do it for a small fee.
    Yes Virgina's permit is good in a lot of states!
    Using a FFD may not be needed depending on which state you move to.
    Certain states will allow you to have the gun loaded in the car even without a permit "GA","SC","FL" but when doubt travel with it unloaded and separate from it ammo.
    Get your Permit soon.

  14. #14
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    1. You didn't buy enough ammunition. Only 100 rounds for practice is nowhere near enough. Start with at least 500 rounds.
    I ordered 400 more rounds for a total of 500 target rounds. In addition, I have only 80 rounds of hollow point.

    How do I train with the 500 target rounds. It's so much! I was thinking I should shoot 50 rounds a week until I feel comfortable with the gun. How would you define comfortable. What training schedule do you recommend I follow and why. Should I go to more than one shooting range.

  15. #15
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Speak about this to your NRA instructors.
    It is not enough, merely to burn through 50 rounds in a weekend. You need to have a "lesson plan."
    Use the instructors as a resource, to help you plan a practice schedule which includes one 10-minute dry-firing session every day with at least 50 rounds of live-fire every week.

    Start shooting at three or five yards. Use a blank target (with no bulls-eye, or other aiming point). Shoot to hit the center area of the blank target.
    When you can do that with every shot, without fail, move the target to 10 yards, and start all over again. The next step is 15 yards. Then 20. (If you're brave, you could end up at 25 yards.)
    When you've done all of that, start all over again doing "double taps"—that is, shoot two shots with each single presentation. Both shots should hit close to each other.

    You use a blank target because self-defense "targets" don't have bullseyes printed on them. Get used to shooting at what's called "the center of mass."
    Do not try to present, or to shoot, quickly. Do everything slowly and smoothly. Concentrate upon being as smooth as possible. Speed comes from lots and lots of slow, smooth practice.
    A wise man once said: "Smooth is faster than fast." If you'd like to prove this to yourself, shoot fast and see what happens.

    Hold your pistol as tightly as you can, and stiffen your arms. It doesn't matter if the gun, your hands, and your arms shake.
    Your pistol needs the entire recoil impulse, in order to function correctly. Do not absorb recoil by letting your hands and arms flex. Keep 'em stiff. Bear down. Follow through.

    It is my personal philosophy to have about a month's supply of ammunition on hand, especially nowadays. You should try to buy more as you use your stock up, but occasionally you will find the shelves bare. This is why I said that you need at least 500 rounds.
    You do not need dedicated-self-defense ammunition yet. Use some of the hollow-points you bought to make sure that your pistol will "digest" them. (If it doesn't, send me a PM about it.)

  16. #16
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Use the instructors as a resource, to help you plan a practice schedule which includes one 10-minute dry-firing session every day with at least 50 rounds of live-fire every week.
    My gun dealer told me not to dry fire the gun, because it harms it. He couldn't explain why there is a difference between a live fire and a dry fire. What do I have to get/use to be able to dry fire as you suggest. Someone in the store mentioned that there was something I could use to prevent harming the gun.

  17. #17
    95chevy is offline Junior Member
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    Re: What gun can be probably moved from one area of the US to another area.

    I'm not positive on this but I think if you dry fire too often the firing pin will "over travel" and possibly break. But that's just my guess. But to dry fire safley use some snap caps.

  18. #18
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Yup: Buy a set of snap-caps in the proper size (caliber).
    Snap-caps are dummy cartridges that are designed to absorb the blow of your pistol's firing pin, and keep it from being damaged.
    If you can find them, get the red, all-aluminum ones (A-Zoom, I believe). The half-plastic ones (red, blue, and green) don't last very long.

    If your local gun shop doesn't have them, look at Brownells on-line: AMMO SNAP-CAPS | Brownells


    Since you have a 1911, you can make your very own "snap-cap replacement." Cut a piece of 1/4"-thick foam rubber or Neoprene to just fit within the slide channel into which the hammer falls. It will absorb the force of the hammer as it falls, since it is between the firing pin and the hammer. The piece of foam should be just wide enough to be a light wedge-in fit, so it doesn't fall out, but can easily be removed.

    If you use a two-hand grip to shoot (which you should), you do not need to relax your master hand (usually the right hand). Use your off-side hand's thumb to cock the hammer for each dry-fire "shot." Use your master-hand's thumb to then push upwards on the safety lever, to move it to "on."
    Every shot or double-tap, dry or live, should begin with the safety "on." Your master-hand's thumb presses the safety to "off" when the pistol is about halfway up to eye level. (But your index finger does not contact the trigger until your sights are lined-up correctly on the target.)

  19. #19
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    I ordered two boxes of snap caps (A-Zoom Aluminum Snap Cap 45 Cal) from my gun dealer for $42.66. There are five in a box, so they'll fill up one magazine.

    Here is a A-Zoom dealer online:

    A-Zoom Snap Caps, no other snap caps are more precise or rugged

    Questions: How do these snap-caps work. Do I have to pick them up from the floor and then reload the magazine after shooting. I'll have to clean them affter each shot. How many times can I fire them. Should I polish them every month.

  20. #20
    SelfDefenseNovice is offline Junior Member
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    I bought a PT-1911 gun, 500 rounds of target ammo, 100 self defense rounds, a nylon holster, $10 cleaning kit, 2 NRA courses (yet to be taken), 75 decibel noise reduction headset, and 10 snap-caps.

    Should I buy anything else.

    What other things can make my life easier.

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