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  1. #1
    s1mp13m4n is offline Junior Member
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    Should a newbie consider a Hi-Point firearm?

    Hello everyone. I did not see a brand forum for the Hi-Point so I thought I would ask about them here as I am new to guns and do not own my first firearm yet. I am not trying to start a huge debate but I have a few questions about this brand. First off is this brand a case of "you get what you pay for" or is it a serious value for the money? I understand that a gun like this could never stand up to a Glock but is a Hi-Point a quality gun at a cheap price? Why is a Hi-Point so cheap and a S&W three times the price? Thanks for the input and for helping me learn.

  2. #2
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    The following remarks apply to all Hi-Point pistols, regardless of caliber.

    Pro:
    1. It's cheap. If it ever breaks, they'll fix it free—or you could just throw it away.
    2. It's more accurate than you are.

    Con:
    1. It's made primarily of Zymak (Zinc), and will disintegrate eventually—maybe pretty soon.
    2. It doesn't fit anybody's hands particularly well. And it's heavy.
    3. It has an atrocious trigger action—heavy, hard, and gritty.
    4. It's unsuited for concealed carry. It's too big and heavy for the round it shoots.
    5. There are no decent holsters available for it.
    6. Did I say that it's heavy? And that the trigger is terrible?

  3. #3
    s1mp13m4n is offline Junior Member
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    OK, heavy is a good thing when it comes to helping control recoil, right? I am noticing that compared to other guns the Hi-Point seems heavier and larger compared to the competition. Yeah the HP is ugly but I do not care about that, I am interested in it being a quality gun and something you can count on. The gun does seem to be a brock but because I have not carried a gun I am not sure if a few ounces matter.....would you get use to the weight?

  4. #4
    95chevy is offline Junior Member
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    Re: Should a newbie consider a Hi-Point firearm?

    I wouldn't own a high point if it was given to me for free. I feel like a firearm should last a life time. And I just never got that impression when handling the hi point. Even the glocks. I don't like those. They seem cheap and very plastic like. (I know they are a good gun, just my opinion on them) If money is a concern I would just wait and keep saving. But don't wait too long , who knows what will happen with Osama back in.

  5. #5
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by s1mp13m4n View Post
    OK, heavy is a good thing when it comes to helping control recoil, right?...I am interested in it being a quality gun and something you can count on....would you get use to the weight?
    Below, I have highlighted my own words, in partial answer to your questions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    The following remarks apply to all Hi-Point pistols, regardless of caliber.

    Pro:
    1. It's cheap. If it ever breaks, they'll fix it free—or you could just throw it away.
    2. It's more accurate than you are.

    Con:
    1. It's made primarily of Zymak (Zinc), and will disintegrate eventually—maybe pretty soon.
    2. It doesn't fit anybody's hands particularly well. And it's heavy.
    3. It has an atrocious trigger action—heavy, hard, and gritty.
    4. It's unsuited for concealed carry. It's too big and heavy for the round it shoots.
    5. There are no decent holsters available for it.
    6. Did I say that it's heavy? And that the trigger is terrible?
    A pistol made of Zymak castings will someday become unreliable, because one or more parts will break unexpectedly—probably at the worst possible time. Cast Zymak is not a proper material from which to make a save-your-life pistol.
    Accurate shooting is governed mostly by two factors: The fit of the gun to the hand that grips it, and the shooter's ability to control the trigger press. Save-your-life shooting depends entirely upon practical accuracy. A pistol with a heavy, gritty, hard trigger action will make learning to shoot accurately very, very difficult for you and your wife.
    A pistol that is unnecessarily heavy causes user fatigue. It will also be fatiguing to carry. Yes, a heavy pistol "absorbs" recoil, making shooting easier; but there is a point at which added weight becomes a liability, rather than an asset.
    Carrying a heavy pistol requires a supportive-yet-accessible holster. None exist for Hi-Point pistols.

    It is absolutely impossible to buy a "quality gun" (you mean "high quality," I hope) for the price of a Hi-Point pistol.
    A quick survey of pistol prices should quickly convince you of this fact. "Quality"—that is, high quality—isn't cheap.
    (Psssst: Wanna buy a Yugo? Low mileage!)

  6. #6
    s1mp13m4n is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the help on this. Time to look at a Rugar. LOL

  7. #7
    Leo's Avatar
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    The EAA SAR B6 can be had for under $300. This inexpensive 9mm pistol is a great gun. You can order it from your LGS or Davidson's.

  8. #8
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    You get what you pay for.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by s1mp13m4n View Post
    Thanks for the help on this. Time to look at a Rugar. LOL
    If you are deciding to look at Ruger I would suggest looking at the SR9/SR9c pistols. Our SR9c is an awesome pistol I would trust as much as my 1911.

  10. #10
    Bisley's Avatar
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    Among handgun enthusiasts, High Point is considered to be a very ugly trot-line weight (fishing), but most grudgingly admit that they do seem to work, more often than not. That's not a glowing recommendation for something you may bet your life on, but it might, in some cases be better than no gun at all.

    Besides, if it doesn't fire, it's a better club than most popular pistols.

  11. #11
    lapetrarca53 is offline Junior Member
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    I have NO complaints about my Hi Point.

    Yeah, it's big and ugly but, it goes "bang" every time I pull the trigger and it puts every shot on paper and comes with a lifetime, transferable warranty. For less than $200 for the C9, it got me started shooting again after a 30+ year absence.

    In all honesty though, I recently "upgraded" to an S&W SD9 VE.

  12. #12
    Harryball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by s1mp13m4n View Post
    Hello everyone. I did not see a brand forum for the Hi-Point so I thought I would ask about them here as I am new to guns and do not own my first firearm yet. I am not trying to start a huge debate but I have a few questions about this brand. First off is this brand a case of "you get what you pay for" or is it a serious value for the money? I understand that a gun like this could never stand up to a Glock but is a Hi-Point a quality gun at a cheap price? Why is a Hi-Point so cheap and a S&W three times the price? Thanks for the input and for helping me learn.
    It is a "get what you pay for" If you are looking for a value priced weapon look into the Bersa line of firearms.

  13. #13
    chessail77's Avatar
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    If money and cost are an issue, then as stated above Bersa, S&W SD, Ruger P95 are just a few dollars more and might be good ones to check out.

  14. #14
    s1mp13m4n is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you all very much. From what I am reading it seems that a Hi Point firearm is not the main primary gun that a person may own, but rather another gun that they own. I am not planning on owning a lot of guns, so I would rather have one overall quality gun rather than one that may or may not be the right choice for a beginner. Rather than go in debt for a Rugar, S&W, M&P, Springfield, I will just wait a little longer and save up for a better overall unit.

  15. #15
    Leo's Avatar
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    Yep, Hi-Point pistols are the evil guns, you can't say they're POS but they are truly get what you pay for as some said above. If you want to get more info on them, you need to visit the "hipointfirearmsforums dot com" site.

    Steve has summed the Hi-Points up pretty well. I never owned a Hi-Point but shot a few at the range. They're OK but bulky and heavy.

  16. #16
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    Ruger SR9 or SR40.......$399.......can't get much cheaper for a quality firearm..

  17. #17
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    Re: Should a newbie consider a Hi-Point firearm?

    If cost is an issue talk to you local gun stores and see if the can call you if a quality used gun comes in. Sometimes they are can be very helpful, plus some used guns get fired very little. Smaller stores seem to be more willing to do this then box store. We all have guns that spend most the time in the safe sometime we just can't justify having them and someone ends up with a deal.

  18. #18
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    I have to echo swany. Way, way back in this conversation, I should have recommended, as he has now done, that the very best value will be found by buying a used gun.
    If you become friendly with the gun-shop owner, you usually can arrange a return-for-credit, if the used gun doesn't suit you. Then you use the credit to try out another used gun.
    In such cases, it also pays to become friendly with a good gunsmith. Let him survey the used gun you've chosen, for a recommendation to keep or to return.

    Jean and I own many guns, and all but two of them were bought used.

  19. #19
    s1mp13m4n is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    I have to echo swany. Way, way back in this conversation, I should have recommended, as he has now done, that the very best value will be found by buying a used gun.
    If you become friendly with the gun-shop owner, you usually can arrange a return-for-credit, if the used gun doesn't suit you. Then you use the credit to try out another used gun.
    In such cases, it also pays to become friendly with a good gunsmith. Let him survey the used gun you've chosen, for a recommendation to keep or to return.

    Jean and I own many guns, and all but two of them were bought used.
    Good advice on this. My cousin is a gunsmith on the side....has his license, etc.....does not work on them as a career. He is a little biased towards the 45 and the 1911 in general. Trying to get tons of help in picking a gun from him is a little hard. I do not have a problem with used as long as the gun is in good shape and is a good deal. If I can get the same gun new for $100 more, then I would rather get it new. If I can get a $750 gun for $375, then I am all in. LOL

  20. #20
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    Re: Should a newbie consider a Hi-Point firearm?

    1911 are nice but for most people I'm not sure I would recommend one as a first gun. I'm a big fan of manual safetys on hunting equipment but not on things that may be used in a defense senario. If I have to draw I've already decided it not safe.

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